Jump to content
Kingdom of Adventistan
Sign in to follow this  
phkrause

Trivia

Recommended Posts

dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I  did not know about the adding of  hard hats === goggles===

hand ===face  cream  for the workers  of the bridge was introduce 

for safety of the workers

dgrimm60

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you find some value to this community, please help out with a few dollars per month.

phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know About Samuel Morse

On Jan. 6, 1844, artist turned inventor Samuel F.B. Morse sent out the first message on the telegraph. The telegraph became the standard for long-distance communication around the world until the creation of the telephone. Here are five things you didn't know about Samuel Morse, the telegraph, and Morse Code...

The Abbreviations in Telegrams Were a Precursor to Textspeak

People complain about the abbreviations used in textspeak now—LOL, IDK, and so on—but telegrams contained abbreviated language that was really the precursor of textspeak. Telegrams were paid by the word, except for the word "stop," so people would abbreviate whatever they could and use "stop" instead of a period. "SOS" is a very common abbreviation still in use today that was created during the Morse Code telegram era. Whole sentences might have had their vowels stripped out as well. Even words that looked like they were the same length when written were changed for telegrams if the Morse Code for one word was shorter than the other. For example, instead of reading "ha ha" for laughter in a telegram, you might have seen "hi hi" (as in "hee hee") because the code for "i" was shorter than the code for "a."

Morse Wasn't the First to Find a Way to Send a Telegraphic Message in General

Morse was not the only person working on telegraphic systems, and in fact, a couple of other researchers were able to send telegraphic messages before Morse succeeded. However, those researchers had vastly different systems that required several cables, while Morse was able to create a system that transmitted data along a single cable, which was much simpler to use.

Morse Almost Didn't Get Proper Credit—or Payment—for the Telegraph

Once Morse's telegraph system expanded, he thought he would get lots of money for it, and he should have. However, he almost didn't. Many countries started adding knock-off telegraph systems and wiring and didn't honor his claims or pay the royalties he was due. He had to take his claims to the Supreme Court, where he won on the logic that, while other telegraph systems were in existence before his, he was the one who created the single-wire system that was now ubiquitous.

Morse Code Has Expanded to Include New Symbols and Other Languages

Basic Morse Code works for alphabets that use Roman-style letters. However, the system has been expanded to create Morse-Code equivalents for languages that use non-Roman letters, syllabaries, and even characters. In Chinese Morse Code, for example, special codes that are mapped to Morse Code dots and dashes were created for each character. Japanese Morse Code (called "Wabun") uses codes created for one of the kana syllabaries.

Text-to-Morse-Code Now Exists

Morse Code has seen some dark times lately as it is no longer required for many amateur radio operator license tests. But the military still uses it, and in fact, the U.S. Navy has been testing a system that converts text messages to Morse Code. Someone will type in a text, and the system, called the Flashing Light to Text Converter system, automatically translates the text into Morse Code that is then sent using a ship's lamp light system.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did not  know  about the  Chinese and Japanese creating different  symbols 

for their type of Morse Code

dgrimm60

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
phkrause

5 Facts About The First U.S. Presidential Election

On this day in 1789, America’s first presidential election was held. As expected, George Washington won, and he would win a second term in the next election, but his rise to the presidency wasn't like the presidential campaigns of today.  Here are five facts about the first presidential election...

Washington Didn't Really Want to Be President

George Washington accepted the presidency out of a sense of duty—not out of desire. He actually didn't want to be president, citing his age, his preference for his farm and being retired, and the dual fears that people would oppose him and that his politics-retirement-politics back and forth would make people think he was too inconsistent to be president. However, when he was elected anyway—and he didn't do any campaigning before this—he accepted because he felt he had to answer to the will of the people.

He Was the Only President Ever Elected Unanimously

All the electors in the electoral college voted for George Washington in that first election. Since then, there have been no unanimous electoral votes, though there have been some very close ones. For example, in 1984, Ronald Reagan won his re-election by capturing 49 states (only Minnesota went for his opponent, Walter Mondale).

