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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did not know that  about  her  hand  bag and what it meant about ending 

conversations and ending the meal

 

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5 Things You Didn't Know About The Boy Scouts

On February 8, 1910, the Boy Scouts of America was incorporated. To celebrate this anniversary, here are 5 things you probably didn’t know about the history of the Boy Scouts...

The Boy Scouts of America Was Formed Using Two Existing Organizations

The Sons of Daniel Boone had been established in 1905 by Daniel Carter Beard, while the Woodcraft Indians was a youth program established in 1902 by Ernest Thompson Seton. This was the basis of the original movement to form the Boy Scouts of America. Two years later, the Girl Scouts of America was formed in Savannah, Georgia, by Juliette Gordon Low.

The First Boy Scout Jamboree Was Cancelled

Boy Scout Jamborees are something that scouts everywhere look forward to, and the first one was scheduled in 1935 in Washington, D.C. in honor of the 25th anniversary of the organization. However, a polio outbreak in the city forced the cancellation of the first Boy Scout Jamboree, and it didn’t actually occur until two years later in 1937. Scouts came from all 48 states to attend, and more than 27,000 camped out near the Washington Monument on the National Mall in celebration of their anniversary.

Boy Scouts in Hawaii Helped After the Bombing of Pearl Harbor

Boy Scouts in Honolulu had been working for months on emergency communications and their skills at first aide when Pearl Harbor was attacked on December 7, 1941. Most Scouts, who were more than 15, were used for communication, delivering messages by bicycle or on foot, answering phones and working in shifts of six hours. In addition, they set up emergency kitchens to serve food, operated first-aid stations and helped to evacuate citizens as well as manning air-raid stations.

The Boy Scout Uniform Has Changed a Lot Over the Years

The original Boy Scout uniform was patterned after the military uniform of the day with leggings, knickers, choke-collar coat and campaign hat. Between 1980 and 2008, the uniforms were designed by Oscar de la Renta, the fashion designer, and were two-tone with decorations on the shirts and a cap that featured a fleur-de-lis. In 2008, the Centennial Scout uniform was introduced to celebrate the BSA’s 100th anniversary.

Many Famous Celebrities Were Boy Scouts

Among the presidents of the United States, the first one to have been a member of the Boy Scouts was John F. Kennedy. Gerald Ford was an Eagle Scout, and Bill Clinton and George W. Bush were both Cub Scouts. Many U.S. astronauts were Boy Scouts, including Eagle Scout Neil Armstrong, Life Scout Edgar Mitchell and Tenderfoot Scout Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin. Celebrities who were members of the Boy Scouts include director Steven Spielberg, sports stars Michael Jordan and Hank Aaron and actors Harrison Ford and Andy Griffith.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I  did  not  know about the 2 different organizations that  became the Boy Scouts===I did not know

that the Boy Scouts in HAWAII help during  PEARL HARBOR attack===

dgrimm60

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phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know about Shirley Temple

On February 10, 2014, Shirley Temple died at age 85. She had a long career as one of the most popular movie stars during the Great Depression and as a diplomat in later life. Here are 5  things you probably didn’t know about Shirley Temple...

Temple Began Her Career at Age Three

She debuted at age three in Baby Burlesks, a satire series of eight films produced in 1923, which starred toddlers. In the films, toddlers acted out adult themes and situations. The children, dressed in diapers and adult clothing, played roles that included World War I soldiers and prostitutes. In Temple’s 1988 autobiography, she referred to them as a “cynical exploitation of our childish innocence.”

Her Mother Did Her Hair

Temple was famous for her head of beautiful curls, but they weren’t that way naturally, nor were artificial curls pinned in among her own. Her mother set her hair each night and always put in exactly 56 curls. Temple understood how her hairstyle was important to her image, and in 1938, when visiting FDR and Eleanor Roosevelt, she passed up on a chance to go swimming because it would ruin her curls.

Temple Tried Out for The Wizard of Oz

Metro held the screen rights to produce The Wizard of Oz, and 15-year-old Judy Garland had been chosen to play the role of Dorothy because of her strong voice. However, Nicholas Schenck, who headed Loew’s, Inc. under MGM, believed the movie needed an established star in order to make a profit since filming the movie was expected to cost around $2 million. Temple sang for Roger Edens, who was an MGM composer, and he reported back that her voice was not robust enough for the part of Dorothy.

