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Suzanne Sutton

Just a few minutes of daily exercise alters DNA to help prevent chronic disease

by John Phillip

(NaturalNews) Many people think the genes they inherited at birth are static and predetermine their fate for the remainder of their life. Extensive research into the science of epigenetics is providing startling evidence that this thought process is grossly outdated, and our individual DNA is dynamic and continually influenced by multiple lifestyle factors including diet, environment, stress and physical activity.

Researchers publishing the result of a study in the journal Cell Metabolism provide evidence that that when healthy but inactive men and women exercise for a matter of minutes, it produces a rather immediate change to their DNA. While we cannot change our core DNA code, exercise does influence the DNA molecules within our muscles. Scientists have found that DNA is chemically and structurally altered or expressed in very important ways that affect a myriad of metabolic processes that protect us from chronic disease.

The scientists found that DNA modifications signal precise genetic reprogramming in muscles that determine overall muscle strength as well as structural and metabolic benefits derived from physical activity. Study leader, Dr. Juleen Zierath noted "Our muscles are really plastic ... muscle adapts to what you do. If you don't use it, you lose it, and this is one of the mechanisms that allows that to happen."

Short bursts of moderate intensity exercise positively influences DNA expression

Epigenetic modifications involve the addition or deletion of chemical markers on the DNA strand that change rapidly based on environmental influences such as the nutritional composition of your last meal, pollutants in the environment or the intensity of an exercise workout. Researchers found that DNA within skeletal muscle examined after a short burst of exercise bore fewer chemical markers (specifically methyl groups) than it did before exercise.

The study team specifically determined that the DNA modifications occurred in stretches of DNA that are involved in expressing genes known to be important for muscular adaptation to exercise. This research clearly provides more evidence that our genetic constitution is continually evolving in an effort to protect us, and is positively influenced by short, moderately intense bursts of physical activity. These alterations allow us to adapt quickly to the changing environment that surrounds us.

Dr. Zierath concluded "Exercise is medicine ... and it seems the means to alter our genome for better health may be only a jog away." The finding of this study may explain recent research showing that the best form of exercise works our musculature in short bursts of moderate to full intensity (as measured by attaining maximum heart rate for your age range) for several minutes in duration, followed by a rest period and then another energy burst. Combining this evidence with an organic whole food diet will positively influence your genes toward optimal health.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.cell.com/cell-metabolism/retrieve/pii/S1550413112000058

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/03/120306131254.htm

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/242623.php

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-03/cp-ecy022912.php

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Suzanne Sutton

Exercise boosts healthy DNA expression within just a few minutes

by Jonathan Benson, staff writer

(NaturalNews) Exercise truly is a vital component of good health, as was once again illustrated in a recent study published in the peer-reviewed journal Cell Metabolism. Researchers from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, the University of Copenhagen in Denmark, and Dublin City University in Ireland found that just a few minutes of rigorous exercise is enough to spur almost immediate changes in DNA that improve the ways health-regulating genes express themselves.

For their study, the research team asked a group of young people to undergo an intense, 20-minute workout session on stationary exercise bikes that was designed to get their hearts pumping and their bodies sweating. Upon completion, samples of muscle tissue were examined and compared to samples from those that had not participated in the exercise.

It turns out that, while one's actual genetic code is not changed by exercise, DNA methylation, or the process by which genes are told whether or not to remain "on" or "off," is altered in such a way as to improve normal bodily function. Based on a comparison of skeletal muscle both before and three hours after exercise, Professor Juleen Zierath and her colleagues observed that exercise demonstrably spurs DNA to better transport fats, sugars, and other nutrients throughout the body, as well as protect cells from oxidative damage.

"The changes in methylation and expression for the genes studied are important for mitochondrial function, glucose transport as well as fat transport and oxidation," said Dr. Donal O'Gorman, director of the Centre for Preventive Medicine at Dublin City University, one of the researchers involved in the study. "The findings support the view that regular activity is necessary for metabolic health and the prevention of chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes."

Though the DNA changes were only temporary, they do help illustrate how the body reacts to exercise, and how the muscles being worked by exercise respond in terms of growth and nutrient transport. By getting just a few minutes of rigorous exercise every day, you are essentially teaching your DNA how to distribute nutrients, build muscle, and ultimately improve health.

