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  3. Jan 6 panel: More people turn up with evidence against Trump WASHINGTON (AP) — More witnesses are coming forward with new details on the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol riot following former White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson’s devastating testimony last week against former President Donald Trump, says a member of a House committee investigating the insurrection. https://apnews.com/article/capitol-siege-donald-trump-adam-kinzinger-pat-cipollone-government-and-politics-f7ce36ed29a132570b6557fa0f85b13d
  4. ‘Hell on earth’: Ukrainian soldiers describe eastern front BAKHMUT, Ukraine (AP) — Torched forests and cities burned to the ground. Colleagues with severed limbs. Bombardments so relentless the only option is to lie in a trench, wait and pray. https://apnews.com/article/russia-ukraine-kyiv-donetsk-government-and-politics-f9f2b30b90a10b31f16aca18dae4eb65?
  5. phkrause

    The New York Times

    July 4, 2022 By Melissa Kirsch Good morning. A chosen family can offer love and support that aren’t defined by biological kinship. Allie Sullberg All in the family Today, as we observe the Fourth of July holiday in the U.S., I’m thinking about the permutations of family, the people we invite to the cookout, the ones we’ll be watching the fireworks with. Perhaps you’ll be with your parents and siblings, your kids, your kids’ kids. Perhaps you’ll gather with close friends, with neighbors, reunite with your pandemic pod. Last week marked the conclusion of Pride Month in the United States. Pride is broadly a celebration of L.G.B.T.Q. rights, but for many members of queer communities, it’s also a celebration of their chosen family. Chosen families are created outside the structures of (and often in place of) the traditional nuclear family. In the case of the Bickersons, a group of about 10 to 20 queer women, most of whom live near Asheville, N.C., this means raucous Thanksgivings, fishing trips and three-day birthday celebrations. It’s also meant working on one another’s homes, helping each other get sober and providing love and support when one of the group is ill. “We didn’t have to censor,” one member of the Bickersons, Lenny Lasater, told The Times. “We were real, we were honest, and we could expect to be met with compassion and understanding.” When a family of origin is absent or unsupportive, a chosen family is essential. And even if your biological family is intact, cultivating close, supportive relationships with neighbors, friends and colleagues can provide welcome kinship, as many of us found during the pandemic. The pandemic pod was a temporary chosen family, born of necessity. People who might otherwise never have fetched groceries for one another or shared strategies for locating toilet paper, let alone discussed issues of life and death, were suddenly one another’s confidantes. Once you’ve known the rewards of that sort of unexpected intimacy, it seems silly that any chosen family should be temporary. While people, at varying speeds and comfort levels, move on from the most pod-intensive stages of the pandemic, is there any reason the love, the interdependence, the podsgivings shouldn’t continue? The beauty of the chosen family is that you opt into it. There’s freedom in that, an opportunity to cocreate a community that suits your values. Take the Old Gays, a group of “grandfluencers” who live in a house together in the California desert and create videos for their 7.6 million TikTok followers. “As you get into old age, moving into a nursing home is what’s expected, and many older people buy into that plan,” said Robert Reeves, a member of the group. “What we’re doing, through the strength of our friendships and our mutual support, is changing the course of the way one lives their life.” Do you have a chosen family? Tell me about it. In the meantime, enjoy the holiday. For more Listen to Jenna Wortham and Wesley Morris discuss queer chosen families in pop culture on the “Still Processing” podcast. “We don’t need to be related to relate,” sings Rina Sawayama in “Chosen Family.” THE LATEST NEWS War in Ukraine Russia, in control of large parts of the Donbas region, can now focus on capturing the last Ukrainian holdout in neighboring Donetsk. Despite warnings from the Pentagon, American veterans are training Ukrainians near the front lines. Fourth of July Last year’s hot dog competition in Coney Island.Brittainy Newman/Associated Press Staffing shortages and a boom in travel demand caused more than 1,400 flight cancellations in the U.S. over the holiday weekend. The Nathan’s hot dog eating competition is back. Here’s what to know. Other Big Stories A shopping mall in Copenhagen after a shooting there yesterday.Olafur Steinar Rye Gestsson/Ritzau Scanpix Foto, via Associated Press A gunman killed three people at a mall in Copenhagen. The police said the motive probably was not terrorism. The Supreme Court decision to reverse Roe v. Wade has launched judicial and political battles that could last years. He filmed Jan. 6 footage for Russian TV: An American’s murky path from businessman to far-right media figure and pro-Russia propagandist. The I.R.S. approved 76 fake charities that shared a mailbox. Reduced vetting at the agency has opened the door to scams. The C.D.C. has linked a Florida-made ice cream to a listeria outbreak that has sickened people in 10 states. Opinions Gail Collins and Bret Stephens discuss the E.P.A. and Donald Trump. Alexander and Yevgeny Vindman, who fled Ukraine in 1979, argue for letting more refugees into America in a video by Ken Burns. Support the reporting behind The Morning. A subscription to The Times helps bring the facts to light. Subscribe today. MORNING READS A drone at Jones Beach.Johnny Milano for The New York Times Jaws: With drones and trackers, New York beaches are stepping up their shark patrols. New York: A reporter traveled to all five boroughs and asked: What’s the vibe? Ask Well: Are some processed meats worse for you than others? Quiz time: The average score on our latest news quiz was 9.2. See if you can do better. A Times classic: The 10 most influential films of the 2010s. Advice from Wirecutter: What to bring when you go berry picking. Lives Lived: Vladimir Zelenko received national attention in 2020 when the White House embraced his hydroxychloroquine regimen. He died at 48. SPORTS NEWS FROM THE ATHLETIC A programming note: This new sports section is written by the staff of The Athletic. Kevin Durant’s next home: The Brooklyn Nets superstar has asked for a trade. The Athletic’s John Hollinger explored possible trade paths to Los Angeles with the Lakers or Clippers, as well as fits in Phoenix and Toronto. Nothing looks easy, on paper. What about a return to Golden State? There are some clear obstacles, we learned yesterday. The clock ticks. “The safest thing would be to not go back.” The N.H.L. had 57 Russian players who participated in league play during the 2021-22 season. Now a significant question hangs over the offseason: If those players return to Russia to see their families, will they make it back? The Athletic’s sports journalism is supported by subscribers. To enjoy unlimited access, please subscribe to New York Times All Access or Home Delivery. ARTS AND IDEAS A street-food classic’s moment There’s no such thing as too much fried chicken. The variation currently taking the U.S. by storm: Taiwanese fried chicken, marinated in soy sauce, rice wine and five-spice powder. Chefs are reimagining the street-food staple. They’re tucking Taiwanese fried chicken into sandwiches and steamed buns, serving it atop sliced white bread with pickles and drenching it with sauces in acknowledgment of regional American specialties, Cathy Erway writes in The Times. “It symbolizes Taiwanese cuisine, obviously, but for me, it brings back memories,” said the chef David Kuo, who is based in Los Angeles. “Eating something with bones in front of the TV was the ultimate fun.” PLAY, WATCH, EAT What to Cook David Malosh for The New York Times Here’s how to make Taiwanese fried chicken, which is typically served in paper bags, without sauce, for easy snacking. What to Watch Try any of the year’s best movies so far. What to Read “The Mermaid of Black Conch” by Monique Roffey is equal parts fairy tale, ghost story and history. Now Time to Play The pangram from yesterday’s Spelling Bee was buoyant. Here is today’s puzzle. Here’s today’s Mini Crossword, and a clue: Annoying (five letters). And here’s today’s Wordle. After, use our bot to get better. Thanks for spending part of your morning with The Times. See you tomorrow. — Melissa P.S. Nestor Ramos, a Pulitzer finalist and former Boston Globe columnist, is The Times’s next Metro editor. Here’s today’s front page. There’s no new episode of “The Daily” today. Claire Moses, Ian Prasad Philbrick, Tom Wright-Piersanti and Ashley Wu contributed to The Morning. You can reach the team at themorning@nytimes.com. Sign up here to get this newsletter in your inbox.
  6. phkrause

