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Suzanne Sutton

A Healthy Prostate Gland

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Suzanne Sutton

Protect the Prostate with Pomegranates

by Frank Mangano, citizen journalist

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(NaturalNews) How do you keep the prostate healthy? Well, if you watch a lot of TV commercials, you probably think it's best accomplished by popping a pill. But for men looking to prevent prostate cancer through nutrition, you'd be hard-pressed to find a more prostate-protective food than the yummy pomegranate.

The health benefits of pomegranates are well-established. Past studies indicate pomegranates are positively boiling over with antioxidants, as UCLA researchers found that pomegranate juice has more free-radical fighting antioxidants than any other juice. In another study (also from UCLA), findings indicated that pomegranates were loaded with anti-cancer benefits, as "the seeded apple" (i.e., the nickname for the seed/aril-laden pomegranate) helped to minimize the progression of cancerous tumors in lab rats.

And with the most recent finding that pomegranate juice helps protect the prostate, it's a bit more grist to add to an already full mill.

The in-vitro experiment mixed the pomegranate's elligitannins, the antioxidant that's believed to be effective in fighting various diseases, with an enzyme that's often present under cancerous conditions. The enzyme is most commonly referred to as CYP1B1.

By the study's conclusion, the University of Mississippi researchers found that, indeed, the elligitannins were effective in minimizing the enzyme's activity, writing in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that "systemically available metabolites of pomegranate juice are effective inhibitors of CYP1B1 activity/expression and could lower the incidence of prostate cancer initiation and sustenance."

The researchers went on to write that pomegranate juice has chemoprevention-like properties, making it an ideal juice both for prostate cancer prevention and prostate cancer treatment.

This finding couldn't have come at a better time for cancer patients, as a recent study published in the British Journal of Cancer found that as many as two-thirds of patients in the UK that received chemotherapy for prostate cancer receive it unnecessarily.

Prostate cancer, a cancer found exclusively among men, kills an estimated 200,000 men worldwide (about 28,000 in the U.S. alone) annually. Another 500,000 men worldwide are diagnosed with prostate cancer every year.

Prostate cancer is second only to skin cancer in cancer diagnoses among men and second to lung cancer in cancer deaths among men.

There are many risk factors to take into consideration when evaluating risk for prostate cancer (e.g., age, ethnicity, family history), and the American Cancer Society reports that diet is certainly one of them. Several studies suggest that diets high in red meat, but low in fresh produce is one such risk factor.

Sources:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/release...

http://www.nutraingredients.com/Res...

http://www.webmd.com/prostate-cance...

http://www.cancer.org/docroot/CRI/c...

About the author

Frank Mangano is an American author, health advocate, researcher and entrepreneur in the field of alternative health. He is perhaps best known for his book "The Blood Pressure Miracle," which continues to be an Amazon best selling book. Additionally, he has published numerous reports and a considerable amount of articles pertaining to natural health.

Mangano is the publisher of Natural Health On The Web, which offers readers free and valuable information on alternative remedies. To learn more visit:

http://www.naturalhealthontheweb.com

Suzanne

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Suzanne Sutton

More on Prostate Problems

Men can significantly reduce their risk for urinary and prostate problems by avoiding coffee and caffeine. Milton Krisiloff, MD, a urologist from Santa Monica, California, found that dietary modification, including the elimination of all sources of caffeine, actually resolved prostatitis (prostate infection and inflammation) in the great majority of his patients. --Let's Live, October 1997;100.

Comment: It never ceases to amaze me that science is finding that the health message presented by Ellen White is right on target. We can thank the Lord that we as SDAs have had a head start in becoming knowledgeable in ways to maintain, regain and promote healthful living!

Suzanne

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Suzanne Sutton

Prostate Cancer Continues Its Deadly March!

That's right, it seems that every week we hear about someone else that has succumbed to this killer. We cannot forget that many of our men folk are battling and dying from this cruel killer. How tragic, no one should die of such a painful and devastating disease such as prostate cancer.

Let our men folk be reminded that prostate cancer as well as virtually every other cancer can be prevented and many times be alleviated after it has occurred. As has already been posted earlier there is much that can be done. Here are some reminders:

* "For prostate cancer, epidemiologic studies consistently show a positive association with high consumption of milk, dairy products and meats." --Giovannucci E., Adv. Exp Med. Biol., 1999; 472:29-42.

* "Higher intake of meat and dairy products has been associated with greater risk of prostate cancer..." --Walter Willett, of Harvard Medical School.