Martha Washington Got Her Own Inaugural Celebration

First ladies didn't have a formal swearing-in ceremony akin to the presidential inaugurations of today, but Martha Washington's arrival in New York capped off 11 days of celebrations along the route she took and included gun salutes, cheering crowds, ringing church bells, fireworks, serenades, parades, and receptions. And some shoe shopping; she wanted to send gifts back to two grandchildren who did not make the trip with her.

Washington Almost Ended up With the Title of "Your Highness"

The word "president" is not a new one, but Washington's first term was the first time a country had had a president. Previously, presidents merely "presided" over meetings and similarly smallish events. No one had any idea of what title to use for Washington, with some even suggesting "Your Highness," which no doubt frustrated those who wanted to get away from monarchies. Eventually, someone came up with "president," which was low-key and non-royal enough to give Washington a title that indicated leadership without veering into monarchy territory.

Electoral Voters Chose Two Candidates Instead of One

We're used to a presidential candidate choosing a vice-presidential candidate, and then both running on one ticket now. Yet in earlier elections, presidents and vice presidents were often elected separately, resulting in some contentious administrations. In the very first election, the electoral college voted for two candidates, with the majority winner becoming president. The voters did not specify who was to be president and who would be vice president, however—that was decided solely by the numbers of votes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
phkrause

5 Shocking Facts You Didn't Know About Elvis Presley_3

January 8, 1935, marks the birth of Elvis Presley, the man destined to become a legend in rock and roll.  Here are five shocking facts you probably didn't know about Elvis Presley... 

Elvis Failed His Music Class in High School

The Presley family had moved to Memphis from Tupelo in 1948 to find a better life. While there, Elvis was a student at Humes High School, where he was considered a quiet boy and something of an outsider. He also failed music class, but after graduating in 1953, he was the first in his immediate family to complete high school.

He Wasn’t a Brunette

Elvis had sandy blond hair, but he preferred to dye it black, and it’s noticeable when he has his hair cut short after he entered the army. He was reported to have his hair dyed using a combination of Mink Brown by Paramount, along with Miss Clairol 51D, which is called Black Velvet. In his younger days when money was tighter, he was reported to use black shoe polish on his hair.

He Was Only 22 When He Purchased Graceland

In 1957, Elvis spent the princely sum at that time of $102,500 to purchase Graceland, his Memphis mansion. He kept the name for the house, which was in honor of Grace, the great-aunt of the original owners, Dr. Thomas and Ruth Moore. Updates were made to the property over the years, including his famous “jungle room,” a building to play racquetball and the iron gates in front that have a musical theme.

During His Lifetime, Elvis Made One Commercial Endorsement

Anyone would think that a person as famous as Elvis would get many offers to endorse products, but the only commercial he ever appeared in was in 1954 for Southern Donuts. He sings the jingle in the commercial. His good friend, Johnny Cash, also endorsed the donuts, saying to “dunk ‘em and just slurp ‘em.”

Elvis Traded His Expensive Watch for One Worth About $5

Members of Led Zeppelin were big Elvis fans and finally got to meet him in 1973 in Los Angeles, apparently leaving them speechless. John Paul Jones, bassist with the band, could not think of anything to say other than to compliment Elvis on how attractive his watch was. Elvis responded by giving Jones his $5,000 watch and trading it for Jones’ watch, which featured Mickey Mouse and sold for about $5.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did not know  he traded a 5,000 dollars  watch for a  5 dollars Micky Mouse watch===in 1973

dgrimm60

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
phkrause

5 Tricks You Didn't Know Your iPhone Could Do

On January 9, 2007, Apple CEO Steve Jobs unveiled the iPhone, which propelled Apple into becoming one of the richest companies in the world. An iPhone can do many things besides allowing you to communicate.  You probably didn't know these 5 hidden tricks that your iPhone can do...

Your iPhone Stalks You, and That Can Be a Good Thing

Users may not realize it, but their iPhones have been tracking every location they’ve ever been to since they turned it on. You can check this out by going into settings, choosing privacy and then location services, which will give you system services and frequent locations. While this might be a handy feature for some, it could spell trouble for others if they’ve been visiting places they shouldn’t be, and their better half finds out.