    THIS DAY IN HISTORY

    THIS DAY IN HISTORY July 4 1776 Continental Congress adopts the Declaration of Independence In Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the Continental Congress adopts the Declaration of Independence, which proclaims the independence of the United States of America from Great Britain and its king. The declaration came 442 days after the first volleys of the American Revolution were fired at Lexington a... read more 19th Century 1884 France gives the Statue of Liberty to the United States Art, Literature, and Film History 1855 First edition of Walt Whitman's "Leaves of Grass" is published Civil War 1863 Confederates surrender at Vicksburg Crime 1954 A sensationalized murder trial inspires "The Fugitive" Natural Disasters & Environment 1911 Heat wave strikes Northeast, killing hundreds Space Exploration 1997 Pathfinder lands on Mars GAY RIGHTS 1965 LGBTQ activists hold the first Annual Reminder demonstration in Philadelphia U.S. Presidents 1826 Thomas Jefferson and John Adams die
  7. phkrause

    Days of Praise

    July 4, 2022 Glorious Liberty “Because the creature itself also shall be delivered from the bondage of corruption into the glorious liberty of the children of God.” (Romans 8:21) This verse contains the first of 11 occurrences of the Greek word eleutheria, “liberty,” and defines the basic spiritual message of this splendid word. Because of sin, God has subjected the whole creation, animate and inanimate, to “the bondage of corruption.” That is, everything is governed by a law of decay—a law of such universal scope that it is recognized as a basic law of science—the law of entropy, stipulating that everything tends to disintegrate and die. Christ died for sin, however, and defeated death so that He will someday deliver the whole groaning creation from its bondage into the glorious freedom from decay and death that will also be enjoyed by all who have received eternal life through faith in Christ. This ultimate, perfect liberty can even now be appropriated in type and principle through looking into “the perfect law of liberty” (James 1:25), the Holy Scriptures. When we become children of God, the Holy Spirit henceforth indwells our bodies, and “where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty” (2 Corinthians 3:17). Sometimes, however, Christians may abuse this new freedom from the law of sin and death, turning it into license, and this becomes a tragic perversion of Christian liberty. “For, brethren, ye have been called unto liberty; only use not liberty for an occasion to the flesh, but by love serve one another” (Galatians 5:13). While not abusing our freedom in Christ, we must nevertheless “stand fast therefore in the liberty wherewith Christ hath made us free” (Galatians 5:1), and look forward to the glorious liberty of the ages to come. HMM
  8. “Was it a car or a cat I saw?” is a palindromic sentence – Neglecting the punctuation, it can be read the same backwards. Have a Happy 4th everyone! James
  9. Gregory Matthews

    U. S. in the Ukraine

    The following article informs as to the U.S. military presence in the Ukraine. https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/in-ukraine-u-s-veterans-step-in-where-the-military-will-not/ar-AAZ9BMb?ocid=msedgdhp&pc=U531&cvid=fef2890e2efd482d87255b28c8878824
  10. (N) according to your faith be healed 🚑 Matthew 9:28-29 And when he was come into the house, the blind men came to him: and Jesus saith unto them, Believe ye that I am able to do this? They said unto him, Yea, Lord. [29] Then touched he their eyes, saying, According to your faith be it unto you.
  11. Yesterday
  12. bonnie

    No Easy Solution

    This is a standard non answer to my question. I was not asking how any one person felt concerning abortion or the right or wrong of having an abortion. What is so sad or to hate about disposing of cells or ???. I asked for an explanation of how a woman is carrying a child if pregnancy is terminated due to domestic violence or a at fault accident by another party. If the same woman is on her way to abortion clinic what transformation takes place that this is no longer a child? With the decriminalization of so many harmful drugs whose business is it what I do with my body? I should be able to take what I want without fear of consequences You seem to be making abortion a religious issue. I didn't imply anything concerning religion, especially a religious issue for SDA. I have heard SDA become more incensed over the consumption of coffee or meat. Just trying to figure out the rationale behind those that favor abortion. You are providing answers to questions that weren't asked
  13. phkrause