"Our muscles are really plastic," said Prof. Zierath in reference to the findings. "We often say, 'You are what you eat,' well, muscle adapts to what you do. If you don't use it, you lose it, and this is one of the mechanisms that allows that to happen."

Sources for this article include:

http://www.nhs.uk

http://www.irishtimes.com

http://www.huffingtonpost.com

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Suzanne Sutton

Less time sitting can add two healthy years to your life

by John Phillip

(NaturalNews) Many people believe they must engage in strenuous physical activity to achieve optimal fitness and prevent illness. While exercise is certainly important to health, new research provides a different perspective about the negative effects of sitting for extended periods and how we can make small changes to potentially increase our natural lifespan.

Researchers gleaning data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) have published the result of a study in the journal BMJ Open, that explains how restricting the amount of time spent seated every day to fewer than three hours might boost the life expectancy of US adults by an extra two years. Additionally, they have found that cutting down TV viewing to fewer than two hours every day might extend life by almost 1.4 years.

In the past, studies have implicated sitting for extended periods and watching too much television with illnesses including diabetes, heart disease and stroke. This study is the first to directly link the sedentary lifestyle habits of more than 167,000 people with relative risk of developing or dying from a chronic illness. Researchers pooled data from five relevant studies to arrive at their startling conclusion.

Walking or standing a few minutes each hour may help extend lifespan in aging adults

The scientists pooled all relevant data to develop a statistical tool known as a population attributable fraction (PAF). The PAF is an estimate of the theoretical effects of a risk factor on a population, rather than an individual marker, necessary to calculate the number of deaths associated with time spent sitting down. The researchers determined the PAFs for deaths from all causes linked to sitting time and TV viewing were 27 percent and 19 percent, respectively.

By extrapolating the PAF statistics, the study team determined that cutting the amount of time spent sitting down every day to under three hours would add an extra two years to life expectancy. In a similar manner, restricting time spent watching TV to under two hours daily would extend life expectancy by an extra 1.38 years.

These results are significant because many aging adults spend extended periods of time sitting or lying down as they watch television. Standing or walking for several minutes each hour may provide protection against vascular and metabolic dysfunction, the underlying processes behind the explosion in new cases of cardiovascular disease, stroke and diabetes in our aging population.

Sources for this article include:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2012-000828

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120709231121.htm

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/247603.php

http://www.medpagetoday.com/PrimaryCare/ExerciseFitness/33709

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Suzanne Sutton

Olympic Medalist Stay Alive Longer, Study Says

Athletes who win at the Olympics may bring home more than just a medal: They could add years to their lifespans, scientists have found. Winners of gold, silver or bronze medals lived almost 3 years longer on average than their country's general population--when matched for age, gender and birth year--according to a recent study by BMJ (British Medical Journal) that examined over 15,000 Olympic medalists.

The new study examined decades' worth of data gathered by an organization of Olympics enthusiasts that encompassed medalists from 9 countries or groups of countries including the U.S., Canada, Germany, Russia, France, and a group of Nordic countries, from the first modern Games in 1896 to 2010.

Births and deaths of the athletes were compared with "life tables" of the overall population from their own countries. After 30 years 8% more Olympic winners were alive on average than members of the general population, translating to a gain of 2.8 years of life, according to the study coauthor David Studdert, a public health professor at the University of Melbourne in Parkville, Australia.

Experts, pointing out the great physical activities that winners endure in training, say it was no great surprise that athletes in sports, fared so well in the study.

"The trick to gaining the health advantages of Olympians is to exercise in moderation," says Adrian Bauman, a physical activity epidemiologist at the University of Sydney. He quotes Hippocrates who said walking is man's best medicine. "There's a survival advantage of one to 3 years for physically active people, compared to inactive people in the general population. We make all this fuss about Olympic athletes, but in fact all we really need to do is go for a walk, bike in to work, go for a run...and we can get nearly equivalent benefits." Los Angeles Times, December 14, 2012.

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Suzanne Sutton

Scientists suggest increase walking speeds and outrun the Grim Reaper

by Amelia Bentrup

(NaturalNews) Walk faster to stay one step ahead of Death, according to recent research published in the Christmas edition of BMJ. (During Christmas, this normally formal publication publishes more unconventional articles.) A team of scientists from various schools, hospitals and medical institutions located in Sydney, Australia collaborated to determine the maximum walking pace of the Grim Reaper and the speed necessary to outpace him.

