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Suzanne Sutton

Eat to Beat Alzheimer's

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Suzanne Sutton

Researchers have shown that if you have a genetic vulnerability to Alzheimer's, eating a greasy diet (more than 40 percent of calories from fat) may increase your risk of getting the disease by 7 times.<P>"We suspect that the damage caused by a high-fat diet happens earlier in life and only shows up later as Alzheimer's," says nutrition researcher Grace Petot, of Case Western Reserve Univ. in Cleveland. Here is another reason why eating less fat is smart. --<I>Presented at the World Alzheimer's Congress, July 2000.</I><P>This info is in line with work done at our own Loma Linda University. Here researchers showed that the frequency of Alzheimer's among vegetarians is less than one-half as much as in meat eaters. --<I>Neuroepidemiology, 11:28-36, 1993.</I><P><p>[:"#800080"][This message has been edited by Suzanne Sutton (edited December 05, 2000).]</font>

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Suzanne Sutton

Exercise helps too! It's never too early or too late to start an exercise program.<P><B>Dr. Andrew Weil's Self-Healing, Apr. 1999, (a health newsletter):</B><P>A 1998 study by researchers at Case Western Reserve University showed that people who kept active in midlife were far less likely to develop Alzheimer's.<P><B>Report from the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Neurology:</B><P>Elderly people who say they regularly engaged in activities such as running, tennis, racquetball, weight training, ice skating, golf, swimming or biking in their younger years have a lower risk for Alzheimer's.<P>Good health to all,<BR>-Suzanne

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Suzanne Sutton

Eating Soy Foods May Reduce Alzheimer's Disease Risk

Besides offering protection against high cholesterol and heart disease, eating soy foods may also protect against Alzheimer's disease. That's what researchers from the Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, noted recently at a meeting of the American Chemical Society.

In their 3-year experimental study, soy isoflavones were able to reduce protein changes in the brain that are considered to be markers for the onset of Alzheimer's disease. Study leader Helen Kim, Ph.D., says that 2 or 3 servings of soy protein (about 25 grams), which is already known to reduce heart disease risk, may well also be the amount required for inhibiting Alzheimer's disease onset.

Suzanne

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Suzanne Sutton

Preventing Alzheimer's con't

A recent study (Archives of Neurology, Feb. 2003), on fats add to the growing evidence that the same type of diet that protects the heart, also benefits the brain. This study led by researcher Martha Clare Morris at Chicago's Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center involved over 800 Chicago residents 65 and older. The group was asked about their eating habits. Followup tests nearly 4 years later found that 131 participants had developed Alzheimer's

Participants who reported consuming large quantities of saturated fats as found in animal-based products including meat and butter, faced double the risk of having Alzheimer's compared with those who ate small amounts. That risk was found for those who ate an average 25 grams of saturated fats daily; one tablespoon of butter has about 7 grams.

Conversely, those who consumed polyunsaturated, and monounsaturated fats as found in vegetables and nuts, faced a 70 percent reduction in Alzheimer's risk. --adapted from the Riverside, Calif. Press-Enterprise, February 18, 2003.

~Suzanne~

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Shirley

All good reports, Suzanne. I appreciate them.

Mopsie

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Suzanne Sutton

Stretch Your Mind

Dharma Singh Khalsa, MD, reminds us that "because the brain is flesh and blood, just like your heart, it will respond to things that we can do for it." Dr. Khalsa, president and medical director of the Alzheimer's Prevention Foundation International, says Alzheimer's begins an average of 30 years before the onset of symptoms and a combination of regular physical and mental exercises can reduce risk of developing the disease by as much as 70%

He recommends at least 30 minutes of aerobic exercise and weight training 3 to 4 times a week and "brain aerobic exercises" such as discussing current events or other topics you read about, enjoying music, art, or other hobbies; learning a new language or computer skills; shopping by memory; and volunteering.

Other key factors that can extend memory and reverse decline are stress management, a correct diet--plenty of plant foods and healthy fats but little or no saturated fat--and daily preventive supplements, such as a high-pootency multivitamin, vitamins C (2,000 mg) and E (400 to 800 IU), and C0Q10 (100 mg). Dosages are higher for those already experiencing memory loss --adapted from GreatLife, December 4, 2004.

Comment: Don't forget a most important factor--the study of the Bible. "The mind occupied with commonplace matters only, becomes dwarfed and enfeebled. If never tasked to comprehend grand and far-reaching truths, it after a time loses the power of growth. As a safeguard against this degeneracy, and a stimulus to development, nothing else can equal the study of God's Word. As a means of intellectual training, the Bible is more effective than any other book, or all other books combined. The greatness of its themes, the dignified simplicity of its utterances, the beauty of its imagery, quicken and uplift the thoughts as nothing else can. No other study can impart such meantal power as does the effort to grasp the stupendous truths of revelation. The mind thus brought in contact with the thoughts of the Infinite cannot but expand and strengthen." Ellen White, Education, p. 124.

Suzanne

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Suzanne Sutton

You've Got to Exercise!