* "Positive correlations between foods and cancer mortality rates were particularly strong in the case of meats and milk for breast cancer, milk for prostate and ovarian cancer, and meats for colon cancer." --D.P Rose, Cancer Dec. 1, 1986.

* "Diet appears to be a major determinant in the incidence of prostate cancer. In a case-control study conducted in Athens, Greece, we found that dairy products, butter and seed oils were positively associated with risk of prostate cancer, whereas cooked and raw tomatoes were inversely associated." --Bosetti C., European Journal of Cancer Prevention, April 9, 2000, 119-23.

* Suggestive positive associations were also seen between fatal prostate cancer and consumption of milk, cheese, eggs, and meat." --Snowdon, D.A, Am. J Epidemiol Aug. 1984.

* "The strongest and most consistent effects are positive associations with animal products such as red meats, eggs and dairy foods, and possibly by implication, fat." --Giles G, Ireland P., Int J Cancer 1997; Suppl 10:13-7.

* "High consumption of dairy products was associated with a 50% increased risk of prostate cancer." --Chan JM, Cancer Causes Control, Dec. 9, 1998.

* "Positive trends in risk were found for consumption of cured meat and milk products." --Schuurman, A.G., Br J. Cancer, June 1999.

And on and on it goes...Brothers and sisters (stand by your man...) let us take heed to the mountain of information that is available on this most important subject.

Suzanne

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Suzanne Sutton

Prostate Cancer Risk Linked To a Diet High In Red and Processed Meats

by John Phillip

(NaturalNews) Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer and second most common cause of cancer related death in men in the United States. Nearly one in five men will develop the disease during their lifetime. New research demonstrates that increased consumption of ground beef or processed meat is positively associated with aggressive prostate cancer, according to a study published in the journal PLoS ONE. Researchers found a strong correlation between well cooked, grilled or barbequed red meat and processed meats and the development of prostate cancer. Health-minded individuals will want to severely limit and review cooking methods for red and processed meat consumption to limit this prostate cancer risk factor.

The result of a study conducted at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), offers solid evidence of a link between aggressive prostate cancer and meat consumption. Scientists found prostate cancer growth is driven largely by consumption of grilled or barbecued red meat, especially when it is well-done. Senior study author, Dr. John Witte set out to explain the result of prior studies and to establish a scientific basis for increased prostate cancer risk with red and processed meat consumption.

Well Cooked Red and Processed Meats Dramatically Increase Prostate Cancer Incidence

Researchers used a cohort of 470 men with aggressive prostate cancer and contrasted them against 512 matched controls that did not have prostate cancer. All the men completed questionnaires that enabled the researchers to assess not only their meat intake for the previous 12 months, but also the type of meat and how it had been prepared. Researchers placed special emphasis on the "doneness level", ranging from rare to well-done.

The study authors used pre-established levels of carcinogens from the National Cancer Institute's CHARRED database, which contains the mutagen content for each type of meat by cooking method and doneness. Compiling the data obtained from the participants allowed the researchers to determine the consumption levels of chemicals that have the potential to transform into cancer-causing compounds including heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The study established the following conclusions:

"Higher consumption of any ground beef or processed meats was positively linked with aggressive prostate cancer, with ground beef showing the strongest association."

"The main driver of this link was intake of grilled or barbecued meat, with more well-done meat tied to a higher risk of aggressive prostate cancer."

"Men who ate high levels of well or very well cooked ground beef had twice the odds of developing aggressive prostate cancer compared to men who ate none."

Dr. Witte and his team were able to make a conclusive link between well cooked and processed meats and incidence of prostate cancer. Of particular importance was the degree of cooking and use of high heat cooking methods that add carcinogens to the surface of the meat. Most health-conscious people avoid regular meat consumption. This study provides further evidence that limiting or eliminating meat from the diet and utilizing proper cooking practices for all types of food can help prevent prostate cancer and many chronic illnesses.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.plosone.org/article/info...

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/rel...

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/art...

Suzanne

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Suzanne Sutton

Taking a Daily Brisk Walk Lowers the Risk of Prostate Cancer

by Yanjun

(NaturalNews) Prostate cancer is one of the leading killers among men over 60 years of age. This type of cancer can go for many years undetected, and without causing any serious problems. However, it can also get very aggressive and spread rapidly to other parts of the body. When this happens, it can be very difficult to treat. But there is some good news. It has been proved that taking a daily brisk walk lowers the risk of prostate cancer.