Since the Grim Reaper himself was unavailable for participation in this study, the scientists measured the walking speed and mortality of 1,705 men over age 70 and used receiver operating characteristic curve analysis to estimate the preferred walking pace of the Grim Reaper. Results showed that men who walked faster were less likely to die. It was estimated that the Grim Reaper walks at a rate of approximately 1.8 miles per hour. None of the men who walked at a speed of 3 miles/hour or greater met with Death during the time frame of the study; therefore, the scientists concluded that a walking pace greater than 3 miles/hour is optimal for outrunning Death.

The researchers used data from the Concord Health and Aging in Men Project, which is a study consisting of men over the age of 70 in Sydney, Australia. The researchers used a stopwatch to determine the time it took each participant to walk approximately 20 feet, using the fastest speed of two trials and adjusting walking speed for height. The men were then followed up with by telephone at 4 months intervals and with visits to the clinic at 2 and 5 years after the trial was completed.

It was found that men who walked at speeds greater than 2 miles per hour were 1.23 times less likely to die, while all 22 of the participants who walked at a pace of 3 miles per hour were still alive at the 5-year follow-up. The researchers conclude that "faster speeds are protective against mortality because fast walkers can maintain a safe distance from the Grim Reaper."

Other scientific studies have also shown the correlation between walking speed and mortality. A 2011 study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association examined the relationship between gait speed and survival by pooling the analyses completed for 9 different studies around this topic. It was found that survival increased across the full range of gait speeds. A 2008 study published in the Journal of the American Geriatric Society found that a slower gait was associated with a significantly greater risk of mortality and incident disability. A 2005 study, also published in the Journal of the American Geriatric Society, showed that a gait speed of less than 1 meter/second can be used to identify high-risk individuals for health-related events.

How to Stay Active in Older Age

Keeping up one's fitness level is especially important as one ages. It is likely that gait speed is highly correlated to overall fitness activity and levels. Continuing physical activity is important for maintaining strength, endurance, flexibility and balance. Swimming, walking, hiking, water aerobics and cycling are excellent aerobic activities and provide cardiovascular benefits. Strength training can be accomplished using stretching and resistance machines while exercises such as pilates and tai chi are excellent for improving balance.

No matter what physical activity one chooses, staying active is vital for maintaining a quick step...which is necessary for keeping ahead of the Grim Reaper and his Deathly touch.

Sources for this article include

http://www.bmj.com/content/343/bmj.d7679

http://jama.ama-assn.org/content/305/1/50.full

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1532-5415.2008.01856.x/a...

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16181165?dopt=Abstract&access_num=...

http://ezinearticles.com/?Staying-Active-in-Old-Age&id=4850982

Suzanne

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Suzanne Sutton

Four huge benefits of exercising outdoors

by J. D. Heyes

(NaturalNews) To be sure, exercising outdoors during the winter months in many parts of the country is not easy. Snow, sleet and rain, combined with lower winter temperatures, make it difficult if not impossible to work out in a natural environment, but if you can, you should because it's much better for you in the long run if you do.

"While the allure of the gym - climate-controlled, convenient and predictable - is obvious, especially in winter, emerging science suggests there are benefits to exercising outdoors that can't be replicated on a treadmill, a recumbent bicycle or a track," says The New York Times' Health Blog.

Running outside is much better for your fitness levels. For one thing, you don't run the same inside, on a treadmill, as you do outside, on the ground. Your stride is different, your speed tends to be different (which is to say you tend to run more slowly on a treadmill) so your calorie burn and overall endurance levels take a hit.

When you run outdoors, you flex your ankles differently - you have to, because the contour of the terrain is varied, whereas on a treadmill, if you don't increase the angle, it's the same. Also, when running outside, you can often find yourself running downhill, "a movement that isn't easily done on a treadmill and that stresses muscles differently than running on flat or uphill terrain," the Times said.

And again, studies by the National Institutes of Health found that when running on a treadmill, you expend less energy to go the same distance than if you were running outside. (Tip: If you have to run indoors on a treadmill, bump up the incline to one percent; the NIH says that level more closely resembles running outside).

Cycling outdoors is also more of a workout. Riding a cycling machine in a gym, even if you crank up the resistance, is just not the same as riding a real bike along a real trail that has its ups and downs, for many of the same reasons running outside is better than running on a treadmill, experts say.