Your iPhone Can Help You Hang Pictures

No, you can’t use your phone to pound the nail in the wall, but it can help you get the picture level once it’s hung. Your iPhone comes equipped with a built-in compass. The measure app at the bottom of the screen lets you choose “level,” and you swipe left to turn the screen green and see how straight that picture is and make adjustments if necessary.

You Don’t Really Need the Power Button

Assistive Touch is a handy thing to know if your power button breaks, and you can’t get into your phone. By placing an icon on your screen with Assistive Touch, you can lock your phone and turn it off without using the button. When you plug your phone in, it automatically turns on, making the power button unnecessary.

Siri Can Read You Your Emails

Siri can help you out when you’re busy or driving down the road by reading your emails to you. Siri can even check to see if you received a message from someone specific. All you have to do is tell Siri to read the email messages, and it will read them back to you.

You Can Go Plane Spotting Without Looking Up

Although most people don’t wonder what’s overhead at any given time, some must because your iPhone gives you the ability to see what airplanes are flying nearby. Just issue the command “planes overhead” to Siri, and you will be presented with a table of what’s in the air in your location. If you live near a major airport, this could be nervous breakdown-inducing. Otherwise, it might be a lot of fun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know About John Rockefeller

On January 10, 1870, John D. Rockefeller and a handful of partners incorporated Standard Oil Company, he largest oil refinery in the world of its time. Here are 5 things you didn't know about America’s first billionaire...

Rockefeller Was the First American Billionaire Many Times Over

After started out at age 16 as a bookkeeper in Cleveland. He eventually built an empire that was estimated in 1916 to be worth around $10 billion. By the standards of the 21st century, that amounts to about $336 billion, which would earn Rockefeller a spot as the richest man in American history. That’s much higher net worth than Jeff Bezos, the owner of Amazon.

His Father Was a Scoundrel

William Avery Rockefeller could only be described as a conman who was known to sell fake miracle drugs, herbal remedies and pose as a peddler who was a deaf-mute. His nickname was allegedly “Devil Bill,” and he fathered children not only with his wife but with his mistress, who lived in his home as the housekeeper. In addition, the elder Rockefeller posed as a physician specializing in eye and ear problems, and when he died in 1906, he was buried under the fake name of William Levingston.

Rockefeller Did Not Serve in the Civil War

Rockefeller made it clear that he supported abolition but did not serve in the Civil War, and paid a substitute to take his place, which was common in those days for people who had money. He said he wanted to serve in the military during the war but could not because his family was dependent on the money he made in his business. The business in question was commodities, from which Rockefeller made enough war profit that he was able to begin building his oil company.

Rockefeller’s Iron-Fisted Hold on the Oil Business Was Broken in 1911

At one time, Rockefeller controlled about 90 percent of the oil produced in the United States; however, a Supreme Court case in 1911 ruled that Standard Oil had to be dismantled because the company violated federal antitrust laws. Thirty-four different entities grew from the breakup of Standard Oil, and some of those grew into new mega oil companies such as Chevron and Exxon-Mobil.

Despite His Reputation as a Cheapskate, Rockefeller Was a Major Philanthropist

Rockefeller carried dimes when he went out in public and handed them out to people on the street, so since he was extremely wealthy, there were those who considered him a cheapskate. However, Rockefeller and his son were major philanthropists, donating the land where the United Nations was built and funding Rockefeller Center, which put around 75,000 people to work during the Great Depression. Over the years, Rockefeller donated more than $500,000,000 for religious, scientific and educational purposes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did not  know  about  JOHN D ROCKEFELLER dad as a conman ===also  about  father children

with his  wife and a mistress

dgrimm60

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know About the Grand Canyon

On January 11, 1908, U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt declared the massive Grand Canyon in northwestern Arizona a national monument.  Here are 5 things you didn’t know about one of the world’s natural wonders...

The Grand Canyon Is so Large It Creates its Own Weather

Elevations in the Grand Canyon range from 2,000 feet at the Colorado River in the area of Phantom Ranch to more than 8,000 feet at the North Rim, so the weather can depend on what time of year it is and the location. Along the river, it almost never snows and can get to more than 110 degrees, while at the South Rim it usually doesn’t go higher than the 80s and there are four seasons. For trekkers, there can be more than a 25-degree Fahrenheit difference when making their way from the crest to the bottom of the canyon.

