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How to Prevent Coronary Heart Disease

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Suzanne Sutton

Processed Red Meat Increases Risk Of Heart Failure

by PF Louis

(NaturalNews) There are some studies that point to red meat, especially processed red meats, as conducive to heart failure and/or cancer. Recently, perhaps the largest study focusing on processed meats strongly indicates a strong association to heart failure with even moderate consumption of meats processed by salting, smoking, curing, or using additives such as nitrates.

These include cold cuts, salamis, sliced smoked hams, bacon, hot dogs, sausages, deli meats, and those always accessible beef jerkies. It could also be said that even sliced turkey or chicken, and pretty much any processed packaged meats offer similar problems. Processed foods in general are causing most of our health problems.

This latest study was conducted by the Division of Nutritional Epidemiology at the Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden, and Department of Human Nutrition, Warsaw University of Life Sciences using a large cohort of Swedish men. Women are currently being studied.

The study's format and figures

The study started with 37,035 Swedish men 45 to 79 years old with no history of heart failure, heart disease, or cancer in 1998. They were given thorough questionnaires regarding lifestyles and food intakes, then followed up until the study's end in 2010, a total of 12 years. Naturally some of them died of heart failure before 2010, and their demise was part of the statistical evidence.

In case you're wondering how a study would be completed in 2010 and just recently published, consider the factors involved: over 37,000 men involved throughout Sweden, sifting through the questionnaires, checking all the medical records, and the statistical analysis needed to minimize other factors that would contribute or distract from the results.

You could say the tracking period ended in 2010 and compiling the evidence to obtain clear results ended in 2013. The study itself was published after peer review in the journal Circulation: Heart Failure in April of 2014.

At the end of almost 12 years and adjusting their findings by eliminating other variables, the researchers released the following figures:

• Heart failure was diagnosed in 2,891 men and 266 died from heart failure.

• Men who ate the most processed red meat had more than a two-fold increased risk of death from heart failure compared to men in the lowest category.

• Men who ate 75 grams per day or more of processed meats had a 28 percent higher risk of heart failure compared to men who ate 25 grams per day.

• For each 50 gram increase in daily consumption of processed meat, the risk of heart failure incidence increased by 8 percent and the risk of death from heart failure by 38 percent.

A gram is only .035 of an ounce. So 75 grams is 2.6 ounces while 25 grams is just under one ounce, and 50 grams is just under two ounces.

Many SAD (standard American diet) consumers chomp down a few of ounces of bacon or sausage for breakfast, eat one or maybe two quarter-pound hamburgers for lunch, and may often enjoy an eight- to 12-ounce steak for dinner, alternating throughout the day with deli meats and hot dogs.

That's 18 to 25 ounces a day of processed and unprocessed mostly red meats per day, or 504 grams to 700 grams a day (an ounce is 28 grams).

Quality and quantity are both factors

An earlier study focused on red meats in general and showed higher risks of heart failure among those who ate the most red meat.

But as usual, it failed to differentiate between meats from free range grass fed cattle without antibiotics and hormones and polluted factory farm CAFO (confined animal feeding operations) that are fed GMO soybean and corn mash while receiving injected antibiotics and hormones.

Controversial cardiologist Dr. Stephen Sinatra pointed out the earlier red meat study fallacies mentioned and advises eating only uncontaminated, unprocessed red meats from grass fed animals with servings of 3.5 ounces every other day. He recommends buffalo meat.

This author grew up in a heavy meat-eating family and cultural environment and participated heavily, but eventually evolved into occasional Natural News contributor Hesh Goldstein's philosophy: "If it has a face or a mother, I don't eat it!"

Sources for this article include:

http://newsroom.heart.org

http://circheartfailure.ahajournals.org

http://www.drsinatra.com/is-red-meat-safe?promocode=WEB14

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com

Suzanne

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Suzanne Sutton

Adding Almonds To Diet Improves Cardiovascular Health

by David Gutierrez, staff writer

(NaturalNews) Eating a diet rich in almonds improves blood vessel health and reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease, according to a study conducted by researchers from Aston University and published in the journal Free Radical Research.

"Our study confirms that almonds are a superfood," lead researcher Helen Griffiths said. "Previous studies have shown that they keep your heart healthy, but our research proves that it isn't too late to introduce them into your diet -- adding even a handful (around 50g) every day for a short period can help. You could replace a daytime snack with a bag of almonds or add them to your regular meals like porridge or muesli to help reduce your risk of heart problems."

Almonds boost antioxidant levels

The experiment was performed on healthy young and middle-aged men, as well as young men at an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease due to high blood pressure, obesity or other risk factors. The men were assigned either to continue their normal diets or to supplement their diets with a 50-gram snack of almonds daily.

After one month, men in the almond group had significantly higher levels of antioxidants in their blood, particularly the vitamin E chemical alpha-tocopherol. They also had improved blood flow and lower blood pressure. All of these changes are associated with a reduced risk of heart disease.

More specifically, almond consumption improved blood flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and led to a reduction in diastolic blood pressure in all men, and also to a reduction in systolic blood pressure for the healthy men.

Diastolic blood pressure is the pressure experienced by the arteries between heartbeats, while systolic blood pressure is the pressure experienced while the heart is contracting.

No changes were seen in other cardiovascular markers, including nitrite levels, cholesterol levels (HDL and LDL), lipid levels and protein oxidation. However, men who ate almonds did experience a significant increase in their plasma alpha-tocopherol/cholesterol ratios, due to the increase in antioxidant levels.

Nuts are key to Mediterranean diet

The researchers believe that the health benefits observed come from the overall nutrient profile of almonds -- which is high in vitamin E, healthy fats, fiber, flavonoids and calcium -- rather than from any one specific nutrient. For example, vitamin E is an antioxidant that is known to protect against the development of the arterial plaques that can produce heart attacks, while fiber is known to lower cholesterol and help regulate blood sugar.