According to the NIH, while "the difference between road and laboratory cycling speeds was found to be minimal for small individuals...larger riders would appear to benefit from the fixed resistance in the laboratory compared with the progressively increasing drag due to increased body size that would be experienced in the field."

The larger your body mass, the more wind resistance and, of course, the tougher the ride (which is a good thing if you're trying to achieve fitness and endurance).

You just feel better when you're exercising outdoors. Researchers have shown that those who work out in nature not only achieve better results physically but a) tend to stick with their workout regimen longer; and B) have much better mental fitness and endurance as well.

Volunteers for a number of recent exercise studies were asked to go for two walks for the same amount of time or distance; one inside on a treadmill and the other outside. "In virtually all of the studies," the Times reported, "the volunteers reported enjoying the outside activity more and, on subsequent psychological tests, scored significantly higher on measures of vitality, enthusiasm, pleasure and self-esteem and lower on tension, depression and fatigue after they walked outside."

If you work out in natural surroundings, you'll stick with it longer. Several studies have shown that part of the reason why you become more fit if you exercise outside is because shunning the confines of a temperature-and-environment-controlled gym will make you stick with working out longer, and that you will want to exercise more often.

"It's still a lot of speculation at this point, but if you're having trouble sticking to an exercise routine it might be worthwhile to move those activities outdoors," writes Thorin Klososki at the health blog LifeHacker.com.

Sources:

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21291246

http://lifehacker.com

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22846594

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Suzanne Sutton

Outdoor exercise!

Some choice words from Inspiration:

"Outdoor exercise is best...." "Exercise in the open air should be prescribed as a lifegiving necessity." --Ministry of Healing, 239, 265.

Suzanne

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Gail

Except when one suffers from outdoor allergies... :(

I took up a gym membership. I can suffer all day with hay fever, coughing and having a hard time breathing, but can still work out in the gym- yay!!

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Gail

You know, Suzanne, I should tell you how my life has changed since I did begin to work out.

It feels really good, for one thing. I gave up exercising outside, walking, whatever, because I just can't do it from about Feb/Mar until about October. But a recent visit to my doctor told me I have to do something. I have an inherited tendency toward high cholesterol counts, and that has started to manifest itself. At this point the doctor gave me the option of taking medication for it. But she said, "At this stage I won't order it. You are active, RIGHT?"

I had to admit that, no, I'm not, for the reason that my allergies are too severe. So I took it upon myself to start working out.

And it feels so GOOD to move again! I've been monitoring my blood pressure because it now is bumping up high. I see the doctor in a couple days for that fluctuation because my BP has always up until now been on the low side of normal.

But my muscles are enjoying the movement :) I've also noticed that the hot flashes I've been getting have dwindled down to almost nothing.

I've also gained weight since I started but I am watching my eating some and trying to drink more water. So I anticipate that the fat is changing and the muscles are, too.

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Gordon1

Anyone with cholesterol worries should avail themselves of Dr. Caldwell B. Esselstyn Jr.'s book.

He gives the dietary solution which SDAs can read in the health message, but he's not SDA, and instead discovered it through clinical trials which he structured himself.

He's a retired breast & thyroid surgeon from the Cleveland Clinic, renowned for their cardiac care interventions - bypasses, stents, etc. He chose to treat some very sick patients (multiple bypasses, failed drug therapy - "go home, only months left to live") with a low fat vegan diet, no oil. Twenty years later all his compliant patients were alive and well with reversal of their heart disease.

The book is only 100 pages, plus recipes, a very simple read.

His explanation can be viewed at his website:

http://heartattackproof.com/

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Gordon1

Dr. Esselstyn did not require that his patients exercise,

feeling the dietary change was obligation enough.

Yet they all recovered through diet, and the encouragement of frequent consultation and testing.

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Gail

Thanks, Gordon- will go check that out! I'm all for the stuff that is cheap that you can do at home to help yourself.

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Suzanne Sutton

Exercise found to treat chronic disease conditions better than drugs, with no toxicity

by J. D. Heyes

(NaturalNews) Readers of our site have no doubt heard for years that regular exercise leads to healthier minds and bodies, but new research indicates that physical exercise on a routine basis is just as effective as prescription medications in treating chronic, sometimes deadly, diseases - and without all of the associated drug toxicities.