It Holds Lots of Fossils but No Dinosaur Bones

While the rocks in the canyon walls are about one billion years older than the dinosaurs, the canyon itself is much younger than the dinosaurs. However, there are many fossils to be found, including marine fossils that date back more than a billion years. Fossils of land mammals, including sloths and pack rats, found there date back to around 10,000 years ago.

The Most Remote Town in the Country Lies at the Bottom of the Canyon

There is a small town at the bottom of the Grand Canyon named Supai Village, which is a part of the Havasupai Indian Reservation, but visitors have to be physically fit and hike a total of about 10 miles to get there. The population is around 208 people. Mail is still delivered to local residents via pack mule to navigate the tricky slopes.

A Huge Hoax Involving the Grand Canyon Was Perpetrated in 1909

On April 5, 1919, the Arizona Gazette published a story about artifacts and strange caves in the Grand Canyon that were supposedly discovered by two archaeologists funded by the Smithsonian. The pair reportedly discovered, among other things, hieroglyphic-engraved tablets and an idol that resembled Buddha, along with mummies—lots of them. The Smithsonian was quick to put down the story as a hoax, saying that there were never any discoveries of Egyptian or Asian origin found in the country, and no one with the names of the supposed explorers ever worked for them.

It Was a Long Time Before the Grand Canyon Was Explored

Prehistoric humans, back as far as 12,000 years ago and members of the ancient Pueblo people inhabited the canyon, but it wasn’t until the 1540s that Spanish explorers were taken there by Hopi guides. It was an additional 300 years before Joseph Christmas Ives went into the canyon to map the Colorado River in 1858. Ten years later, another explorer, John Wesley Powell, provided a more detailed map of the river after traveling down it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did not  know that there was a  small town  at the bottom of the Grand Crayon===

and that mail  is  still delivered  by pack mule

dgrimm60

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know About All in the Family

On January 12, 1971, the sitcom "All in the Family" premiered on CBS. Here are 5 fascinating tidbits you might not have known about this groundbreaking show...

Mickey Rooney Was Offered the Role of Archie Bunker

Before Carroll O’Connor was offered the role of Archie Bunker, veteran actor Mickey Rooney was offered the part. However, he turned it down right away. Later, Carroll O’Connor said that he based the voice of Archie Bunker on a combination of Jackie Gleason's and James Cagney's voices.

Three Separate Pilots Were Filmed to Find a Sponsor for the Show

When sponsors were sought for "All In the Family," there were plenty of “rural” shows on television, including "The Beverly Hillbillies," "Green Acres" and others. This show was so different that three separate pilots were produced to show to potential sponsors. All of them starred Carroll O’Connor and Jean Stapleton, but the characters of Gloria and Michael were different in each pilot, though Sally Struthers and Rob Reiner continued in those roles. In the 1969 version, Chip Oliver, who was one of the Oakland Raiders, played “Meathead” in the pilot.

The Character of Archie Was Based in Part on Norman Lear’s Dad

Norman Lear’s father had many things in common with Archie Bunker, and Lear said the character indeed was based in part on his dad. His family referred to the elder Lear as “King Lear"; he had his own living room chair that no one else could sit in, and the members of the family shouted all the time. Lear also said his father told him often that he was a “lazy white kid,” so it sounds as though he grew up in a family that was very much like the Bunkers.

Jean Stapleton Was a Big Star on Broadway

In real life, Jean Stapleton was an accomplished singer despite her voice as Edith Bunker. She had performed in the 1950s in "Bells Are Ringing" and "Damn Yankees" both on stage and in film. In addition, she and O’Connor had worked together before in the television drama "The Defenders."

The Show Originally Posted a Mature Audience Warning

CBS expected backlash about the nature of "All In The Family." The network posted a disclaimer that the show made fun of prejudices and human frailties, so it was designated for mature audiences. CBS even hired many extra phone operators to handle the phone calls they expected to receive. It turned out that the audience liked the show, and the only phone calls were complaining that they couldn’t understand the words to the theme song.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know About Johnny Cash

On January 13, 1968, country musician Johnny Cash recorded a live concert at Folsom Prison in California. To celebrate this anniversary in music, here are five things you didn't know about "The Man in Black"...  