    Heroes

    Two Holocaust Heroes Who Risked Their Lives to Save Jews Have Died Both Andree Guelen and Jozef Walaszczyk lived over 100 years and were named Righteous Among the Nations by Yad Vashem. https://aish.com/two-holocaust-heroes-who-risked-their-lives-to-save-jews-have-died/?acid=596077a396aaaede3a05207faf260fbb&src=ac-txt
  14. phkrause

    The New York Times

    July 3, 2022 By David Leonhardt Good morning. At the end of a momentous Supreme Court term, we go behind the scenes. Climate activists gathered at the Supreme Court on Thursday.Anna Rose Layden for The New York Times An unhappy place A few weeks ago, I asked Adam Liptak — The Times’s Supreme Court correspondent — to preview the major cases that would make up the end of the court’s term. Adam was prophetic, correctly forecasting every big ruling. Today, he returns to the newsletter, answering my questions about the behind-the-scenes atmosphere at the court. David: The last few months have been among the most unusual in the Court’s modern history — a major leak followed by an abortion decision that, as you’ve written, will change American life in major ways. Inside the court, do you think things also feel different? Adam: The Supreme Court’s building has been closed to the public since the beginning of the pandemic. Then, not long after the leak in early May of a draft of the opinion that overruled Roe v. Wade, the courthouse was surrounded by an eight-foot fence. Always cloistered and remote, the court is now impenetrable. The release of the decision in the abortion case highlighted another way in which the court has withdrawn from public scrutiny. For unexplained reasons, the justices have stopped announcing their decisions from the bench, abandoning a tradition that is both ceremonial and illuminating. In the old days, the author of the majority opinion would give a quick and conversational summary of the ruling that could be extremely valuable for a reporter on deadline and, by extension, for members of the public trying to understand a decision. More important yet were oral dissents, reserved for decisions that the justices in the minority believed were profoundly mistaken. In ordinary times, one or more of the three liberal justices who dissented in the abortion case would have raised their voices in protest. These days, the court makes do with posting PDFs of its decisions, robbing the occasion of ceremony, drama and insight. The nine justices in 2021.Erin Schaff/The New York Times So the lawyers who argued the cases and the reporters covering the court find out about decisions the same way everybody else does — by refreshing their browsers. But the justices have returned to the courtroom for arguments, haven’t they? Yes, they have taken a different approach with arguments. After hearing them by telephone for much of the pandemic, the justices returned to the bench in October. Reporters with Supreme Court press credentials were allowed to attend and the public could listen to live-streamed audio on the court’s website. It is not clear why opinions could not be announced in similar fashion. I haven’t been to the courthouse since the last argument of the current term, on April 27, when Chief Justice John Roberts grew emotional in saying farewell to a retiring colleague, Justice Stephen Breyer. But there is every reason to think that the leak, the investigation it prompted, the controversy over Justice Clarence Thomas’s failure to recuse himself from a case that intersected with his wife’s efforts to overturn the election and the justices’ very real security concerns have made the court an unhappy place. In remarks in May, not long after the leak, Justice Thomas reflected on how things had changed at the court since an 11-year stretch without changes in its membership before the arrival of Chief Justice Roberts in 2005. “This is not the court of that era,” Justice Thomas said, adding: “We actually trusted each other. We may have been a dysfunctional family, but we were a family.” A less collegial court seems like it could be especially problematic for the three liberal justices. There are now five Republican-appointed justices who are even more conservative than Roberts. If the court is a less collaborative place, I would imagine it gives the justices in the minority — both the liberals and, in some cases, Roberts — less ability to shape decisions. Yes, though it’s possible to overstate the power of collegiality. Justices cast votes based on the strength of the relevant arguments and the desired outcomes, not on how likable their colleagues are. The justices say there is no vote-trading across cases, and I believe them. On the other hand, there are certainly negotiations within cases. It seems tolerably clear, for instance, that Justices Breyer and Elena Kagan shifted positions in one part of the 2012 case that upheld a key portion of the Affordable Care Act to make certain they would secure Chief Justice Roberts’s vote on another part. Justices may well be prepared to narrow or reshape a draft opinion that seeks to speak for a five-justice majority in exchange for a vote. But once the author has gotten to five, the value of another potential vote plummets. It is that dynamic that must worry the court’s liberals. Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson was sworn in on Thursday.U.S. Supreme Court Via Reuters On Thursday, Justice Breyer officially retired and helped swear in his replacement, Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson. How do the justices typically welcome a new member? When a new justice joins the Supreme Court, tradition requires the second-most junior justice to arrange a little party. In 2006, for instance, when Justice SamuelAlito came on board, that task fell to Justice Breyer, who knew his new colleague to be a Phillies fan. Before dessert was served, Justice Breyer introduced a special guest: the Phillie Phanatic, the team’s mascot. This year, Justice Amy Coney Barrett is the second-most junior justice and will presumably be in charge of the welcoming celebration for Justice Jackson. And now that the court is on a break until October, what do the justices usually do? They often teach courses in exotic places. In 2012, for instance, after voting to uphold the Affordable Care Act, Chief Justice Roberts left for Malta to teach a two-week class on the history of the Supreme Court. “Malta, as you know, is an impregnable island fortress,” he said. “It seemed like a good idea.” More about Adam Liptak: He started his Times career as a copy boy in 1984, fetching coffee for editors and occasionally writing. After law school and a stint at a Wall Street law firm, he returned to the paper in 1992, joining its corporate legal department before moving to the newsroom as a reporter a decade later. He reads a lot and plays a lot of poker. More on the court The Supreme Court’s latest term was its most conservative since 1931, as these graphics by Alicia Parlapiano demonstrate. Dysfunction in Congress has given the court inordinate power, Adam writes. NEWS The Latest Gravediggers at the Lychakiv military cemetery in Lviv, Ukraine.Emile Ducke for The New York Times Russia claimed to have seized Lysychansk, a prize city in Ukraine’s east, and blamed Ukraine for explosions that rocked a Russian border town. Here’s the latest. Ukrainian men volunteered to protect their homes. Now, many of these untrained soldiers are dying on the other side of the country. For months, Russia has pummeled Ukrainian civilians — and offered excuses to dodge responsibility. The investigation into Russian war crimes, by Ukrainian and international agencies, may be the largest in history. The rising