According to a study published recently in the British Medical Journal, scientists from the London School of Economics, Harvard Medical School and Stanford University School of Medicine wanted to see if the benefits of exercise and drugs from past clinical trials were comparable, in a bid to see if they could extend a person's life.

Doctors should be discussing exercise as therapy with patients

"What we have is a body of research that looks at benefits of exercise alone and then a separate body of research that looks at benefits of drugs on their own," lead researcher Huseyin Naci, a researcher at the London School of Economics and a pharmaceutical policy research fellow at the Harvard Medical School, told FoxNews.com. "There's never been a study that compares these two together, so that's the rationale for this research."

Naci's team examined four areas of health where the evidence suggests or has shown that exercise can have some lifesaving benefits. Those areas were secondary prevention of heart disease, prevention of diabetes, stroke rehabilitation and treatment of heart failure.

FoxNews.com reported:

Researchers then compiled a list of the different classes of drugs people commonly take to manage these conditions, and ultimately came up with 305 randomized clinical trials to analyze. The study involved 339,274 people, 15,000 of whom received physical intervention for their health conditions while the rest were included in drug trials.

Overall, the researchers saw no significant difference between exercise and drug intervention for the secondary prevention of heart disease and the prevention of diabetes. And in the case of stroke patients, exercise was found to be more effective than drug treatment at extending a person's mortality. However, diuretic drugs were found to be more effective than exercise and other drugs for the helping [sic] patients with heart failure.

Given the team's findings, Naci says the study's results indicate that heart disease and diabetes patients should not completely deviate from their current treatment standards.

"One thing that is very much not a takeaway is that patients should stop taking their medications without consulting with their doctors," Naci said. "However, doctors do need to have really candid conversations with patients about the lifesaving benefits of exercise."

And how.

Naci goes on to say, however, that therapies combining both diet and exercise might not be the answer either, because one might work against the other. He points to a recent study published by the Journal of the American College of Cardiology which found that statins, which are commonly prescribed to lower cholesterol, may actually block some of the health benefits of exercise.

Sports medicine should be the avenue of research

What patients really deserve, said Naci, is a better understanding of which are the best treatment options, and for that, more clinical trials would be needed in order to close the knowledge gap.

"We need a lot more research to really tease out the lifesaving benefits from exercise," he said, "as well as which exercise works best for different types of individuals."

The concept of using exercise to combat chronic illness isn't new, according to a separate study published in the British Medical Journal in 2004. But it did not gain respect as a potential treatment modality until the 20th century.

"Today, exercise scientists are exploring the limits of exercise as a therapy - of exercise as a medicine," write G.E. Moore. "Sports medicine doctors, the few physicians who actually know something about both exercise and medicine, ought to be leading this transformation. For every injured athlete, there are a score of patients for whom exercise prescription should be the cornerstone of their medical management."

Sources:

http://www.foxnews.com

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

http://bjsm.bmj.com

http://science.naturalnews.com

Suzanne

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Suzanne Sutton

Exercise not only boosts immunity, it protects you from cancer: study

by J. D. Heyes

(NaturalNews) We all know that regular exercise can certainly improve overall health in often immeasurable ways, but a new study suggests that it could also enhance your immune system and maybe even help protect against cancer.

The small study, conducted by researchers at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in conjunction with the Rocky Mountain Cancer Rehabilitation Institute, found that a large number of the immune T cells in cancer survivors managed to improve their ability to fight disease after they participated in an exercise class for 12 weeks.

"What we're suggesting is that with exercise, you might be getting rid of T cells that aren't helpful and making room for T cells that might be helpful," said researcher Laura Bilek, of the University of Nebraska Medical Center, in a statement.

"If exercise indeed strengthens the immune system and potentially improves cancer surveillance, it's one more thing we should educate patients about as a reason they should schedule regular activity throughout their day and make it a priority in their lives," she added.

'A variety of positive associations between exercise and cancer'

A press release from the American Physiological Society said the exercise program was implemented after patients finished chemotherapy, and that "their immune systems remodel themselves to become more effective, potentially fending off future incidences of cancer."