She Was the Youngest Performer to Ever Win an Oscar

The Juvenile Oscar was established in 1935 to recognize performers under the age of 18 who deserved to win but would have trouble competing with their adult counterparts. Shirley Temple won the first of these awards in 1935 at age six for her role in Bright Eyes. The trophy itself was a miniature of the Oscar at seven inches tall, and was discontinued in after 1961 when it was last presented to Hayley Mills for her starring role in Pollyanna.

The Former Star Entered Public Service While in Her 40s

Temple was appointed to the United Nations as a U.S. Delegate by President Richard Nixon in 1969. Between 1989 and 1992, she served as the U.S. Ambassador to Ghana, and as the American ambassador to Czechoslovakia under President George H.W. Bush. In addition, she was the first woman to serve as the U.S. Chief of Protocol under President Gerald Ford.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did not  know that  about the curls that  how  her  mom did it  every  night

dgrimm60

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phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know About Nelson Mandela

On February 11, 1990, Nelson Mandela, leader of the movement to end South African apartheid, was released from prison after 27 year.  Here are 5 things you didn’t know about the man who became the first black president of South Africa...

Mandela Spent 27 Years in Prison

A previous leper colony located near the Cape Town coast and called Robben Island Prison was where Mandela spent 17 years of his imprisonment. His small cell had no plumbing or bed, and he was forced to work at a lime quarry doing hard labor. Despite his confinement, Mandela earned a University of London law degree and mentored his fellow prisoners.

He Appeared in a Movie

In the 1992 movie by Spike Lee, “Malcolm X,” Mandela appears at the end. His role was that of a school teacher reciting a speech by Malcolm X to a room of school children from Soweto. However, Mandela, being a pacifist, refused to say the phrase “by any means necessary,” so it was cut from the film.

He Used Disguises to Hide Himself From Authorities

Disguises helped Mandela elude authorities while fighting against South African apartheid. In order to travel around without attracting the notice of authorities, he hid himself by pretending to be a gardener, chauffeur and chef, among others. He was so good at it that he was nicknamed “the Black Pimpernel” after the book The Scarlet Pimpernel, in which the hero has a secret identity.

The Rivonia Trial Led to His Sentence of Life in Prison

Eleven men, including Mandela, were arrested on a farm in the suburb of Rivonia, outside Johannesburg, South Africa, and charged with sabotage. Mandela was already set to serve a five-year sentence for leaving the country illegally and urging workers to strike. Although the U.N. Security Council and many nations condemned the trial, Mandela and four others were found guilty on all four counts, and eight received life sentences. Mandela spent 27 years in prison and was finally released by President F.W. de Klerk in 1990.

Mandela Needed Special Permission to Enter the United States

Mandela was on the watch list for potential terrorists requesting to enter the United States, and he wasn’t removed from that list until he was 89 years old in 2008. Until then, he had to get a waiver granted by the U.S. Secretary of State. The African National Congress (ANC), of which Mandela was a member, was finally removed from the watch list during President Reagan’s term as president.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did not  know that  he was in the  movie  MALCOML X ===I also  did not  know that he wore

many  different  disguises  to elude  authorities

dgrimm60

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phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know about Abraham Lincoln_2

On February 12, 1809, Abraham Lincoln was born in a one-room log cabin in Hodgenville, Kentucky. To celebrate the anniversary of Lincoln's birth, here are 5 things you probably didn't know about one of America’s most admired presidents...

He Lost Multiple Elections Before He Became President

Lincoln ran for the Illinois General Assembly in 1832 and lost. After serving as an Illinois U.S. Senator from 1847 to 1849, he lost a run for a seat in the U.S. Congress and two U.S. Senate races as well as a vice presidential nomination. In 1858, he joined the newly formed Republican Party and went on to win the presidential election against George McClellan by a wide margin.

Lincoln Held a Patent That Revolutionized the Steamboat Industry

Lincoln, while he was a law partner of William Herndon in 1848, invented a bellows system that would help improve a boat’s ability to navigate shallow waters. By using balloons that attached to each end of a boat, when the water became shallow, they could be inflated so the boat would be raised, avoiding the need to unload passengers and cargo. Lincoln’s patented model and drawings are at the Smithsonian Institution on display, but his invention was never put into production.