In Hawaii, retired men from the ages of 71 to 93 who walked less than a quarter-mile a day were almost twice as likely to develop dementia, including Alzheimer's, as those who walked more than 2 miles daily. Even a little walking helps a lot; among older women, those who walked 1 and a half hours a week did better on mental-function tests than those who did not walk at all. --Journal of the American Medical Association, Sept. 22, 2004.

More and more research is showing that regular exercise is an important factor in preventing Alzheimer's. Isn't it time you started a walking program? Indeed, walking is the best exercise...No it doesn't have to be some kind of gut-busting activity that destroys all your good intentions. Let's get with it!!!!

Suzanne

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Suzanne Sutton

This is Serious!

Yes, Alzheimer's is extremely serious. What can we do NOW to prevent this devastating malady as we age. The previously mentioned research is vital. At the same time Inspiration has much to offer on the subject:

"The mind does not wear out nor break down so often on account of diligent employment and hard study, as on account of eating improper food at improper times, and of careless inattention to the laws of health....Irregular hours for eating and sleeping sap the brain forces. The apostle Paul declares that he who would be successful in reaching a high standard of godliness must be temperate in all things. Eating, drinking, and dressing all have a direct bearing upon our spiritual advancement.

"Health is a blessing which few appreciate....Many eat at all hours, regardless of the laws of health. Then gloom covers the mind. How can men be honored with divine enlightenment when they are so reckless in their habits, so inattentive to the light which God has given in regard to these things....Life is a holy trust, which God alone can enable us to keep, and to use to His glory. But He who formed the wonderful structure of the body will take special care to keep it in order if men do not work at cross-purposes with Him.

"Health, life, and happiness are the result of obedience to physical laws governing our bodies. If our will and way are in accordance with God's will and way; if we do the pleasure of our Creator, He will keep the human organism in good condition, and restore the moral, mental, and physical powers, in order that He may work through us to His glory....If we co-operate with Him in this work health and happiness, peace and usefulness, are the sure result.

"He did not die for us in order that we might become slaves to evil habits, but that we might become the sons and daughters of God, serving Him with every power of the being.

"My dear young friends, advance step by step, until all your habits shall be in harmony with the laws of life and health." --Sons and Daughters of God, by Ellen White.

Comment: It seems that we have it in our power to prevent Alzheimer's and the various other deadly diseases that are wreaking havoc in our land. By the grace and help of the Lord we can and must do our part.

Suzanne

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Jeannieb43

Thanks for these reminders!

Now when I'm walking I can chant to myself: "Down with Alzheimer's!"

[or even "half-heimers" as JimBob says...]

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Suzanne Sutton

Alzheimer's: Another Reason to Avoid Soft Drinks

To study the possible effects of consuming high-sugar soft drinks, researchers with the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology fed a 10% sugar-water solution to mice. After 25 weeks, the sugar-fed mice, bred to develop Alzheimer's-like symptons, had gained about 17% more weight than the control mice, had higher cholesterol levels, and developed insulin resistance--a symptom of diabetes.

When tested for memory skill and brain composition, the sugar-fed animals did worse on learning and memory retention. Their brains showed over twice as many amyloid plaque deposits as the controls. This is a marker for Alzheimer's. --The Saturday Evening Post, July/August 2008.

Suzanne

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Suzanne Sutton

B Vitamins Proven To Slow Progression of Dementia, Alzheimer's

by David Gutierrez, staff writer

(NaturalNews) Mega-doses of B vitamins may significantly slow brain shrinkage and slow the progression of dementia, according to a study conducted by researchers from Oxford University and published in the journal PLoS One.

"This is a very dramatic and striking result," lead researcher David Smith said. "It's much more than we could have predicted."

"It is our hope that this simple and safe treatment will delay development of Alzheimer's in many people who suffer from mild memory problems."

Researchers assigned 168 people suffering from mild cognitive impairment to take either a placebo or a pill containing 15 times the recommended daily dose of vitamin B6, four times the recommended dose of B9 and 300 times the recommended dose of B12. These vitamins are known to lower levels of the amino acid homocysteine, which has been linked to Alzheimer's disease.

Approximately 50 percent of people who suffer from mild cognitive impairment eventually develop a more severe form of dementia.

On average, the brains of patients taking the vitamins shrank at half the rate of those taking a placebo. The benefit was most pronounced in patients whose homocysteine levels were high at the start of the study.

An estimated 35 million people around the world suffer from dementia, including 26.6 million with Alzheimer's disease. In the United States, Alzheimer's rates are estimated at 1.2 percent of the general population, climbing to as high as 42 percent of those older than 84.

"Clearly, in the Western World, dementia is not a rare problem," write doctors Abram Hoffer and Harold D. Foster in Feel Better, Live Longer with Vitamin B-3.

"Indeed, R. Katzman and colleagues have argued that in people more than 75 years of age, new cases of dementia occur as frequently as myocardial infarction and twice as often as stroke."