The Popular Country Singer’s Name Wasn’t Johnny Cash

It wasn’t unusual in the day and age when Cash was born in 1932 that parents gave their children only initials in place of a name, and that was the case with Johnny Cash. One of his parents wanted to name him Ray, and the other wanted to name him John, so they compromised and named him J.R. It wasn’t until 1950 when Cash went into the Air Force that he needed a first name, so his initials J.R. turned into John R. Cash.

He Was Arrested Several Times Over the Years

Cash was placed under arrest seven times over the years, some of those times for drug use, but he only served one day in jail. This only seemed to help his career because he went to play at prisons for the inmates, producing two albums in 1968 and 1969, “Johnny Cash at Folsom Prison” and “Johnny Cash at San Quentin.” Because he was sympathetic toward those who were imprisoned, he visited prisons to entertain all through his career.

He Saw His Brother Die and Helped Dig the Grave

A tragedy that may have influenced Cash throughout the years was the death of his brother Jack, who was religious and might have become a preacher had he lived. Johnny was only 12 years old when a table fatally injured his brother saw. Jack only lived for about a week after his injury. Johnny helped to dig the grave for his brother, and it was said that his clothes were dirty and he was shoeless at his brother’s funeral service.

The Government Sued Him Over a Forest Fire

While on a trip to California’s Los Padres National Forest with Damon Fielder, his nephew, Cash’s camper caught on fire. The fire spread, burning down more than 500 acres of forest and driving away 49 out of the 53 endangered condors that lived there. He was sued by the Federal Government, which won more than $125,000 in reparations. Cash ended up negotiating the debt and paid about $82,000.

Cash Was a Talented Writer in Addition to Being a Musician

Cash wrote poems and stories, and drew sketches when he was a child. His first published piece was in "Stars and Stripes" after he entered the U.S. Air Force. He also penned two autobiographies, which he wrote out in longhand, that were published as Man in Black and Cash: The Autobiography.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did not know  about  his  name  being just  initials ==J R====also I   did not  know about

him digging  his brothers grave===also I did not know  that the FEDERAL GOVERNMENT 

sue  him for burning down 500 acres

dgrimm60

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
phkrause

The Marriage of Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio

On January 14, 1954, screen star Marilyn Monroe married former New York Yankees center fielder Joe DiMaggio. Today, we honor that anniversary Trivia Today style with 5 things you didn’t know about their relationship...

Marilyn Had No Interest in Meeting the Famed Ball Player

An acquaintance of both had introduced Monroe and DiMaggio, but she had little interest in dating him. She was not interested in baseball or men who played sports professionally. Since he had retired from the New York Yankees as one of their best players, she believed he would be an egomaniac and would be loud and flashy. However, during their date, DiMaggio was quiet, reserved and well-dressed, which piqued her interest in getting to know him better.

They Were Complete Opposites

DiMaggio was a big sports star, didn’t really like to keep himself cultured or go out into the world very much. Marilyn, on the other hand, loved to work on self-improvement, doing things such as attending art exhibits and cultural events and taking college courses. Joe would sit up at home waiting for her, smoking and drinking. This difference in interests contributed to their downfall...

They Were Only Married For 8 Months

Their romance is infamous, but Monroe was only married to second husband Joe DiMaggio for 274 days. Though many things contributed to their divorce, the infamous “subway scene” in The Seven Year Itch, where the skirt of Marilyn’s white dress billows up, was said to have been the last straw. The scene was shot in front of a large crowd of media and bystanders, and DiMaggio became irate over how much she was exposing herself. They fought over it, and according to some reports, DiMaggio got physical.Monroe filed for divorce on the grounds of “mental cruelty” not long after.

After Their Divorce, DiMaggio Would Put on a Disguise to See Marilyn

Following their divorce, Marilyn moved into the Waldorf Astoria. One newspaper reported that DiMaggio would hang out in the lobby of the posh hotel for hours, wearing a false beard and hiding behind a newspaper, so he could get a look at Marilyn as she walked by.