Risks of developing cancer increase with one's age

Age has been known to be one of the major contributing factors to the occurrence of prostate cancer among men. Scientifically, men who are over 60 years are more prone to this deadly disease than those below that age. The disease can be detected very easily when one is approaching 70 years of age. Additionally, other factors that research has shown to contribute to the developing of this type of cancer have been highlighted below.

Men who are obese are more prone to prorate cancerFamily history has also been known to play a key role. Genetics and gene mutations in the family have been identified to cause prorate cancer.Consumption of high fat dairy products and red meat. If one is to fight successfully, he needs to take more fruits and vegetables.Chronic prostatitis, STI, alcohol, and smoking have also been mentioned by many researches to be among the factors that make men more susceptible to prostate cancer.

A daily brisk walk

Research has shown that daily work, coupled with regulars exercise, can have an extensive impact on prostate cancer prognosis. Ideally, a man who engages is some kind of high level physical activity has one of lowest risks of developing prostate cancer when compared to those men who do not actually exercise. In other findings, men with prostate tumors that have more regular blood vessels have a better prognosis than men with prostate tumors that contain irregular blood vessels. Walking has also been mentioned to largely contribute to how regular the man vessels are. Research has shown that men who reported to have walked at a brisk pace had regular shaped blood vessels when compared to men who walked at a less brisk pace.

Conclusion

All in all, there is no effective way that one can use to prevent himself from this type of cancer. However, regular physical activity can be one of the best routes to take. Even men who have been treated with this cancer before are less likely to have a more aggressive prostate cancer if they exercise more frequently. If the scientific findings are anything to go by, then men need to start walking briskly, eat more vegetables, and exercising regularly to keep prostate cancer at bay.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.daijiworld.com/news/news_disp.asp?n_id=213829

http://www.pcf.org

http://www.nhs.uk

Suzanne

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Suzanne Sutton

Frying Red Meat Boosts Risk Of Prostate Cancer By A Whopping 40 Percent

by John Phillip

(NaturalNews) Prior research studies have implicated overcooking meats, especially red meat, due to the formation of carbon-based amines that greatly increase the risk of digestive cancers over many years of consumption. These studies have suggested eating meats that have been stewed or roasted in favor of char grilled or well done to avoid the charred 'bark' that forms as a result of barbequing or grilling over open flames.

A research team publishing in the journal Carcinogenesis from the University of Southern California and Cancer Prevention Institute of California found that cooking red meats at high temperatures, especially pan-fried red meats, may increase the risk of advanced prostate cancer by as much as 40 percent. This new study provides startling new evidence on how red meat is cooked not only increases digestive cancer incidence, but may also increase the risk for prostate cancer.

Consuming grilled, well done and barbecued meat produces cancer causing heterocyclic amines

Researchers gathered data from nearly 2,000 individuals participating in the California Collaborative Prostate Cancer Study. Each participant completed a comprehensive questionnaire that evaluated the amount and type of meat intake, including poultry and processed red meat. Additional information gathered included the cooking method: pan-frying, oven-broiling or grilling. Over the course of the study, more than 1,000 of the men included in the study were diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer.

The lead study author, Dr. Mariana Stern noted "We found that men who ate more than 1.5 servings of pan-fried red meat per week increased their risk of advanced prostate cancer by 30 percent... in addition, men who ate more than 2.5 servings of red meat cooked at high temperatures were 40 percent more likely to have advanced prostate cancer." The scientists found that among red meats, the consumption of hamburger meat, but not steak, was linked to an increased risk of prostate cancer. They speculate that the findings are a result of different levels of carcinogen accumulation found in hamburgers, as they attain higher internal and external temperatures faster than steak.

Cooking method is a significant factor in determining the risk of developing many different forms of cancer, due to the formation of the DNA-damaging carcinogens called heterocyclic amines (HCAs). During the cooking of red meat and poultry, HCAs are formed when sugars and amino acids are cooked at higher temperatures for longer periods of time. It is important to note that this does not vilify the consumption of free-range, grass-fed red meat in moderate portions. Avoid well done, barbequed or grilled cuts of any meat (red meat, chicken, pork or fish) to significantly lower risk of prostate and digestive cancers.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22822096

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120816170404.htm

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/249145.php

http://www.huffingtonpost.com

Suzanne

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Suzanne Sutton

Aggressive Prostate Cancer Caused By Vitamin D Deficiency, Scientists Now Declare

by Ethan A. Huff, staff writer

(NaturalNews) Men with suboptimal or deficient levels of vitamin D are much more likely than other men to develop prostate cancer, according to a new study funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Department of Defense (DoD). Researchers from Northwestern University near Chicago found that vitamin D deficiency can increase the risk of aggressive prostate cancer in some men by nearly 500 percent, highlighting the need for increased focus on natural sunlight exposure and supplementation.