The authors note that Hoffman has been prescribing vitamin B3 to patients who show preliminary signs of age-related cognitive impairment since 1955.

To learn more about how to fight disease with nutrition, read the free NaturalNews.com report "Nutrition Can Save America!" at

http://www.naturalnews.com/report_N....

Sources for this story include: http://www.reuters.com/article/idUS... http://ca.news.yahoo.com/s/capress/....

Suzanne

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Suzanne Sutton

A sound sleep may be a solid defense against memory loss and Alzheimer's disease

by John Phillip

(NaturalNews) Alzheimer's disease presently ranks as the sixth leading cause of death in the US, as the number of new cases is projected to triple by the year 2050 and affect as many as sixteen million people. The result of a new study presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 64th Annual Meeting has found that the level and duration of quality sleep may later affect memory function and the risk of Alzheimer's disease in later life.

Researchers determined that poor quality sleep is associated with the build-up of neural tangles between synapses that is associated with the loss of ability to form new memories and progression of Alzheimer's dementia. Making time for seven to nine hours of uninterrupted sleep each night may be a crucial factor to Alzheimer's risk reduction as we age.

A Good Night's Sleep Dramatically Lowers Risk of Developing Brain Plaques and Alzheimer's Disease

The lead study author, Dr. Yo-El Ju from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis noted "Disrupted sleep appears to be associated with the build-up of amyloid plaques, a hallmark marker of Alzheimer's disease, in the brains of people without memory problems". In an effort to determine the link between poor sleep habits and cognitive decline, researchers tested the sleep patterns of 100 people between the ages of 45 and 80 who were free of dementia.

Half of the participants tested had a family history of Alzheimer's disease, while a second control group had no familial history of the disease. A special device used to measure sleep patterns was placed on all participants for a period of two weeks to assess quality and depth of sleep time. Additionally, sleep diaries and questionnaires were employed to further analyze sleep cycles.

The study found that 25% of the subjects tested showed signs of amyloid plaques, a consistent marker of Alzheimer's disease progression. Although the participant's averaged 8 hours of sleep each night, this was reduced to 6.5 hours due to sleep disruptions during the night that affected the total sleep time and quality of deep sleep required by the brain to perform repair functions.

Those who did not wake up frequently during the night were 5 times less likely to possess the amyloid plaque build-up compared to those who slept poorly or less than 7 total hours. Participants who did not sleep well were significantly more likely to exhibit the amyloid markers associated with cognitive decline resulting in Alzheimer's disease.

Although this study did not provide a direct reason for the finding, scientists believe that the amyloid protein clumps and tangles that occur as a normal process of metabolism in the brain are only cleared during quality sleep time and duration of 7 to 9 hours each night. In addition to the myriad of lifestyle and dietary patterns presently known to help prevent most chronic diseases such as Alzheimer's, a good night's sleep in a totally dark room with no interruptions should now be added to the top of the risk reduction list.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.aan.com

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/241729.php

http://www.cbsnews.com

Suzanne

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Suzanne Sutton

Resveratrol may be the missing link to prevent and even treat Alzheimer's disease

by John Phillip

(NaturalNews) Incidence of Alzheimer's disease cases continue to explode at an unprecedented rate as processed food diets, overweight and obesity become the norm for middle and senior aged adults in the US and most western societies. By the year 2050, it's projected that 13.2 million adults will suffer from this degenerative disease that ranks as the sixth leading cause of death, with many suffering early signs of the condition at earlier ages. Any natural compound that can be shown to prevent or even treat Alzheimer's disease would be a potent therapeutic tool.

Researchers from Georgetown University Medical Center's Memory Disorders Program have embarked on a mission to demonstrate that resveratrol can affect memory deterioration and daily functioning in people with mild to moderate dementia due to Alzheimer's disease. Resveratrol is a natural compound found in red grapes, red grape juice, red wine, chocolate, tomatoes and peanuts. In prior studies, the polyphenol has been shown to help prevent diabetes, act as a natural cancer fighter, ward off cardiovascular disease, and prevent memory loss.

Resveratrol study to confirm the benefits of resveratrol to thwart Alzheimer's disease

As the risk of many chronic conditions increase with aging, resveratrol exhibits unique characteristics as it has been shown to impede telomere shortening and extend natural cell life and activity. Resveratrol has also been shown to improve glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity, two mechanisms known to speed the aging process.

Researchers will examine the direct impact of pure resveratrol supplementation on neural aging and amyloid protein clearance. Recent research has suggested that Alzheimer's disease may result from insulin resistance specifically in the brain, and as resveratrol is known to cross the blood-brain barrier, the compound may prevent faulty insulin signaling that promotes the degenerative condition.

This is the largest and most extensive study of its kind developed to validate the brain health benefits of resveratrol. Researchers will recruit participants from 26 U.S. academic institutions that are affiliated with the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study around the country. This study is unique because it is designed to demonstrate the impact of a natural compound and not a patentable pharmaceutical drug.