After Marilyn Tragically Died, DiMaggio Regularly Sent Flowers to Her Grave

Long-stemmed red roses arrived at Marilyn’s grave each week for many years until DiMaggio passed away in 1999. She had mentioned that William Powell did this for Jean Harlow, and she hoped someone would do that for her. Since Marilyn died in 1962, flowers were regularly delivered to her at the cemetery for 37 years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know that  he  sent roses  to  her  grave  site  for 37  years===

also  I  did  not  know  that  he wore a false beard and hide behind a  new paper

to  look as  her  walk by

dgrimm60

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know About The First Super Bowl

The first Super Bowl wasn’t exactly super.  On January 15, 1967, the Green Bay Packers faced the Kansas City Chiefs in the first Super Bowl. We'll bet you didn't know these five things about the first AFL-NFL championship game, known retroactively as Super Bowl I...

It Started as a Season End Game Between the NFL and AFL
In 1966, the National Football League (NFL) merged with the American Football League (AFL), and both leagues agreed to play their championship teams against each other on a yearly basis. Vince Lombardi, the legendary coach of the Packers, was pressured to win against the AFL, which had been formed only seven years earlier, and his team was favored to win by 13.5 points. Ultimately, the Packers won against the Chiefs 35 to 10.

The Teams Used Different Footballs

The two-point conversion was disallowed in the first Super Bowl because the NFL did not use it, only the AFL did. In addition, the teams used different balls because the NFL used a Wilson ball and the AFL used one by Spalding, which was narrower, a bit longer and had a surface that was tackier. The teams were allowed to use their preferred football when playing offense.

The First Game Wasn’t Called the Super Bowl

Pete Rozelle, the NFL commissioner, wanted to call the championship game “The Big One” or “Pro Bowl.” It was Lamar Hunt, founder and owner of the Kansas City Chiefs who came up with the name “Super Bowl,” which was apparently inspired by Wham-O’s Super Ball, a popular toy during the 1960s. Broadcasters and journalists apparently liked Hunt’s idea better and started calling it the “Super Bowl” informally—the name was officially adopted the third year.

The Kickoff for the Second Half Happened Twice

NBC and CBS both televised the first Super Bowl, but NBC’s programming was a bit out of sync because of a commercial following an interview on the sidelines with comedian Bob Hope. It was reported that Vince Lombardi wasn’t too pleased when the play was whistled dead by referees. Green Bay had to redo the play so that NBC could show it to television viewers at home.

Tapes of the First Super Bowl Weren’t Saved

It was routine at the time for news stations to erase their game tapes to save money, and NBC and CBS both did so after the first Super Bowl. However, a citizen living in Pennsylvania was found to have a tape of the game in 2005 but wanted $1 million for it. It wasn’t until 2016 that the NFL, using various sources, along with the Pennsylvania tape, managed to reconstruct the game.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did not know that each team used  different balls  during the 1st meeting  of the 2 teams

I also  did not know about the name change  the name

dgrimm60 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know About Prohibition_2

On January 16, 1919, prohibition took effect, which made it illegal in the United States to manufacture, transport or sell liquor. Here are 5 things you didn't know about the long dry spell in American history....

It Wasn’t the First Time Prohibition Had Been Tried

Early in the 1800s, teetotalers and some religious revivalists such as the American Temperance Society held campaigns against what they considered the scourge of alcohol, and it paid off when Maine was the first state to prohibit the sale of alcohol in 1851. Some of the other states followed suit, but these laws were repealed at the insistence of their beer, wine and liquor consuming citizens. Congressmen on Capitol Hill finally decided to take up the matter in the 1910s, in part due to the deep pockets of groups such as the Women’s Christian Temperance Union and Anti-Saloon League.

Prohibition Wasn’t Enforced Nationwide

Federal agents were designated to enforce the new prohibition law, including Eliot Ness of The Untouchables fame. However, the individual states were supposed to enforce the law inside their borders. Many of the governors objected to the added cost and did not appropriate the funds to enforce the law. The state of Maryland, where everyone knew that crabs go best with a cold beer, refused to appropriate any money at all and never enacted a code to enforce prohibition.