The research was based on an assessment of more than 600 men from around the Chicago area who came from varying ethnic backgrounds. Each of the men had elevated PSA levels or some other risk factor associated with prostate cancer going into the study, and each was evaluated for vitamin D deficiency prior to undergoing a prostate biopsy.

After adjusting for external factors that may have influenced the results, including things like diet, obesity, smoking status and family history, the researchers determined that vitamin D levels are inversely associated with prostate cancer risk. This means that, for each unit of decrease on the vitamin D scale, there is a corresponding increase on the prostate cancer risk scale, and this increase is even more pronounced among certain ethnic groups.

"European-American men and African-American men had 3.66 times and 4.89 times increased odds of having aggressive prostate cancer respectively and 2.42 times and 4.22 times increased odds of having tumor stage T2b or higher, respectively," reads an announcement by Northwestern University. "African-American men with severe vitamin D deficiency also had 2.43 times increased odds of being diagnosed with prostate cancer."

Published in Clinical Cancer Research, the new study draws attention to the crucial role that vitamin D plays in reproductive health. Corresponding with research involving women where vitamin D deficiency has been linked to infertility, the latest prostate cancer discovery demonstrates a need for the public to pay closer attention to vitamin D intake.

"Vitamin D deficiency could be a biomarker of advanced prostate tumor progression in large segments of the general population," stated Adam B. Murphy, M.D., lead author of the study. "Vitamin D deficiency is more common and severe in people with darker skin and it could be that this deficiency is a contributor to prostate cancer progression among African-Americans."

Go out in the sun more or supplement with vitamin D3 to avoid disease

Murphy and his team recommend that more men be screened for vitamin D deficiency, since minor deficiencies can be asymptomatic. But a good rule of thumb for everyday health maintenance is to spend at least 15 minutes out in the sun every day without sunscreen during the summer, or to supplement with at least 5,000 international units (IU) of vitamin D3 daily during the rest of the year, along with magnesium.

The Vitamin D Council has a wealth of information on its website that can help guide you in protecting against vitamin D deficiency. The following page contains specific information about how vitamin D works, how best to obtain it throughout the year and how to protect your skin from sun damage while still obtaining the necessary ultraviolet B (UVB) rays for vitamin D production:

VitaminDCouncil.org.

"Most foods that contain vitamin D only have small amounts, so it's almost impossible to get what your body needs just from food," explains the Vitamin D Council. "Because there are only small amounts of vitamin D in food there are only two sure ways to get enough vitamin D:" "Exposing your bare skin to sunlight to get ultraviolet B (UVB)" and "[t]aking vitamin D supplements."

Sources for this article include:

http://www.northwestern.edu

https://www.vitamindcouncil.org

http://www.vitamindcouncil.org

http://www.vitamindcouncil.org

http://science.naturalnews.com

Suzanne

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Suzanne Sutton

Tomatoes Lower Prostate Cancer Risk By One-fifth

by Julie Wilson

(NaturalNews) In 2014 alone, an estimated 233,000 men will receive a prostate cancer diagnosis, and nearly 30,000 of them will die from the disease. Prostate cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer among men worldwide, after lung or bronchial cancer, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among American men, according to Cancer.org.

Prostate cancer occurs due to a growth in the prostate gland, which is involved in sperm production and transport. When a growth occurs, cells begin to replicate more rapidly. Errors or flaws in the DNA can occur during replication, creating mutated genes.

Inherited DNA only accounts for about 5 to 10 percent of prostate cancer, according to The American Cancer Society, while the remainder of cases most likely occurs due to environmental factors, particularly an increase in certain hormones. Specific endocrine-disrupting compounds increase hormone levels, potentially influencing the development or progression of prostate cancer.

Prostrate cancer is directly linked to endocrine disruptors, such as BPA

Lead, mercury, arsenic, DDT, fire retardants, dioxin and phthalates like bisphenol A (BPA) are just a few examples of endocrine disruptors, also known as "hormone mimickers."

While prostate cancer is treatable, it can often spread aggressively, thus becoming potentially fatal. Interestingly, prostate cancer rates among men are higher in developed countries, leading some experts to suggest that Western culture could be a factor, particularly diet and lifestyle.

To test this theory, researchers at the Universities of Bristol, Cambridge and Oxford examined the diets and lifestyles of more than 1,800 men ages 50-69 with prostate cancer and compared them to over 12,000 cancer-free men.