Resveratrol is supplied in small amounts from dietary sources including red grapes, red wine, chocolate and tomatoes. Nutrition experts recommend supplementing with a pure extract (20 to 500 mg per day) for optimal protection against Alzheimer's disease and a myriad of chronic conditions.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/245346.php

http://www.examiner.com

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-05/gumc-gpl050812.php

Suzanne

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Suzanne Sutton

A workout a day keeps dementia away

by Ben Meredith

(NaturalNews) It's common knowledge that exercise is good for the body. Regular exercise aids in reducing the risk of heart attack and stroke, among other important benefits. New research now shows, though, that exercise can prove to be a very vital factor in the lessening or prevention of cognitive impairment.

Doctors at the University of Lisbon in Portugal organized a study of over 600 participants between the ages of 65 to 84. Each of the participants' brains showed early warning signs of dementia, but none of them had debilitation in their daily lives, and they all lived independently. The researchers followed the subjects over a period of three years. During that time, the participants had their brain scanned on a regular basis. They were assessed on their cognitive ability, and they reported how often and how much they exercised.

The results showed that the participants who reported doing 30 minutes of exercise at least three times per week had about a 40 percent lower risk of developing dementia in comparison to those who reported less activity. During the three years of the study, 90 subjects developed dementia.

"Dementia" is a term that describes multiple types of mental disability. The most common mental disability is Alzheimer's. In this study, the exercise-to-cognitive-function association was strongest for vascular dementia, which is a type of non-Alzheimer's dementia that is caused by inadequate blood flow to the brain. While exercise showed a reduction in the risk for vascular dementia by almost 60 percent, physical activity didn't seem to specifically affect the risk of developing Alzheimer's.

The doctors performing the study also took MRI scans of their subjects to look for changes in the white matter of the participants' brains, which is linked to dementia. All of the participants showed changes of white matter at the beginning of the study in varying degrees. Researchers made sure to take into account other factors that can affect memory and cognitive function, like age, history of stroke, and diabetes. However, they found that even in taking in these other factors, the protective effects of exercise still held.

There were 34 cases in the study whose findings didn't hold. These participants showed signs of Alzheimer's, and in their cases, exercise was not correlated to their rates of mental decline.

It was noted by the professionals that, before starting an exercise program, patients should discuss their plans and get clearance from their doctors. A new exercise program should begin in a gradual manner, especially for those with heart problems. But even if physical activity doesn't delay mental decline, it's still a win-win, as it has many other important health benefits that shouldn't be overlooked.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.medpagetoday.com/Cardiology/Dementia/35685

http://www.cbc.ca

http://www.counselheal.com

Suzanne

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Suzanne Sutton

Moderate and regular physical activity shown better than any drug to lower Alzheimer's disease risk

by John Phillip

(NaturalNews) Alzheimer's disease recently escalated to become the sixth leading cause of death in the US, as five million people presently live with the disease, causing an estimated 210 billion dollars in health care costs each year. Amazingly, one in three people will die with some form of Alzheimer's disease or other form of dementia. Extensive research studies have clearly demonstrated that Alzheimer's disease risk is increased by lifestyle influences that alter genetic expression toward disease. Diet, exposure to toxic household and environmental pollutants and lack of physical activity are all known to flip the metabolic gene switch that can either protect against or promote the disease.

Despite the thousands of well constructed, scientific studies showing that poor diet and lifestyle practices promote Alzheimer's dementia, pharmaceutical giants continue to plow billions into a futile search for a magic bullet that will treat or prevent this devastating illness. Continued evidence has been released by a group of researchers from the University of Maryland School of Public Health that shows how exercising for 150 minutes each week may be the best treatment for Alzheimer's disease. Publishing in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, scientists reveal that exercise could improve cognitive function in people at risk of Alzheimer's by improving the efficiency of brain activity.

Regular exercise prevents cognitive decline and boosts neural activity to thwart Alzheimer's progression

To set up their study, the team analyzed seventeen participants with mild cognitive impairment, an early form of memory loss that is believed to be a precursor to full-blown Alzheimer's disease, and compared them with eighteen control members. Both groups were of similar age, gender, education, genetic risk and used similar medications. All participants were asked to carry out a twelve week exercise program consisting of walking on a treadmill at moderate intensity while being supervised by a personal trainer.

Before and after the exercise program, both groups were asked to complete memory tests designed to determine famous name recognition and list learning tasks. While both groups experienced a ten percent improvement in overall fitness levels, researchers found a significant increase in the intensity of brain activation in eleven brain regions as the participants correctly identified famous names. Of considerable importance, the areas of the brain activated with improved efficiency were the same areas of the brain that lead to a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

Team leader, Dr. J. Carson Smith concluded, "We found that after 12 weeks of being on a moderate exercise program, study participants improved their neural efficiency... basically they were using fewer neural resources to perform the same memory task. No study has shown that a drug can do what we showed is possible with exercise." The study results were achieved with moderate physical activity, thirty minutes a day over five days of the week. Interestingly, the same type of exercise has also been shown to ward off heart disease... isn't it time to get moving?