price of fuel is hitting poorer countries especially hard, with many residents struggling to keep the lights on or cook food. Other Big Stories The school police chief in Uvalde, Texas, resigned from the city council amid continued outrage over officers’ slow response to the school shooting. A cohort of young women — many of them Christian, some of them progressive — are fighting against abortion. Holiday headache: Thousands of flights were delayed as travel reaches prepandemic levels. Tropical Storm Colin is bringing heavy rain to the Carolinas. FROM OPINION Restricting abortion access will hurt rich women, too, says Elizabeth Spiers. The far right and far left both think women don’t count, Pamela Paul argues. Margaret Renkl fears for American democracy. She’s reclaiming the flag anyway. The Sunday question: Is Roe’s fall transforming the midterms? Commentary’s Noah Rothman has doubts, arguing that crime and inflation remain voters’ top concerns. CNN’s Harry Enten thinks the ruling could lift Democrats in state-level races, whose winners will shape whether abortion is legal. Support the reporting behind The Morning. A subscription to The Times helps bring the facts to light. Subscribe today. MORNING READS Hundreds of types of mangoes grow from a single tree.Saumya Khandelwal for The New York Times Mango man: After 82 years, his days are spent taking care of the tree he loves. Other worlds: The powerful new James Webb Space Telescope will search for signs of life in the universe. Frozen: A baby woolly mammoth, preserved in the ground for more than 30,000 years. Culture wars: Solveig Gold is proud to be the wife of a “canceled” Princeton professor. Sunday routine: Anthony Almojera, a paramedic, cooks a family meal at Station 40 in Sunset Park, Brooklyn. Advice from Wirecutter: The best beach gear. A Times classic: The un-divorced. BOOKS Fiction in the city: Contemporary authors shared their favorite New York City novels. By the Book: Alice Elliott Dark ruins books by reading them in the bathtub. Our editors’ picks: The history of the bicycle, and nine other new books. Times best sellers: Riley Sager’s “The House Across the Lake” settles in this week on our hardcover fiction best-seller list. See all our lists. The Book Review podcast: Gabrielle Zevin discusses her new novel, “Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow,” about two friends who design a video game. THE SUNDAY TIMES MAGAZINE Photo illustration by Justin Metz. On the cover: Moderate Democrats are going extinct. Rituals: How do you prepare for a school shooting? Recommendation: The Instagram account @b_a_l_l_h_a_u_s will change how you see basketball. Diagnosis: He could barely walk and had to give up golf. What was wrong? Eat: In Hawaii, mac salad isn’t just a side dish; it’s a condiment unto itself. Read the full issue. THE WEEK AHEAD What to Watch For A law banning nearly all abortions in Mississippi is set to take effect on Thursday. Here’s our tracker of abortion laws across the country. President Biden will award the Presidential Medal of Freedom to 17 people on Thursday, including Simone Biles, Denzel Washington and John McCain. Much of the country is in for a hot and humid next couple days. Tomorrow Independence Day is celebrated in the U.S., and millions of Americans will be traveling. Expect delays. What to Cook This Week Beatriz Da Costa for The New York Times If you’ve had your fill of burgers and hot dogs, Emily Weinstein recommends Pati Jinich’s Sonoran carne asada tacos. NOW TIME TO PLAY Here’s a clue from the Sunday crossword: 113 Across: Space heater Take the news quiz to see how well you followed the week’s headlines. Here’s today’s Spelling Bee. Here’s today’s Wordle. After, use our bot to get better. Thanks for spending part of your weekend with The Times. — David Claire Moses, Ian Prasad Philbrick, Tom Wright-Piersanti and Ashley Wu contributed to The Morning. You can reach the team at themorning@nytimes.com. Sign up here to get this newsletter in your inbox. July 3, 2022 By David Leonhardt Good afternoon. This morning’s newsletter had technical problems that made the Q. and A. hard to read, so we are sending it again. Climate activists gathered at the Supreme Court on Thursday.Anna Rose Layden for The New York Times An unhappy place A few weeks ago, I asked Adam Liptak — The Times’s Supreme Court correspondent — to preview the major cases that would make up the end of the court’s term. Adam was prophetic, correctly forecasting every big ruling. Today, he returns to the newsletter, answering my questions about the behind-the-scenes atmosphere at the court. David: The last few months have been among the most unusual in the Court’s modern history — a major leak followed by an abortion decision that, as you’ve written, will change American life in major ways. Inside the court, do you think things also feel different? Adam: The Supreme Court’s building has been closed to the public since the beginning of the pandemic. Then, not long after the leak in early May of a draft of the opinion that overruled Roe v. Wade, the courthouse was surrounded by an eight-foot fence. Always cloistered and remote, the court is now impenetrable. The release of the decision in the abortion case highlighted another way in which the court has withdrawn from public scrutiny. For unexplained reasons, the justices have stopped announcing their decisions from the bench, abandoning a tradition that is both ceremonial and illuminating. In the old days, the author of the majority opinion would give a quick and conversational summary of the ruling that could be extremely valuable for a reporter on deadline and, by extension, for members of the public trying to understand a decision. More important yet were oral dissents, reserved for decisions that the justices in the minority believed were profoundly mistaken. In ordinary times, one or more of the three liberal justices who dissented in the abortion case would have raised their voices in protest. These days, the court makes do with posting PDFs of its decisions, robbing the occasion of ceremony, drama and insight. The nine justices in 2021.Erin Schaff/The New York Times So the lawyers who argued the cases and the reporters covering the court find out about decisions the same way everybody else does — by refreshing their browsers. But the justices have returned to the courtroom for arguments, haven’t they? Yes, they have taken a different approach with arguments. After hearing them by telephone for much of the pandemic, the justices returned to the bench in October. Reporters with Supreme Court press credentials were allowed to attend and the public could listen to live-streamed audio on the court’s website. It is not clear why opinions could not be announced in similar fashion. I haven’t been to the courthouse since the last argument of the current term, on April 27, when Chief Justice John Roberts grew emotional in saying farewell to a retiring colleague, Justice Stephen Breyer. But there is every reason to think that the leak, the investigation it prompted, the controversy over Justice Clarence Thomas’s failure to recuse himself from a case that intersected with his wife’s efforts to overturn the election and the justices’ very real security concerns have made the court an unhappy place. In remarks in May, not long after the leak, Justice Thomas reflected on how things had changed at the court since an 11-year stretch without changes in its membership before the arrival of Chief Justice Roberts in 2005. “This is not the court of that era,” Justice Thomas said, adding: “We actually trusted each other. We may have been a dysfunctional family, but we were a family.” A less