The new research, presented at the Integrative Biology of Exercise VI meeting Oct. 10-13, which was sponsored by the APS, has yet to be published in a peer-reviewed journal so the findings should be considered preliminary. Nevertheless, researchers said, "previous research had turned up a variety of positive associations between exercise and cancer - notably, that exercise can reduce the risk of getting initial incidences of several different types of cancers, can often improve prognosis in cancer patients, and can reduce the risk of recurrence and secondary cancers survivors of some types of cancers. However, the mechanism behind these phenomena has been unknown."

16 people who survived cancer were included in the study; all but one of whom had just finished chemotherapy. Researchers took initial blood samples from participants and analyzed the numbers of senescent and naive T cells (senescent T cells do not fight disease well, while naive T cells do).

Then, participants went through a 12-week program of exercise where they performed cardio, strength training and flexibility workouts. At the end of the program, researchers drew more blood samples to reexamine T cell levels.

Researchers discovered that in most participants, the ratios of their T cells changed from more senescent and fewer naive T cells to fewer senescent and more naive T cells.

'A litany of positive benefits from exercise'

"What we're suggesting is that with exercise, you might be getting rid of T cells that aren't helpful and making room for T cells that might be helpful," says Bilek, adding that the findings highlight the importance of exercise for everyone, including those suffering from cancer and especially cancer survivors. Both populations could benefit especially from the elevated "cancer surveillance" - the ability of the immune system to find and destroy potential cancers - that the study's findings suggest exercise brings.

"There's a litany of positive benefits from exercise," said Bilek. "If exercise indeed strengthens the immune system and potentially improves cancer surveillance, it's one more thing we should educate patients about as a reason they should schedule regular activity throughout their day and make it a priority in their lives."

Earlier this year, a study published in the journal Cancer hinted that exercise may lower the risk of breast cancer, though scientists from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill said the best way to reduce risk for this disease is to maintain a healthy weight.

Sources:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-10/aps-ecf101112.php

http://www.the-aps.org

Suzanne

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Suzanne Sutton

Study shows inactivity changes the brain, has harmful health consequences

by Antonia

(NaturalNews) "This is your brain . . . and this is your brain on the couch," is Dr. Patrick Mueller, associate professor of physiology at Wayne State University's approach to highlighting the detrimental effects that inactivity has on our brains and hearts.

A recent study published in the Journal of Comparative Neurology demonstrates that inactivity (not just activity, as previously thought) can change the shape of neurons in our brain, an indication that may make couch potatoes more sensitive to stimuli. This sensitivity can upset their nervous system to the point of leading to increased risk for heart problems.

Specifically, the brain changes were noted on rats; ones assessed after regular activity maintained their original brain structure and neurons but those that were inactive sprouted branches resembling tentacles. While branches are a normal way to connect healthy neurons, the inactive rats in this study had more than the typical amount of them, suggesting that a sedentary lifestyle can stress the nervous system. Such "overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system can lead to cardiovascular disease," says Dr. Mueller.

A sedentary lifestyle, not just an active one, changes our brains

"This finding is important because it adds to our understanding of how, at a cellular level, inactivity increases the risk of heart disease," adds Dr. Mueller.

Furthermore, it's important because as recent as 20 years ago, the majority of scientists thought that adulthood marked the time in which our brains were "fixed." That is, once adulthood set in, the belief was that we were unable to create new brain cells or change their shape. However in years since, studies have shown exercise to play a role in helping the brain grow. This study, though, sheds light on the impact of a sedentary lifestyle.

Other research shows that about 60 percent of Americans are not receiving recommended amounts of physical activity and shockingly, that more than 25 percent of adults are not even active at all.

This study once again reinforces the importance activity has in keeping our bodies strong and healthy. We must remain aware of this, not just during American Heart Month, but every month.

Sources for this article include:

exercise.about.com

everybodywalk.org

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

well.blogs.nytimes.com

Suzanne

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Suzanne Sutton

How To Stay Obese: Get Less Than One Hour of Vigorous Exercise a Year

by J. D. Heyes

(NaturalNews) Tens of millions of Americans are obese, and while figures have stabilized in recent years according to government findings, the numbers are still staggering.

Poor dietary choices rank high as a cause of obesity, but another factor -- and in my view, one that gets far less attention -- is Americans' increasing lack of physical activity.

In fact, a new study found that the average obese woman only gets one hour of vigorous exercise per year, while men don't get much more -- less than four per year.