Sources for this article include:

http://iospress.metapress.com

http://www.eurekalert.org

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com

http://science.naturalnews.com

http://science.naturalnews.com

Suzanne

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Suzanne Sutton

Want to save your brain from dementia? Hit the treadmill and pump some weights

by David Gutierrez, staff writer

(NaturalNews) The longest-ever study examining the effect of lifestyle choices on chronic disease has concluded that moderate exercise may be the single most effective way to prevent dementia.

"What the research shows is that following a healthy lifestyle confers surprisingly large benefits to health," lead researcher Peter Elwood said. "Healthy behaviors have a far more beneficial effect than any medical treatment or preventative procedure."

The study, conducted by researcher from the Cardiff University and published in the journal PLOS ONE, followed 2,235 men from south Wales for 35 years, starting in 1979. The men, aged 45 to 49 at the study's start, answered regular questions about their lifestyle and health throughout the study.

The researchers found that five factors were most important in reducing rates of all chronic diseases, including dementia: regular exercise, healthy diet, low body weight, low alcohol intake and not smoking. Compared with people who followed none of these five factors, people who followed any four were 60 percent less likely to suffer from dementia or cognitive decline and 70 percent less likely to suffer from diabetes, heart disease or stroke.

"The size of reduction in the instance of disease owing to these simple healthy steps has really amazed us and is of enormous importance in an ageing population," Elwood said.

Improve your health today

The single biggest connection found was that between exercise and dementia, yet Elwood emphasized that an overall healthy lifestyle is more important than any one component.

"Exercise happens to be the most important but the other factors come in very close behind," he said.

Yet, increasing your physical activity level might be one of the easiest ways to improve your overall health. It takes only 30 minutes of exercise five days a week to reap significant benefits.

"We should all live a more active lifestyle," Elwood said. "If I park my car a mile from work - that makes me likely to do more than the half an hour a day. Any exercise has some benefit and the more, the better."

"Sadly, the evidence from this study shows that very few people follow a fully healthy lifestyle," Elwood said.

The researchers found that, even with reductions in overall smoking rates over the past 35 years, the number of people who qualified as living a healthy lifestyle did not change during the course of the study. This is consistent with recent surveys finding that less than 1 percent of the population of Wales follows all five recommended factors, with 5 percent not following any.

"If the men [in the study] had been urged to adopt just one additional healthy behavior at the start of the study 35 years ago, and if only half of them complied, then during the ensuing 35 years there would have been a 13 percent reduction in dementia, a 12 percent drop in diabetes, 6 percent less vascular disease and a 5 percent reduction in deaths," Elwood said.

The researchers also found that, over the course of the study, unhealthy living was responsible for 10 percent of all healthcare expenditure in Wales.

Dementia is a growing public health concern, expected to affect 135 million people worldwide by 2050.

"We are facing potentially large increases in the numbers of people living with dementia and if we are to deal with this crisis head on we must invest in research," said Rebecca Wood, chief executive of Alzheimer's Research UK.

"It's encouraging for people to know there are simple steps they can take now to reduce their risk," she said.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.bbc.co.uk

http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk

http://www.express.co.uk

http://science.naturalnews.com

Suzanne

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Suzanne Sutton

Exposure to DDT linked to increased risk of Alzheimer's disease in elderly adults

by L.J. Devon, Staff Writer

(NaturalNews) Even after being banned more than 40 years ago, the pesticide DDT continues to affect the lives of people today, beckoning infertility and other deeply concerning health conditions. Researchers are now finding out how the pesticide affects the nervous system. In 1972, when the US banned DDT from commercial production, environmental tests confirmed that this pesticide was harmful to the environment, especially bird habitats.

Now, decades later, this toxic pesticide is being linked to increased risk of Alzheimer's in elderly adults. Researchers at Rutgers University report that DDT increases risk and severity of Alzheimer's disease in patients primarily over the age of 60. The findings, published in the journal JAMA Neurology, showed how DDE, the breakdown compound of DDT, is measured four times higher in the blood of late onset Alzheimer's patients. The study took into consideration only chlorinated compounds and did not assess newer pesticides widely accepted in agriculture today.

DDT lurking in most blood samples today

Introduced as a pesticide during WWII, DDT was applied en masse as agricultural insect control and was even used to fight off insect-borne diseases like malaria. (Africa still uses this pesticide in homes to control insects.) The pesticide is so pervasive that it regularly appears in 75 to 80 percent of the blood samples collected today, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

This may be due to imported fruit that comes from countries that still apply DDT. This may also be because DDT takes many decades to break down in the environment. Traces of WWII-era DDT could be breaking down in people's blood today in the 21st century.

DDT levels measured four times greater in Alzheimer's patients

For the Rutger's study, the Emory University Alzheimer's Disease Research Center and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School's Alzheimer's Disease Center collaborated, focusing on 86 Alzheimer's patients and 79 control group participants who showed no symptoms of Alzheimer's. When the researchers measured the blood of all participants, they found that 74 out of 86 Alzheimer's patients had DDE blood levels four times greater than control participants!