collegial court seems like it could be especially problematic for the three liberal justices. There are now five Republican-appointed justices who are even more conservative than Roberts. If the court is a less collaborative place, I would imagine it gives the justices in the minority — both the liberals and, in some cases, Roberts — less ability to shape decisions. Yes, though it’s possible to overstate the power of collegiality. Justices cast votes based on the strength of the relevant arguments and the desired outcomes, not on how likable their colleagues are. The justices say there is no vote-trading across cases, and I believe them. On the other hand, there are certainly negotiations within cases. It seems tolerably clear, for instance, that Justices Breyer and Elena Kagan shifted positions in one part of the 2012 case that upheld a key portion of the Affordable Care Act to make certain they would secure Chief Justice Roberts’s vote on another part. Justices may well be prepared to narrow or reshape a draft opinion that seeks to speak for a five-justice majority in exchange for a vote. But once the author has gotten to five, the value of another potential vote plummets. It is that dynamic that must worry the court’s liberals. Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson was sworn in on Thursday.U.S. Supreme Court Via Reuters On Thursday, Justice Breyer officially retired and helped swear in his replacement, Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson. How do the justices typically welcome a new member? When a new justice joins the Supreme Court, tradition requires the second-most junior justice to arrange a little party. In 2006, for instance, when Justice SamuelAlito came on board, that task fell to Justice Breyer, who knew his new colleague to be a Phillies fan. Before dessert was served, Justice Breyer introduced a special guest: the Phillie Phanatic, the team’s mascot. This year, Justice Amy Coney Barrett is the second-most junior justice and will presumably be in charge of the welcoming celebration for Justice Jackson. And now that the court is on a break until October, what do the justices usually do? They often teach courses in exotic places. In 2012, for instance, after voting to uphold the Affordable Care Act, Chief Justice Roberts left for Malta to teach a two-week class on the history of the Supreme Court. “Malta, as you know, is an impregnable island fortress,” he said. “It seemed like a good idea.” More about Adam Liptak: He started his Times career as a copy boy in 1984, fetching coffee for editors and occasionally writing. After law school and a stint at a Wall Street law firm, he returned to the paper in 1992, joining its corporate legal department before moving to the newsroom as a reporter a decade later. He reads a lot and plays a lot of poker. More on the court The Supreme Court’s latest term was its most conservative since 1931, as these graphics by Alicia Parlapiano demonstrate. Dysfunction in Congress has given the court inordinate power, Adam writes. NEWS The Latest Gravediggers at the Lychakiv military cemetery in Lviv, Ukraine.Emile Ducke for The New York Times Russia claimed to have seized Lysychansk, a prize city in Ukraine’s east, and blamed Ukraine for explosions that rocked a Russian border town. Here’s the latest. Ukrainian men volunteered to protect their homes. Now, many of these untrained soldiers are dying on the other side of the country. For months, Russia has pummeled Ukrainian civilians — and offered excuses to dodge responsibility. The investigation into Russian war crimes, by Ukrainian and international agencies, may be the largest in history. The rising price of fuel is hitting poorer countries especially hard, with many residents struggling to keep the lights on or cook food. Other Big Stories The school police chief in Uvalde, Texas, resigned from the city council amid continued outrage over officers’ slow response to the school shooting. A cohort of young women — many of them Christian, some of them progressive — are fighting against abortion. Holiday headache: Thousands of flights were delayed as travel reaches prepandemic levels. Tropical Storm Colin is bringing heavy rain to the Carolinas. FROM OPINION Restricting abortion access will hurt rich women, too, says Elizabeth Spiers. The far right and far left both think women don’t count, Pamela Paul argues. Margaret Renkl fears for American democracy. She’s reclaiming the flag anyway. The Sunday question: Is Roe’s fall transforming the midterms? Commentary’s Noah Rothman has doubts, arguing that crime and inflation remain voters’ top concerns. CNN’s Harry Enten thinks the ruling could lift Democrats in state-level races, whose winners will shape whether abortion is legal. Support the reporting behind The Morning. A subscription to The Times helps bring the facts to light. Subscribe today. MORNING READS Hundreds of types of mangoes grow from a single tree.Saumya Khandelwal for The New York Times Mango man: After 82 years, his days are spent taking care of the tree he loves. Other worlds: The powerful new James Webb Space Telescope will search for signs of life in the universe. Frozen: A baby woolly mammoth, preserved in the ground for more than 30,000 years. Culture wars: Solveig Gold is proud to be the wife of a “canceled” Princeton professor. Sunday routine: Anthony Almojera, a paramedic, cooks a family meal at Station 40 in Sunset Park, Brooklyn. Advice from Wirecutter: The best beach gear. A Times classic: The un-divorced. BOOKS Fiction in the city: Contemporary authors shared their favorite New York City novels. By the Book: Alice Elliott Dark ruins books by reading them in the bathtub. Our editors’ picks: The history of the bicycle, and nine other new books. Times best sellers: Riley Sager’s “The House Across the Lake” settles in this week on our hardcover fiction best-seller list. See all our lists. The Book Review podcast: Gabrielle Zevin discusses her new novel, “Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow,” about two friends who design a video game. THE SUNDAY TIMES MAGAZINE Photo illustration by Justin Metz. On the cover: Moderate Democrats are going extinct. Rituals: How do you prepare for a school shooting? Recommendation: The Instagram account @b_a_l_l_h_a_u_s will change how you see basketball. Diagnosis: He could barely walk and had to give up golf. What was wrong? Eat: In Hawaii, mac salad isn’t just a side dish; it’s a condiment unto itself. Read the full issue. THE WEEK AHEAD What to Watch For A law banning nearly all abortions in Mississippi is set to take effect on Thursday. Here’s our tracker of abortion laws across the country. President Biden will award the Presidential Medal of Freedom to 17 people on Thursday, including Simone Biles, Denzel Washington and John McCain. Much of the country is in for a hot and humid next couple days. Tomorrow Independence Day is celebrated in the U.S., and millions of Americans will be traveling. Expect delays. What to Cook This Week Beatriz Da Costa for The New York Times If you’ve had your fill of burgers and hot dogs, Emily Weinstein recommends Pati Jinich’s Sonoran carne asada tacos. NOW TIME TO PLAY Here’s a clue from the Sunday crossword: 113 Across: Space heater Take the news quiz to see how well you followed the week’s headlines. Here’s today’s Spelling Bee. Here’s today’s Wordle. After, use our bot to get better. Thanks for spending part of your weekend with The Times. — David Claire Moses, Ian Prasad Philbrick, Tom Wright-Piersanti and Ashley Wu contributed to The Morning. You can reach the team at themorning@nytimes.com. Sign up here to get this newsletter in your inbox.
  15. phkrause