He Was a Target of the Confederates During a Battle

The Battle of Fort Stevens was fought in northwest Washington, D.C. on July 11 and 12, 1864, and Lincoln was present there when the fort was attacked. It wasn’t surprising that Lincoln would have been an easy target, standing at almost 7-feet tall when wearing his stovepipe hat. Because General Jubal Early realized the fort was being defended by veteran Union soldiers, which made it difficult for Confederate troops to win the battle, he and his troops retreated after dark.

Lincoln Didn’t Want to Attend the Play at Ford’s Theater

Ulysses S. Grant was originally scheduled to attend the play at Ford’s Theater but begged off to make a trip to New Jersey. Since Lincoln’s wife was ill, he was reluctant to go but felt obligated to attend. Lincoln had invited Schuyler Colfax, the Speaker of the House, to attend with him, but Colfax declined because of another engagement. Had all three attended, it would have endangered more men who occupied high positions of power in the U.S. government.

The Secret Service Had Not Been Established

Although Lincoln did have a bodyguard along on that fateful night at Ford’s Theater, the man was not in attendance when John Wilkes Booth shot Lincoln. Ironically, President Lincoln had signed a bill into law authorizing the Secret Service the night before he went to the play.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did not  know  about the  invention  for  ships to  sail in shallow water===

also  about  the invention never went in to  production

dgrimm60

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phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know About Jacqueline Kennedy

On February 14, 1962, First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy gave a televised tour of the White House after a massive renovation project in which she searched for and found missing historical artwork and furniture. Here are five things you didn't know about Jacqueline Kennedy and that tour...

Kennedy's Dedication to Furnishing the White House Stemmed From Her Own Frustration as a Tourist

Jacqueline Bouvier first visited the White House in the 1940s as a tourist and was upset by the fact that she couldn't get information about the history behind the art and furnishings in the house. She knew the house must have had Before parade of objects and art over the years, but there were no informative guides to help her. When she made it to the White House as a First Lady, she made it her mission to bring back all of the historical objects and create a guide for anyone who wanted to know about them.

She Needed No Notes When Giving the Tour to CBS Reporter Charles Collingwood

Kennedy had done such an extensive job restoring the White House that when it came time to film the tour, she was able to tell CBS reporter Charles Collingwood about every piece and room without notes or a script. In fact, she was so good that there was only one scene that had to be filmed again, when she got one person's name wrong.

The Televised Tour Accomplished Two Media Firsts and One Presidential First

Kennedy was the first First Lady to ever give someone a tour of the White House on TV—not that surprising a first given how comparatively young TV was in the early 1960s. However, the special was also the first hosted by a woman, and it was the most successful documentary from CBS at the time. Viewer estimates vary, but one put the total as high as 80 million viewers.

So Many Furnishings Were Languishing in Different Storage That Kennedy Had National Park Service Employees Catalog Each Piece

Prior to Kennedy's efforts, much of the furniture and art that had been in the White House in various administrations was languishing in several different storage areas all over town. The objects were treated like any other, packed away and forgotten. As part of the restoration, the items were reupholstered and restored at the White House and then cataloged by three women who worked for the National Park Service.

Kennedy's Desire to Restore and Record the History of the White House's Furnishings and Art Led to the Formation of the White House Historical Association

Kennedy had a genius idea for funding the restoration. She didn't want to use public money because she knew that the restoration seemed more of a cosmetic project, rather than a historical one. So, she created the White House Historical Association, which is still around today. The association created a guidebook to the White House, and the money earned from those sales became the funding source for the restoration.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know that  she  has tour the WHITE HOUSE in the  1940's====I also did  not

know that  she was instrumental in forming the White House Historical Association

dgrimm60

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phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know About Susan B. Anthony

Women's suffrage advocate Susan B. Anthony was born on this day in 1820. Her tireless work spanned nearly three-quarters of a century and, along with several other women's rights advocates, paved the way for the 19th Amendment's ratification in the 20th century. Here are five things you didn't know about Susan B. Anthony...

Anthony Was a Strong Advocate of Temperance

Temperance is the belief that alcohol is not a part of a productive society, and the temperance movement of the 1800s worked to shut down (or at least severely restrict) alcohol use and sales. Anthony's family had worked with abolitionist and temperance movements since she was a child, and Anthony's first public speaking engagement was at a temperance organization dinner. Anthony and others in the movement wanted to show others how drunkenness and reliance on alcohol damaged families and society.

Her Work With Temperance Influenced Her to Work for Women's Suffrage

Anthony was a member of the Daughters of Temperance. She arrived at a conference run by the sons of Temperance but was refused the opportunity to speak because she was female. That experience led her to the women's suffrage movement because she figured getting women the right to vote would be the only way to convince society. As for that conference, she left and actually called her own conference together.