Published in the medical journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, the study is the first to catalog a prostate cancer "dietary index." The index linked the dietary components selenium, calcium and lycopene-rich foods, to reduced prostate cancer incidence, according to the University of Bristol.

Foods rich in lycopene reduce the risk of prostrate cancer

Men that consumed an "optimal" amount of the above three dietary components had a lower risk of prostate cancer. Lycopene is the red pigment that gives many fruits and vegetables their red color. It's an antioxidant responsible for fighting toxins known to cause DNA and cellular damage.

Foods rich in lycopene include tomatoes, watermelon, grapefruit, asparagus, chicken, red cabbage, carrots and parsley.

According to the study, tomatoes and tomato juice, as well as baked beans, produced the greatest health benefits, providing an 18 percent risk reduction in men eating more than 10 portions per week.

"Our findings suggest that tomatoes may be important in prostate cancer prevention. However, further studies need to be conducted to confirm our findings, especially through human trials," said Vanessa Er, a researcher with the School of Social and Community Medicine at the University of Bristol and Bristol Nutrition BRU.

"Men should still eat a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, maintain a healthy weight and stay active," she added.

Recommendations on physical activity and body weight by cancer prevention institutions were also examined during the study; however, only tips about which foods to eat played a factor in reducing the risk for prostate cancer.

Researches concluded that the recommendations provided by the World Cancer Research Fund and the American Institute for Cancer Research were insufficient, suggesting that additional dietary recommendations should be developed.

The research was funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) and was carried out as part of the ProtecT study, which is funded by the NIHR Health Technology Assessment program, which aims to develop the best treatment methods for prostate cancer.

Currently, experts are unsure whether operation, radiotherapy or careful monitoring including regular checkups is the best treatment method for prostate cancer.

Additional sources:

http://www.bristol.ac.uk

http://www.bris.ac.uk

http://www.cancer.gov

http://www.nbcnews.com

http://www.cancer.org

http://www.cdc.gov

http://www.cancer.org

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

http://www.ewg.org

http://www.goodhousekeeping.com

http://science.naturalnews.com

Suzanne

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phkrause

Here's an interesting article I came across:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/09/06/survive-prostate-cancer-without-surgery.aspx

The one thing that always gets me thinking if its really legit, is the fact that to get the info you need, you have to fork over some money!! In this case its like $50!! Having said that, the article is still worth reading.

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phkrause

Neem Shows Promise in Prostate Cancer Treatment

By Dr. Mercola

Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men. According to the latest statistics, about 181,000 men get diagnosed with prostate cancer every year in the U.S.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/10/24/neem-prostate-cancer.aspx

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Gregory Matthews

The majority of men who have prostate cancer die, but not from the prostate cancer.  Most, not all, prostate cancer is very slow growing and the men with it will die from something else.

In addition, the majority of men who have an enlarged prostate do not have  prostate cancer.

 

 

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JoeMo
16 hours ago, Gregory Matthews said:

The majority of men who have prostate cancer die, but not from the prostate cancer.

I would expand this statement to say that "all men with or without prostate cancer die". :rollingsmile:

I was a total vegan for more than a decade; and I developed prostate cancer by age 50.  My oncologist told me that the percent  probability of a man having prostate cancer is roughly equal to his age; and that age is by far the largest determinant of one's chances of developing prostate cancer.  The recent  explosion of men developing prostate cancer has more to do with men living longer than anything else.  On the other side of the coin, the older a man is when he develops prostate cancer, the slower the cancer grows.  For men over 70, many doctors prefer to take a "wait and see" strategy to immediate treatment, unless the cancer has progressed beyond stage 2 or is particularly aggressive.

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phkrause

Natural Compounds in Ordinary Foods Beat Prostate Cancer

Adding common foods to your diet can help you beat — or even avoid developing — prostate cancer, hints a study conducted at The University of Texas at Austin. Researchers discovered that several natural compounds found in foods starve cancerous tumors of the nutrition they need to thrive and spread.

http://www.newsmax.com/Health/Headline/compounds-foods-beat-prostate/2017/06/28/id/798743/?ns

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phkrause

Prostate Cancer Test Saves Lives, Risks Remain

Men who get a controversial blood test that looks for signs of prostate cancer appear to have a reduced risk of death from the malignancy, according to a new analysis by an international group of researchers.

http://www.newsmax.com/Health/Health-News/psa-prostate-cancer-screening/2017/09/04/id/811555/?ns

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