    Uvalde

    Uvalde schools’ police chief resigns from City Council The Uvalde school district’s police chief has stepped down from his position in the City Council just weeks after being sworn in following allegations that he erred in his response to the mass shooting at Robb Elementary School that left 19 students and two teachers dead. https://apnews.com/article/police-shootings-texas-education-government-and-politics-61ce193de8e0b4a87211cdb9343224a2?
  16. phkrause

    COVID Again

    For now, wary US treads water with transformed COVID-19 The fast-changing coronavirus has kicked off summer in the U.S. with lots of infections but relatively few deaths compared to its prior incarnations. https://apnews.com/article/covid-science-health-infectious-diseases-fb25f987bab09a11be31a32e832dd9de?
  17. Russia claims control of pivotal eastern Ukrainian province KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Russia claimed control Sunday over the last Ukrainian stronghold in an eastern province that is key to achieving a major goal of Moscow’s grinding war. https://apnews.com/article/russia-ukraine-kyiv-donetsk-c65edd033ee98362f031327ff748e31d?
  18. phkrause

    THIS DAY IN HISTORY

    THIS DAY IN HISTORY July 3 1863 Battle of Gettysburg ends On the third day of the Battle of Gettysburg, Confederate General Robert E. Lee's last attempt at breaking the Union line ends in disastrous failure, bringing the most decisive battle of the American Civil War to an end. In June 1863, following his masterful victory at the Battle of Chancellorsville... read more 1980s 1988 U.S. warship downs Iranian passenger jet American Revolution 1775 George Washington takes command of Continental Army Art, Literature, and Film History 1969 Brian Jones and Jim Morrison die, two years apart to the day Crime 1989 A mother is arrested and accused of killing her four children Middle East 1990 Pilgrim stampede kills 1,400 19th CENTURY 1887 Gunfighter Clay Allison killed U.S. Presidents 1958 President Eisenhower initiates federal flood-control program Westward Expansion 1890 Idaho becomes 43rd state World War I 1918 Mohammed V, sultan of Turkey, dies
  19. phkrause

    Days of Praise

    July 3, 2022 Worshiping God “And Abraham said unto his young men, Abide ye here with the ass; and I and the lad will go yonder and worship, and come again to you.” (Genesis 22:5) We tend to think of “worship” as singing, or testimonies, or hearing a message. This could hardly be the meaning in our text, however, for Abraham was intending to offer Isaac on a sacrificial altar in accordance with God’s command. Furthermore, Isaac was willing to be offered. “They went both of them together” (vv. 6, 8). Isaac, in fact, was not just a little boy at this time. The word “lad” in our text is the same word as “young men” in the same verse. The first time the Hebrew word for “worship” is used is in Genesis 18:2. When Abraham saw three men approaching (later revealed as the Lord and two angels), he “bowed himself toward the ground.” Thus, “worship” means, essentially, “bow down” in obedience to the will of the one deserving “worship.” Abraham’s supreme act of worship, however, was his willingness even to sacrifice his beloved son, if God’s will so required. He trusted so fully in God that he knew “God was able to raise him up, even from the dead” (Hebrews 11:19), and so he could tell his two servants that he and Isaac would “come again to you.” No wonder Abraham is called “the father of all them that believe” (Romans 4:11). He was, indeed, “strong in faith” (v. 20). The New Testament Greek word for “worship” also means essentially to bow down to God’s will. It occurs first when the wise men came to King Herod seeking the infant Savior, saying: “We...are come to worship him” (Matthew 2:2). As long ago a great man on Earth bowed down to the three from heaven, so now these great men on Earth with their three precious gifts bow down to One from heaven, the One who alone is worthy of true worship. HMM
  20. Thoughtful believers live with a tension. On the one hand, believers, by definition, feel like they have enough evidence to make serious commitments regarding the Bible, theological positions, or a particular denomination. At the same time, thoughtful believers have a scholarly side that recognizes that they have a lot to learn and that on some […] The post Thoughtful Believer/Scholars and the Fate of Sinners (Rev 20) appeared first on Jon Paulien's Blog. View the full article
  21. MINISTERS OF THE NEW COVENANT When we use the Bible primarily as a way of proving some doctrine or point of view or to bash people we miss out on the Life of God which flows through the Scriptures. Paul expresses it well in 2 Corinthians 3:6, ". . . who also made us sufficient as ministers of the new covenant, not of the letter but of the Spirit; for THE LETTER KILLS, BUT THE SPIRIT GIVES LIFE."--2 Corinthians 3:6 (NKJV—caps supplied). As ministers of the New Covenant we will be known for our kindness, compassion, and love for others above everything else. "Where do we begin? Begin with the heart.”--Julian of Norwich (an English writer of the Middle Ages) For more thoughts read THE PURPOSES OF THE BIBLE on the link below: https://advaita.proboards.com/thread/283/purposes-bible
  22. Kevin H