The findings, published in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, stem from the tracking of participants' movements over the course of a year. Researchers collected data regarding the amount of exercise participants engaged in and at what intensity level(s).

Researchers defined vigorous exercise as jogging or other high-cardio-related, fat-burning exercises. For those who were considered extremely overweight, walking may be considered vigorous.

For women especially, researchers cited extremely busy lives as a major reason why they exercised so little. Between work, caring for children and sleep, they noted, women did not have much time in the day to devote to fitness.

"They're living their lives from one chair to another," Edward Archer, a research fellow with the Nutrition Obesity Research Center, told HealthDay. "We didn't realize we were that sedentary. There are some people who are vigorously active, but it's offset by the huge number of individuals who are inactive."

Getting started in a fitness program

Granted, finding the time to work in a fitness program is difficult in today's busy world. But almost everyone has time for some sort of activity 3-4 times per week, if they really want to change their lifestyle.

So, the next hurdle to overcome is actually finding a fitness program that you can stick with. Most people who begin a fitness program don't stick with it, most often because it isn't the right program for them. So I asked a group of fitness experts what they would recommend for someone just beginning a fitness program:

-- Gauge yourself. J. Anderson, certified personal trainer, Natural News contributor and founder/editor of Always Active Athletics, says to take some photos of yourself before you start your program and do some fitness tests, to see where you're at physically. "If you are having a down day" after you begin a program, "you can look at old photographs or re-take your fitness tests to see just how far you have really come." Motivation.

-- Don't attempt too much at first. Ainslie MacEachran, a certified personal trainer and cycling coach with Gemini Training Systems, located in Fort Collins, Colo., says you should set small goals initially. "Break up your goals into little bit size pieces. Instead of trying to do it all at once, make little goals along the way that work towards your ultimate end goal," she told me.

-- Don't go it alone. Get a friend to start a program with you, says expert fitness trainer and former collegiate gymnastics star Kari Pearce of Innovative Fitness Trainers. "Exercising with someone else often makes it more enjoyable and you will want to push yourself harder," she told Natural News.

-- Pick something fun. Kim Evans, a professional fitness coach at Wello in Grand Haven, Mich., says the dance-exercise Zumba might be a good fit for a beginner, mostly because the classes are inviting, not intimidating. "That is a huge deal," she told me, because "many classes can be intimidating for the new exerciser."

Dr. Kim Chronister, a clinical psychologist and author of the book The Psychology Behind Fitness Motivation, agrees. She said in an email that a great way to get "motivated is by finding fun activities to get into (i.e. dancing salsa for one hour or playing water polo for an hour)."

-- Get in the right mindset. In order to stick with any program, you have to decide that it is for the long haul. "When you take the time to transform your thoughts, beliefs and patterns, making lasting change is easy and effortless," Michelle Hastie, of Total Body Health Solutions, said.

-- Don't make excuses. It's easy to blow off your exercise session by convincing yourself that you don't have time today or something else "came up," says Josh Greene, who has a bachelor's degree in in Kinesiology from Indiana University and is currently a personal trainer at Anytime Fitness in Indianapolis. "It takes as little as 20-30 minutes for someone to do a vigorous workout. And doing that 2-3 times per week is much more beneficial than someone doing absolutely nothing," he told Natural News.

Sources:

http://thecelebritycafe.com

http://alwaysactiveathletics.com

http://www.geminitrainingsystems.com

http://innovativefitnesstrainers.com

http://www.wello.com

http://totalbodyhealthsolutions.com

http://consumer.healthday.com

Suzanne

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Suzanne Sutton

Two Hours Of Sitting Effectively Negates 20 Minutes Of Exercise

by L.J. Devon, Staff Writer

(NaturalNews) Sitting down for two straight hours and doing nothing might negate the benefits of a daily 20-minute exercise routine. Idle behavior throughout the day could make an exercise routine worthless in the end. A study from the UT Southwestern Medical Center shows how sedentary behaviors lower cardio respiratory fitness levels.

This might be a concern for those who sit most of the day doing their job or for those who sit routinely in front of the television in the evening. The cardiologists spearheading this study showed that sitting for long periods causes fitness levels to plummet, but they did not investigate ways to offset idle behavior by strengthening the circulatory system through dietary measures.