Anthony Was Arrested for Voting in 1872

Anthony didn't live to see women get the vote, but that didn't stop her from trying to vote anyway. She was arrested for voting illegally in the 1872 election, claiming that the 14th Amendment gave her the right. She fought the charge but was thwarted at most turns; for example, she refused to pay bail, but her lawyer paid it so the case wouldn't go before the Supreme Court, and the judge at the trial actually demanded the jury simply find her guilty. She refused to pay the fine from her sentence, too.

She Was Honored With a Dollar Coin -- That Everyone Confused for a Quarter

In the 1970s, Anthony was chosen to be the face of the new dollar coin. This should have been a great moment, but whoever designed the coin wasn't thinking; it was a silver-colored coin that was about the size of a quarter, meaning that people continually confused the two. The coin ended up being rather unpopular, and while it's still in use today (you can often get them among stamp machine change at post offices), the coin is not in regular circulation among stores and the general public.

Anthony's Headstone Is Routinely Covered With "I Voted" Stickers After Elections

It's become a tradition to go to the cemetery in Rochester, New York, where Anthony's grave is located to put "I voted" stickers all over the headstone. The act was particularly poignant in 2016 when Hillary Clinton ran for president, and again in 2018, when voter turnout was at a high. The stickers are removed after Election Day is over.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that  she was  refused  to  speak at a  temperance  meeting ===then

had  her  own meeting

dgrimm60

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phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know About Fidel Castro

On February 16, 1959, Fidel Castro is sworn in as prime minister of Cuba after leading a guerrilla campaign that forced right-wing dictator Fulgencio Batista into exile. Here are five things you didn't know about Fidel Castro.

Castro Originally Ran for Office in the Pre-Batista Cuban Government

Prior to the Batista regime, Cuba was ruled by Carlos Prio Socarras, who had dumped Cuba back into a well of inefficiency and corruption. In 1952, the country was supposed to have an election in June, and Castro began a campaign to be elected president. Before the elections could take place, however, Batista deposed Prio. The elections were called off.

Despite Initial Support, the U.S. Slowly Came to Oppose Batista

Batista was originally a U.S. ally. While Batista had overthrown the government before his, he was friendly to the U.S. The American government wanted to keep it that way, so they gave Batista support, including initially opposing Castro because of his Communist ideals. It helped that this was actually Batista's second term as Cuban leader; he originally governed form 1940 to 1944 and ran a fairly functional government then. However, over the next few years, Batista's new government slowly devolved into a more violent, oppressive dictatorship that sent turned many Cubans toward opposition leaders and revolutionaries. The U.S. was not happy with what Batista's government was doing, either, and so withdrew support.

Castro Was Nearly Killed When He Returned to Cuba

After spending time in a Cuban prison, Castro was granted amnesty and went to Mexico, where he remained in exile for a couple of years. This is where he became involved with Che Guevara's revolutionaries, and all of them became involved in a plot to overthrow Batista. In December 1956, the group sent Castro and many armed men to Cuba to begin their attempt, but they were met with very heavy resistance that resulted in the death of most of the participants. Castro and a few others were lucky enough to escape into the mountains.

He Was Interviewed by Ed Sullivan

The popular narrative about Castro is that he overthrew a U.S.-friendly government and led a Communist country that opposed the U.S. However, because the U.S. was distancing itself from Batista's regime and its increasing violence, Castro was actually kind of welcomed by Americans after he took over. In fact, Ed Sullivan, the TV show host, interviewed Castro in the town of Matanzas in January 1959. Sullivan was apparently impressed and reportedly was very positive about the future that Castro represented for Cuba.

Castro Was the Target of Some of the Weirdest Assassination Plots to Be Cooked up in the 20th Century

Castro's time as the sweetheart of American international relations eventually ended, and he became a target for assassination. While many of the plots were fairly straightforward, or at least as straightforward as a clandestine plot can be, some of the suggested plans were plain bonkers. For example, Castro liked to scuba dive, so one plan involved planting an explosive seashell at his favorite diving spot. Others involved technology that seemed straight out of the Bond films (or maybe even Get Smart), such as poison delivered with tiny needles that didn't cause any sensation.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know that  CASTRO  ran for president   in 1952===also  I did  not  know that he  

was on the  Ed  Sullivan  T.V. show

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