    Military Service?

    I am grateful for my years in the military, but I have to admit that I don't know if I could have served in a combat (as opposed to say something medical or chaplaincy or other nurturing) position. These are questions that are asked by people over history; questions that need to be asked. We may not always have the correct answers, we may often have the wrong answers, but we need to keep asking, thinking, and looking at how others have dealt with this situation. As a child, I was wondering what the "Snoopy vs. the Red Baron" in song, games and TV, thinking that the Red Baron must have been world war I's version of Hitler, some big burly bully. My mom got me a book on the Red Baron and was surprised that he was simply a young man trying his best to serve his country and his troops. That he was a very caring man. Some historians wonder if stories about his gallantry had been exaggerated, but that still shows that there was something there to start with. While I'd come across the effect that this other pilot had on his life, for some reason I never caught that pilot's name and never looked him up until 2018 as I was reading up on von Richtofen (the Red Baron) as we were approaching the centennial of his death, and for some reason finally decided to learn something about the man who was a hero to one of my childhood heroes. When I finally looked into this pilot, Oswald Boelcke, I was simply blown away by what I learned. Boelcke was a strong Christian. He was one of the few who had a character that made him a hero on both sides of the trenches, and it is quite amazing to have people who you are killing and trying to kill you to see you as a hero and role model. Boelcke never called the allies the enemy, but victims of politics, just as the Germans were. He would remind his men that if they were born in England or France that they would be flying against him instead of with him, and same if he was born in England or France, and thus demanded the men under his command respect those they meet in combat. For his victims he would see that they had a full military funeral with pictures for the family and an awareness of where their loved one was resting to visit or recover the body after the war. For survivors he (and so did Richtofen) would visit them in the hospital and see what he could do for them. They would not allow those under them to take personal items from those they shot down, they could take souvenirs of the plane, but personal items were either turned over to the Red Cross, or if need be, face anti-aircraft fire to be delivered back to the unit for return to the family. I don't know if Richtofen did this, but Boelcke would visit the POW camps to give care packages to make the sting of being a POW easier on them. Several allied pilots who either survived and met Boelcke in the hospital, or who met him at the POW camps, as they got older would say that, despite knowing that they could have been killed, that a highlight of their life was meeting this amazing man, and knew that they were in the presence of greatness. (Interestingly when Richtofen first saw Boelcke he though there was nothing impressive about this man except that he shot down enemy planes. But he soon learned that Boelcke's greatness came from his humility, making everyone else feel like they were his best friend and making others feel important.) The fact that Richtofen tried to follow in Boelcke's giant footsteps says a log about Richtofen's character. Richtofen was the perfect foil for Snoopy: interesting names: Sopwith Camel, Red Baron. But not some underserving bully who was constantly winning against Snoopy, but a decent human being who was on the opposite side in the war. I'm grateful how Charles Shultz for keeping his memory alive. We need to be aware of people like Richtofen, Boelcke, Doss, Hassel and others who dealt with the issues of warfare and still wanting to be decent humans. It will be interesting to listen to discussions between these people either on the way to, or as we first get into heaven and work with our questions.
  23. Kevin H

    No Easy Solution

    I hate abortion, but I hate even more the deaths from self attempts to abort or if something goes wrong with an illegal abortion situation. We have the ability to fight abortion by working with the women who may be interested in an abortion and assist them in getting through what ever they are dealing with, and showing care to them as individuals. Sadly, we don't want to do serve people on a grass roots, personal level. We just want the government to do our job for us by impersonally having the government force our will upon the population as a whole. 2 Timothy 3:5 tells us that in the last days people will have a form of godliness but deny it's power-- the power of the Holy Spirit, the power of caring and love. We saw the papacy as wrong because of how they forced religion on the population instead of going after the power of the unassuming nature of God, and the principles of the non-use of force in most situations. Al Smith lost his presidential bid for reasons that included the fear that since he was a Catholic that he would use his position to force Catholic beliefs on to the country. John Kennedy pointed out that he knew the difference between being a Catholic politician and being a politician who worshiped in the Catholic church. Today's politicians need to learn from what Kennedy understood. Is there anything that fits so perfect into the events of eschatology: Satan appealing by the use of force in a way that appeals to those who are interested in religion, and to get those who see the danger in this act to think that they need to reject religion to avoid this error.
  24. Kevin H

    Adventism in the 1960s & 1970s

    Excellent article!!! Just ordered the book. Robert Person begat Neal Wilson, although Neal Wilson was grudgingly more willing to suffer under the variations within Adventism. Neal Wilson begat Ted Wilson who wanted to be more like Uncle Robert. Now, some versions of progressive Adventism was a mish-mash of evidence and trying to fit the evidence into the ideas of fundamentalism; especially the two extremes of the militant fundamentalists, such as we find in the so-called "Historic Adventists" and the other extreme of wanting to show that we are typical evangelicals and that light to God's church ended with the reformation (this is still a version of Fundamentalism). Between these two views there has been much growth in Biblical studies, and understanding the message of Mrs. White, which are given in methods that these two views feel very uncomfortable in using, and which Elder Person and our current Elder Wilson are trying to stomp out.
  25. Gregory Matthews