For every six hours of idle behavior, one hour of exercise is needed to compensate

The UT Southwestern Medical Center study was published in the online edition of Mayo Clinic Proceedings. The cardiologists looked at data from 2223 participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and made associations between sedentary behavior, daily exercise, and fitness levels.

Sedentary behavior include idle activities like watching TV to more engaged activities that still require long periods of sitting like driving a vehicle or reading. In sedentary behavior, the lowest amount of energy is used. (Note, conserving energy is beneficial in some cases when the immune system is depleted.)

Accelerometer data was analyzed from participating men and women between the ages of 12 and 49. The average daily physical activity and sedentary behavior times were recorded. The participants were all healthy, with no known history of cardiovascular diseases, including stroke and asthma. Their fitness levels were recorded using a submaximal treadmill test. After testing cardiovascular performance, the cardiologists compared the data, factoring in variables like age, gender, and body mass index.

In the end, the cardiologists reasoned that six hours of sitting time can have the same magnitude of impact on cardiovascular health as does one hour of exercise. The researchers scaled it down to show that two hours of sitting can negate 20 minutes of daily exercise.

Dr. Jarett Berry, Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine and Clinical Science and senior author of the study said, "Previous studies have reported that sedentary behavior was associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular outcomes; however, the mechanisms through which this occurs are not completely understood. Our data suggest that sedentary behavior may increase risk through an impact on lower fitness levels, and that avoiding sedentary behavior throughout the day may represent an important companion strategy to improve fitness and health, outside of regular exercise activity."

Study encourages workers to interrupt work activities with short walks throughout the day

Berry recommends those who work behind desks to take short walks during lunch and throughout the day, using pedometer to track daily steps. "We also found that when sitting for prolonged periods of time, any movement is good movement, and was also associated with better fitness," said Dr. Jacquelyn Kulinski, lead author of the paper. "So if you are stuck at your desk for a while, shift positions frequently, get up and stretch in the middle of a thought, pace while on a phone call, or even fidget." She urges people to take the stairs instead of the elevator and conduct company meetings while on a walk. She says that standard desk chairs can be replaced with treadmill desks, too.

Dietary factors not included in the study

The cardiologists did not investigate the effects that heart-healthy foods have on the cardiovascular system, including people's fitness levels. Is it possible that omega-3 and 6 fatty acids could compensate for sedentary behavior and improve fitness levels without the person doing much exercise at all? How might heart healthy foods like Hawthorne berry mitigate the negative effects of idle behavior?

Sources for this article include:

http://www.utsouthwestern.edu

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140707141622.htm

Suzanne

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Sojourner

Have to echo some of the comments above, signing up for the gym for me personally was one of the best health decisions that I have ever made. I lost well in excess of 10kg and have bulked up with muscle mass at the same time. Whilst people may not be keen on paying a membership fee, the benefits of being able to train in controlled conditions along with the sheer variety of options for different things you can do makes it worthwhile.

In no particular order I find that these different types of exercises are the best for losing weight,

Rowing Machine

Elliptical Trainer

Beach Walking

Swimming 25m laps

Stair Climbing - either machine or actual!

In terms of Cardio, I found that the Billy Blanks Tae-Bo system is very effective also as it works on muscle strength and toning as well as just giving you a cardio workout.

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phkrause

Do Antioxidants Ease Soreness After Exercise?

New research published in the Cochrane Library this week has found that taking antioxidant supplements before or after exercise to reduce muscle soreness could be ineffective.

https://www.newsmax.com/health/health-news/antioxidants-ease-soreness-exercise/2017/12/26/id/833704/?ns

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phkrause

Muscle Inactivity More Harmful for Older People

A recent study published in The Journal of Physiology points out one reason why it's so important for seniors to remain physically active — and to get active again after a period of enforced inactivity such as hospitalization. Italian researchers found that the same period of inactivity has a greater and more severe impact on the muscles of the elderly than young people. 

https://www.newsmax.com/health/health-news/muscle-inactivity-harmful-seniors/2018/01/05/id/835391/?ns

 

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TheThirdAngel144
On 3/17/2012 at 8:54 PM, Suzanne Sutton said:

Short bursts of moderate intensity exercise positively influences DNA expression

This is good to know. Just this morning, I gave myself to 10 minutes of exercise before studying. It really helps to get the blood flowing, and focusing as well. You aren't too tired to study afterwards either! Praise God!

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