Their study connected genetics and environmental factors. Alzheimer's patients showing expression of the gene ApoE typically possess greater risk for Alzheimer's; in concordance, the highest measured levels of DDE were correlated with the most severe cognitive impairments in those with ApoE gene expression.

"We need to conduct further research to determine whether this occurs and how the chemical compound interacts with the ApoE4 gene," says Jason R. Richardson, associate professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine at Robert Wood Johnson Medical School.

DDT pesticide increases nerve cell plaque associated with Alzheimer's

Alzheimer's is characterized by plaque formation between nerve cells, which leads to massive nerve cell die-offs. Increased amyloid protein permits the plaque to form.

In further brain cell studies, the researchers made an association between pesticide DDT and increased amyloid protein accumulation. DDT basically fueled nerve cell plaques in areas of the brain responsible for learning, memory and thinking.

"Much of the research into Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases has mostly been centered on finding genetic connections," Richardson says. "I think these results demonstrate that more attention should be focused on potential environmental contributors and their interaction with genetic susceptibility."

"This study demonstrates that there are additional contributors to Alzheimer's disease that must be examined and that may help identify those at risk of developing Alzheimer's. It is important because when it comes to diagnosing and treating this and other neurodegenerative diseases, the earlier someone is diagnosed, the more options there may be available."

Sources for this article include:

http://news.rutgers.edu

http://www.environmentalhealthnews.org

http://science.naturalnews.com

Suzanne

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Suzanne Sutton

Natural Flavonol Compound in Fruits and Vegetables Prevents Alzheimer's Disease

by L.J. Devon, Staff Writer

(NaturalNews) Riddled with deposits of a peptide called beta-amyloid, the brain can become consumed with plaque, which builds up in the spaces between nerve cells. When nerve cells begin to die off, symptoms of Alzheimer's disease set in.

Natural flavanol works beyond plaque to restore memory

In areas of the brain where memory is important, tangles of plaque can develop from twisted fibers of tau protein. Alzheimer's, the most common form of dementia, has always been recognized by this plaque buildup, which is associated with problems in thinking, memory and behavior. As a condition that slowly worsens over time, Alzheimer's is ultimately capable of interfering with daily tasks and newly learned information.

New findings suggest that Alzheimer's can be reversed. A new fruit- and vegetable-based treatment could effectively bypass plaque formation and work independently to restore memory in the nerve cells of the brain, turning on specific memory-related pathways.

Nerve cells work together in vast networks

With over 100 billion nerve cells at work in the brain, communicating in vast networks, cellular protection is vital. Nerve cells specialize in some of the most complicated areas of the human experience, including jobs like smell, taste, hearing, learning, thinking,and memory. Operating like miniature factories, nerve cells perform an array of functions, including obtaining necessary supplies, communication, energy generation, information storage and waste removal. Scientists have a hard time pinpointing how Alzheimer's takes hold in a person as they age.

Fisetin improves memory of Alzheimer's-ridden mice

How might specific properties of fruits and vegetables help stop memory loss as seen in Alzheimer's disease?

One flavanol, fisetin, was isolated, studied and put to the test in Alzheimer's-ridden mice. Scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have discovered that a daily dose of this fruit and vegetable compound can help mice recover their memory.

The fisetin surprised the scientists, showing promise for improving memory even as amyloid plaque formation stayed the same. These accumulations of proteins remained prevalent in Alzheimer's mice and continued gumming up nerve cells even after fisetin was administered, but their memory improved independent of the plaque formations. This new finding suggests that there may be a way to treat Alzheimer's symptoms without combating amyloid plaques.

"Fisetin didn't affect the plaques," says Maher. "It seems to act on other pathways that haven't been seriously investigated in the past as therapeutic targets," says Pamela Maher, a senior staff scientist in Salk's Cellular Neurobiology Laboratory who led the new study.

Over 10 years ago, Maher learned that fisetin helped protect neurons in the brain, after isolating the flavanol in cell cultures and examining its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant prowess in nerve cells. In her research, fisetin was found to turn on a specific cellular pathway that improves memory.

Fisetin working on the molecular level

Working with Dave Schubert, leader of the Cellular Neurobiology Lab, Maher conducted her tests on a group of mice with two gene mutations linked to Alzheimer's.

After feeding the fisetin to the mice at three months old, the researchers began studying how the natural substance affected mice in a variety of learning skills and water mazes.

At just nine months of age, mice receiving no fisetin performed more poorly in the water mazes. These Alzheimer's-destined mice would normally show memory deficits by the first year, but after eating fisetin, they performed just as well as normal mice, at both nine months old and one year of age.

"Even as the disease would have been progressing, the fisetin was able to continue preventing symptoms," Maher says.