    Paul Anderson on Military Service

    Tom, your position is one that should be respected and quite acceptable within the SDA denomination. You were not alone in taking that position. Personally, I would have greater agreement if you had stated that in your understanding is against the Biblical teachings and the Christian should have no part in war. I could find other positions against war to which I would have greater agreement with you if you were to take them. My greatest disagreement with you is in your understanding as to what it meant to take the oath. In the U.S. system that oath is modified by the fact that people who develop conscientious objections to the requirements of their military service after they enlist are allowed to leave military service with an honorable discharge. In my military service, I helped a number of people, both SDA and members of other denominations be discharged from the service with an honorable discharge due to the fact that they had developed conscientious objections (Religious) to their requirements as to how they should perform that service. I served for 20+ years on active duty in the U.S. Army. and also in a National Guard unit and in a Reserve unit. In those Reserve units I did not drill on Saturday ever. I do not advocate that a so-called traditional SDA enlist in the U.S. military. I tell traditional SDAs not to enlist. So, do not misunderstand me. A traditional SDA will likely have religious problems. So, there is a sense in which you are correct. I acknowledge that. But, in one sense your position does not reflect the whole story.
  26. That is easy, first of all give up the heresy of fundamentalism. Now I do have a question, I may have missed this, but what is the source for Mrs. White's quote about the "amalgamation of man and beast observed in certain races of men?" I'm not saying that she did not make this statement, but from years ago when I looked into this I did not see her saying those exact words, only talking about the amalgamations taking place in general before the flood. Now I did come upon second hand statements that Uriah Smith made at least a similar if not the exact statement that you shared, and that there were people confusing the two, or assuming that since Smith held this view that Mrs. White must have assumed the idea in her more general statements. Even if this is an exact quote, along with her statements of volcanoes, causes of earthquakes, her commenting on the good Jewish people keeping the pigs at the sea of Galilee (This was a Gentile section), her comments about the innkeeper (the word "Inn" in Luke 2 was a guess word for translators. The word does not mean "inn" and never did. the "kataluma" was a room in the family home for out of town relatives to stay in when visiting). once again: 1.) the first step is to give up the heresy of Fundamentalism. 2.) Then the second step is see if this was an isolated statement, or did she use it early in her ministry and move away from it, or is it something that she kept building upon, or wrote balancing statements about. 3.) The third step is did she quote someone else (While there was stricter footnoting for scholarly work, when she started her ministry it was very common for the lay books to copy from each other and other books without the footnoting. At Andrews they had a couple of sets of her books that were color coded for literary borrowing. I wish that the church would just make her works available in a color coding editions that we can at least have computer access.) If she did copy it, we ask if this was a statement that she really wanted to make, or was it a statement in passing to bring a running narrative to the next point she found important. 4.) Was this statement central to any of her specific ministry themes at the time. 4a.) First, all her visions were that Adventists should not dismiss the Millerite Movement as not being lead of God and that they were merely having a false experience. Did she write this statement during this time period? If so, what does this quote have to do with encouraging Adventists to not give up their experience? 4b.) The second stage of her ministry was the formation of the Seventh-day Adventist church. Were these statements written during this time period? If so, what does this quote have to do with the formation of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Questions such as how to work a city etc. We can also later add here the reorganization of the General Conference in 1902. 4c.) The third stage of her ministry was organizing the health and educational work. Again was this quote written during this time period and if so what does the quote have to do with organizing the health and medical work? 4d.) Finally, does it have anything to do in the development of her great controversy philosophy? 4e.) Transcending all these stages, was the quote urgent for a personal testimony? 5.) Is she giving principle or application? As in the Bible, the principles are absolute, but the applications are not absolute. 6.) She says that her job was to make applications to her day, not to give an exegesis of the text. She says that the exegesis of a text (what it meant back when it was written) was our job to study. Mrs. White tells how her inspiration gave her a framework, often like seeing photos, then she had to study to fill in the details. She tells us what visions did do and did not do for her, what is significant and what is insignificant. Sadly, we refused her counsel on this topic since we have a neutronic need to want to prove to the world that we are good Baptists, the perfect Fundamentalists. I've also noticed that when ever someone wants to show problems in her writings, they pull from the area that she says we will find problems.
  27. Tom Durst

    Paul Anderson on Military Service

    In 1957 when I was 20 I decided that I could not take the military oath that is required and enter the military in any capacity including that of a medic. I applied for the I-0 on my own with no one to help me. I still have a carbon copy of my paperwork that I filed with Selective Service. The FBI checked all of my references and I got the I-0. At that time I-0 folks would serve in a government approved civilian capacity for two years and had to be 50 or more miles from. I had joined an Adventist offshoot group called the Seventh Day Adventist Reform Movement during my decision making process. I was called to the ministry in that denomination and was given a ministerial exemption of IV-D by the SS. I have never regretted my not participating in the military. For me to take a military oath that I would obey the commander-in-chief (USA President) or superior officers in all of their commands would be to sell my soul. I realize that my stand about this is contrary to most of Christianity but I must follow my conscience whether others understand it or not. Most men that I know have all kinds of military service benefits, discounts, etc. but God has provided for all of my needs in many way, often totally unexpected. Our country extends much honor and benefits for those who serve in the military and I certainly have no issue with that. I respect other people's beliefs with no judgment whatsoever.
  28. (N) I will heal him ❤️‍🩹 Isaiah 57:19 I create the fruit of the lips; Peace, peace to him that is far off, and to him that is near, saith the Lord ; and I will heal him.
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