Prior studies have suggested that eating almonds can provide health benefits as diverse as improving bone health, managing blood sugar, helping to control weight, preventing hair loss and lowering blood pressure and cholesterol. Almonds can even reduce the risk of cancer and other chronic diseases, prevent birth defects, improve cognition (including concentration and memory) and alleviate pregnancy-related constipation.

Many of the nutrients in almonds are common to nuts in general and are believed to partially account for the health benefits of the Mediterranean diet.

The Mediterranean diet is a diet with high consumption of nuts, seeds, legumes, whole grains and olive oil, moderate consumption of fish and poultry, low to moderate consumption of red wine, and with yogurt and cheese as its main dairy foods. Numerous studies have linked this diet to improved cardiovascular outcomes of lower rates of heart attack and stroke. A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in January 2014 also found, for the first time, that the diet also reduces the risk of peripheral artery disease.

Evidence also suggests that the Mediterranean diet may help alleviate depression, control or prevent diabetes and help prevent other chronic health conditions such as dementia.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.sciencedaily.com

http://www.aston.ac.uk

http://www.foodnavigator.com

http://www.ibtimes.co.in

http://www.naturalnews.com

http://www.naturalnews.com

http://www.naturalnews.com

http://science.naturalnews.com

Suzanne

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phkrause

Exercise May Outweigh Impact of Obesity on Heart Disease

Exercising may override the effect of being overweight or obese on heart attack or stroke in middle-aged and elderly people, according to research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

http://www.newsmax.com/Health/Health-News/exercise-outweigh-impact-obesity/2017/03/01/id/776284/?ns

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phkrause

8 Top Supplements to Keep Your Ticker Ticking

Heart disease, including coronary heart disease, hypertension, and stroke, is the No.1 cause of deaths in the United States. It is the leading cause of deaths for both men and women as well as most ethnic groups, including Caucasians, African-Americans, and Hispanics. An American dies every 60 seconds from a heart-related problem.

http://www.newsmax.com/Health/Health-News/supplements-heart-healthy-fish/2017/09/25/id/815592/?ns

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Guest CoQ10 for heart health
18 hours ago, phkrause said:

8 Top Supplements to Keep Your Ticker Ticking

Heart disease, including coronary heart disease, hypertension, and stroke, is the No.1 cause of deaths in the United States. It is the leading cause of deaths for both men and women as well as most ethnic groups, including Caucasians, African-Americans, and Hispanics. An American dies every 60 seconds from a heart-related problem.

http://www.newsmax.com/Health/Health-News/supplements-heart-healthy-fish/2017/09/25/id/815592/?ns

Great to see CoQ10 mentioned! Given its heart-health benefits: https://www.qunol.com/knowing-risks-can-help-prevent-cardiovascular-disease/

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phkrause

Just One E-Cigarette Stresses the Heart: Study

Smoking just one e-cigarette might expose users to enough nicotine to trigger an adrenaline surge in the heart that can contribute to high blood pressure and other health problems, a small experiment suggests.

http://www.newsmax.com/Health/Health-News/electronic-cigarette-heart-risk/2017/09/21/id/814875/?ns

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phkrause

High-Cost Healthy Foods Fuel Heart Risks: Study

Living in an area with little access to fresh and nutritious foods has been linked to high heart disease risk, but a new study suggests that it’s the inability to afford a healthy diet, rather than access, that’s to blame.

http://www.newsmax.com/Health/Health-News/high-healthy-food-costs/2017/09/24/id/815428/?ns

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Outta Here

That drives me nuts! A healthy diet is MORE affordable than a non-healthy, processed food diet. Produce is cheaper than meat. Fresh fruits, vegetables, whole grains and nuts---nutrient dense foods are cheaper. And the benefits one reaps in eating this way---waaaaay cheaper in the long run!

 

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phkrause

Could Skipping Breakfast Fuel Heart Disease?

People who skip breakfast may be more likely to develop atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries, than individuals who start each day with a hearty meal, a new study suggests.

https://www.newsmax.com/Health/Health-News/skipping-breakfast-fuel-heart/2017/10/03/id/817306/?ns

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phkrause

Nuts Tied to Lower Risk of Heart Disease

People who regularly eat a variety of nuts including walnuts, peanuts and tree nuts may be less likely to develop heart disease than individuals who rarely or never eat nuts, a U.S. study suggests.

https://www.newsmax.com/Health/Health-News/nuts-heart-disease/2017/11/13/id/825823/?ns

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phkrause

10 Lifesaving Lessons From a Cardiac Pioneer

Coronary heart disease remains the No. 1 killer of Americans, but cardiology pioneer Dr. William Frishman predicts that one day few, if any, people will die from heart attack.

https://www.newsmax.com/Health/Health-News/heart-disease-cardiology-heart-attack-cholesterol/2017/11/20/id/827217/?ns

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phkrause

Erectile Dysfunction Could Indicate Heart Disease

A new US study has found that erectile dysfunction could indicate those who are at risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), the leading cause of death worldwide. 

https://www.newsmax.com/health/health-news/erectile-dysfunction-indicate-heart/2017/12/19/id/832553/?ns

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phkrause

4 Nuts That Cut Your Heart Disease Risk

Recently, I set up an experiment in a grocery store. I placed four nut mixes on a shelf. Each was labeled differently. One promoted men’s health. Another was labeled as a heart-healthy mix, while a third was just a wholesome nut mix. Finally, the fourth one made no claims at all regarding health; it was just labeled as a deluxe combination of nuts.

https://www.everydayhealth.com/columns/jared-bunch-rhythm-of-life/nuts-that-cut-your-heart-disease-risk/?

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