To investigate further, Maher collaborated with scientists at the University of California, San Diego, to key in on specific brain molecules. What they found was that fisetin turned on pathways involved in cellular inflammation. Anti-inflammatory molecules were observed in specific areas of the brain involved in memory after pathways were triggered on.

When fisetin was administered, p35 protein was blocked from being cut down into a shorter form. Short versions of the p35 protein are responsible for turning many molecular pathways on and off.

"It may be that compounds like this that have more than one target are most effective at treating Alzheimer's disease," says Maher, "because it's a complex disease where there are a lot of things going wrong."

Sources for this article include:

http://www.salk.edu

http://science.naturalnews.com

Suzanne

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Suzanne Sutton

New Risk Factor For Alzheimer's Disease Revealed: Are You Getting a Good Night's Sleep?

by John Phillip

(NaturalNews) Extensive research over the past twenty years has repeatedly shown that Alzheimer's dementia is largely the result of a variety of lifestyle factors that promote the development of amyloid plaques and tau proteins in the brain that usher the onset of this dreaded disease. A diet high in processed carbohydrate and sugars, exposure to environmental and household pollutants and lack of physical activity have all been linked with development and progression of the disease. Now scientists have found that poor sleep patterns, as experienced by millions of aging adults, may be a powerful trigger for Alzheimer's disease.

Researchers from Temple University in Philadelphia, PA, reporting the results of their work in the journal, Neurobiology of Aging, have determined that people who experience chronic sleep disturbance, either through their work, insomnia or other reasons, could face an earlier onset of dementia and Alzheimer's. Prior research bodies have concluded that chronic sleep problems can inflame a number of health problems, ranging from cardiovascular disease and depression to cancer and diabetes.

Lack of restful sleep promotes brain tangle formation and early signs of Alzheimer's dementia

Lead study author, Dr. Domenico Pratico commented "The big biological question that we tried to address in this study is whether sleep disturbance is a risk factor to develop Alzheimer's or is it something that manifests with the disease." Using a transgenic mouse model known to simulate human neurological pathologies, the team examined the effects of sleep deprivation to determine the development of the two hallmark signs of Alzheimer's disease: amyloid plaques and tau protein tangles.

Starting their study when the mice were 6 months old, the human equivalent of a 40-year-old, the researchers began an 8-week study. As one group of mice was exposed to 12 hours of light and 12 hours of darkness, another group was exposed to 20 hours of light and 4 hours of darkness, which significantly reduced their sleep time. At the end of the test period, the scientists did not detect any outward behavioral signs of Alzheimer's disease. When they conducted memory tests in the mice however, the group with reduced sleep time demonstrated significant impairment in their working and retention memory, as well as the ability to learn new tasks.

Dr. Pratico noted "We did observe that the sleep disturbance group had a significant increase in the amount of tau protein that became phosphorylated and formed the tangles inside the brain's neuronal cells." Tau protein is an important part of neuronal cell health, so these elevated levels cause a disturbance in normal function. This disruption will eventually impair the brain's ability for learning, forming new memory and other cognitive functions, and contributes to Alzheimer's disease.

The authors concluded "that chronic sleep disturbance is an environmental risk factor for Alzheimer's disease... but the good news is that sleep disturbances can be easily treated, which would hopefully reduce the Alzheimer's risk." It has been well documented that we require 7 to 9 hours of restful, uninterrupted sleep in a fully darkened room each and every night to promote efficient metabolic housekeeping and ward off a number of chronic disease conditions including Alzheimer's dementia.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.neurobiologyofaging.org

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/274188.php

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140317155205.htm

Suzanne

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Suzanne Sutton

Exercise Halts 'Dementia Gene' From Being Expressed, Keeps Your Brain Healthy

by Jonathan Benson, staff writer

(NaturalNews) Dementia is the sixth-leading cause of death in the U.S. today, and experts say the next generation could see twice as many people suffering from it, particularly in old age. But avoiding the brain-deteriorating disease could be as simple as remembering to exercise just a few times a week, according to a new study, which appears to inhibit the expression of the "dementia gene."

Over the course of 18 months, researchers from the University of Maryland measured the brain sizes of elderly participants who were divided into four groups. The activity levels of each of the participants were gauged in conjunction with whether or not they possessed a gene known as APOE-e4, which has been associated with an increased risk of dementia.

Up to 30 percent of the population possesses this gene, and the research team wanted to see whether or not physical exertion affects its expression. What they found is that those with APOE-e4 who exercised at least three times a week experienced a lesser overall decrease in brain mass, a common sign of dementia, compared to those who engaged in little or no exercise.

"We found that physical activity has the potential to preserve the volume of the hippocampus in those with increased risk for Alzheimer's disease, which means we can possibly delay cognitive decline and the onset of dementia symptoms in these individuals," stated Dr. J. Carson Smith, one of the study's authors. "Physical activity interventions may be especially potent and important for this group."

Don't forget proper nutrition in the fight against dementia

Published in the journal Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, the study provides new insights into the mind-body connection, and the importance of physical exertion in maintaining a healthy brain. Though exercise alone is hardly the best approach, as nutrition is equally if not more important for preserving brain function, it is vital for maintaining good health, especially in old age.