Drug Stores Sold “Medicinal” Whiskey

There were notable exceptions to the distribution of alcohol provided under the Volstead Act, including sacramental wines used in churches and temples, which gave rise to a questionable number of priests and rabbis. Drug stores could sell whiskey for medicinal purposes for any ailment that could be conceived of as long as the patient had a doctor’s prescription, and patients could refill that prescription every ten days. Daniel Okrent, a historian of prohibition, said that alcohol sales helped drug store chains such as Walgreens flourish.

Companies That Made Alcoholic Beverages Had to Get Inventive

Some small breweries kept producing their products secretly, but many had to repurpose their factories to stay in business. Anheuser Busch and Yeungling both switched to making ice cream, and Coors upped their production of ceramics and pottery. Most brewers sold malt syrup so that beer could be made at home, winemakers sold grape concentrate, and “near beer” with 0.5 percent alcohol kept their businesses going until the law’s repeal.

During the Great Depression, Lost Revenues Resulted in the Repeal of Prohibition

By late in the 1920s, there were about 30,000 speakeasies in New York City alone, and Detroit’s booze trade was only surpassed in profitability by the auto industry. Because activities of this type slashed into potential tax revenues, there was a strong push for the repeal of prohibition. Franklin D. Roosevelt agreed and included a call for repeal during his presidential campaign in 1932, resulting in his winning the presidency in a landslide and the law’s repeal at the end of 1933.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did not  know that drug stores could sell  whiskey for medical purposes ===

I also did not  know==that the state of MARYLAND and other states did not

enforce the law

dgrimm60

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know About Benjamin Franklin

On January 17, 1706, Benjamin Franklin was born in Boston. A brilliant inventor, publisher, politician, and ambassador, the founding father wore many different hats in his lifetime.  Here are 5  fascinating things you didn’t know about the man on the $100 bill...

Franklin Was Brilliant but Barely Attended School

Franklin only attended Boston Latin School for two years before he went to work in the family’s soap and candle business. Before the age of 12, he was indentured as an apprentice to his brother James in his printing shop. What money Franklin earned he spent on books and practiced writing by reading articles or essays and rewriting them. Even though he was self-taught, Franklin went on to help found what evolved into the University of Pennsylvania and earned honorary degrees from Oxford, the University of St. Andrews, Yale, Harvard and other esteemed learning institutions.

He Retired at age 42

Franklin arrived in Philadelphia in 1723 with little money. However, during the next 20 years, he accumulated enormous wealth through land speculation, his ownership of a print shop and the popular “Poor Richard’s Almanack.” He was able to retire around 1748 and spent the rest of his life studying science, working as an inventor and getting into politics. He served as the sixth president of Pennsylvania, the first postmaster general, as a Continental Congress and Constitutional Convention delegate and was an ambassador and diplomat to Sweden and France, among other things.

Franklin’s Favorite of All His Inventions Was the Glass Armonica

Master composers Beethoven, Strauss and Mozart used his invention of the glass armonica, which is complex but makes a sound similar to rubbing a wet finger along a glass’s rim. Franklin made the first one in 1761 using 37 glass orbs that were all different in size and pitch. This was his favorite invention, and thousands were produced and used by people such as George Washington and Marie Antoinette.

His Son Was a Supporter of the British

Franklin had two children with his wife, Deborah, but also had a son named William, who was illegitimate and born at about 1730. While they were close early on, they had a falling out when Franklin called for the colonists’ independence from England. William stayed a strong Tory supporter, even refusing to resign from his job as royal governor of New Jersey. Because of his opposition to independence, William was jailed in a colonial prison for several years and later moved to England.

Franklin’s List of Inventions Is Amazing

Many people know about Franklin’s invention of bifocal glasses, the Franklin stove and the lightning rod, but those were just a few of the great ideas he came up with. Franklin invented the rocking chair, the old-fashioned school chair with the built-in desk on one side and a urinary catheter that was flexible. In addition, he invented a way to reach books located on high shelves with a mechanical arm, a step stool that could be used in a library by lifting the seat to make a ladder and the odometer so you can see how far you’ve traveled.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

If you find some value to this community, please help out with a few dollars per month.



×