"We do not yet have the level of exercise needed to justify this approach specifically for Alzheimer's prevention," added Dr. Smith, as quoted by the UK's Daily Mail. "ut exercise certainly cannot harm, so should be prescribed regardless."

To go along with this, avoiding certain foods and chemical exposures and embracing better dietary and lifestyle habits will duly help in the fight against dementia....

Sources for this article include:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk

https://www.alz.org

http://wellnessmama.com

http://www.psychologytoday.com

http://science.naturalnews.com

Suzanne

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Suzanne Sutton

Could The Key To Alzheimer's Disease Prevention Be As Simple As Eating Strawberries?

by John Phillip

(NaturalNews) Two decades of dedicated research has clearly revealed that dementia and specifically the dreaded diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease can be prevented or even halted by making lifestyle modifications toward a natural food diet that excludes processed and refined junk foods as well as following a regular exercise regimen and limiting exposure to personal cosmetics and environmental toxins. While this sounds like a tall order for many, slow but steady progress toward a more natural lifestyle can be beneficial to many individuals who may be headed toward a host of chronic diseases associated with aging including Alzheimer's. An extensive body of research over the past five to ten years has validated certain natural compounds found in fruits and vegetables, specifically the delicious strawberry.

Researchers from the Salk Institute for Biological Studies has found that fisetin, a flavanol found in strawberries, mangoes, cucumber and other fruits and vegetables, may protect the brain against Alzheimer's, dementia and age-related memory loss. Publishing in the journal Aging Cell, scientists were able to show, using experiments on mice that normally develop Alzheimer's symptoms less than a year after birth, that a daily dose of fisetin prevents the progressive memory and learning impairments commonly associated with the disease.

Fisetin from fruits and vegetables calms brain inflammation to prevent Alzheimer's symptoms

Senior staff scientist Dr. Pamela Maher commented, "We had already shown that in normal animals, fisetin can improve memory. What we showed here is that it also can have an effect on animals prone to Alzheimer's."

Interestingly, the researchers determined that fisetin did not alter the formation of amyloid plaques in the brain, accumulations of proteins which are commonly blamed for Alzheimer's disease. The new finding suggests a way to treat Alzheimer's symptoms independent of targeting amyloid plaques.

The study team found that, in the brains of mice genetically modified to develop Alzheimer's, pathways associated with inflammation at the cellular level were activated. But in the brains of fisetin-treated mice, the scientists identified anti-inflammatory molecules that quieted the inflammation. In particular, scientists determined that fisetin affected a protein known as p35 that has been implicated in turning on inflammatory pathways. Dr. Maher noted, "What we realized is that fisetin has a number of properties that we thought might be beneficial when it comes to Alzheimer's. ... Even as the disease would have been progressing, the fisetin was able to continue preventing symptoms."

It is important to note that fisetin was found to help prevent Alzheimer's progression, and no determination was made that the compound can reverse the disease after it has initiated. As with many chronic disease processes, lifestyle modification is a critical component to prevention. Dr. Maher concluded, "It may be that compounds like this that have more than one target are most effective at treating Alzheimer's disease, because it's a complex disease where there are a lot of things going wrong."

Regular consumption of strawberries and cucumbers and other natural fruits and vegetables can provide a sufficient dose of fisetin to help fight inflammation-mediated diseases including Alzheimer's dementia.

Sources for this article include:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com

http://www.sciencedaily.com

http://science.naturalnews.com

Suzanne

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Suzanne Sutton

Smell the Peanut Butter

What it Detects: Alzheimer's Disease.

How it Works: Alzheimer's typically affects our sense of smell because the area of the brain that processes odors, the olfactory cortex, is the first to show signs of dysfunction. (Memory problems come later.) That's why a researcher at the University of Florida, developed the peanut butter test, the results of which are published in the Journal of the Neurological Sciences.

Normal aging can affect our sense of smell, but peanut butter isn't an odor usually lost with time, according to researchers, making it a good tool for evaluating early Alzheimer's. In the study, they measured the distance at which participants could smell peanut butter through the left nostril compared with the right. Those with early Alzheimer's could not detect the smell until it was an average of almost 5 inches to the left nostril compared with the right.

While it is difficult to perform the test by yourself, you will need a partner. Close your eyes ask your partner to held a small jar of peanut butter 12 inches away from your left nostril while you hold your right nostril closed. Slowly move the jar closer until you are able to detect the smell. Now test your right nostril. You should be able to smell the peanut butter equally well in both nostril. If you can't, see your doctor to rule out treatable conditions that affect smell. AARP The Magazine

Suzanne

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phkrause

Alzheimer’s Disease Caregivers: How to Improve Communication

Caring for elderly loved ones can be challenging. And when Alzheimer’s robs them of the ability to talk, you both may feel lost. Read on for tips to communicate better and ease their frustration – and yours...

http://www.lifescript.com/health/centers...munication.aspx

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