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5 Things You Didn't Know About Paul Revere's Ride

On April 18, 1775, Paul Revere made his famous ride at midnight to warn colonists that the British were coming. Here are 5 things you probably didn't know about the midnight ride of Paul Revere...

Revere Didn’t Make His Ride Alone

Although Paul Revere did ride to warn colonists the British were coming, he wasn’t the only one warning colonists. Nor did he ride alone. Revere was accompanied by Samuel Prescott and William Dawes, and they split up later, going in different directions.

The Longfellow Poem Had Many Errors

Many people remember Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s poem about the ride of Paul Revere, but the poem states that the signal at Old North Church was for Revere, when he was the one who told another person to spread the warning from the church tower. The poem says dead bodies lay in the yard at Old North Church, although the battle at Lexington didn’t start until the following day. In addition, the poem says that Revere rode into Concord, but he never made it that far because British troops detained him and let him go later.

Revere Originated a Famous Phrase From the Revolutionary War

“One if by land, two if by sea” referred to Paul Revere’s historic ride and was in Longfellow’s poem. A signal by hanging one or two lanterns from the Old North Church in Boston would alert local citizens and patriots if the British troops began to advance toward Concord. One lantern meant that the troops were moving by land, which would give the patriots more time to prepare, while two if by sea meant their movement toward Concord would be much faster.

Revere Was Warned About the British by Dr. Joseph Warren

The evening of Revere’s famous ride, Dr. Joseph Warren sent for him. Warren was both a friend of Revere and the last man left in Boston considered a major leader of the patriots. Warren told Revere that British regulars were planning on marching that night, most likely to Concord, to destroy or capture military stores there.

Revere Borrowed a Horse to Make His Ride

It is unknown whether Revere owned a horse, but even if he did, he had to travel across the Charles River to Charleston on a small boat and would not have been able to take his own horse with him. He borrowed a horse from another patriot named John Larkin to make his ride. Over the years, people have speculated about the horse’s name, however, a genealogy of the Larkin family states that the animal was named “Brown Beauty.”

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phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know about The American Revolution

On April 19, 1775, the American Revolution began with the Battles of Lexington and Concord in the Province of Massachusetts Bay. Here are 5 things you probably never heard about the American Revolutionary War...

The Colonists Were Not Seeking Independence Originally

When the American Revolution began in 1775, colonialists were more interested in greater self-government than they were with separating from the British Empire. In fact, in the petition to King George III, the Continental Congress appealed to him for protection and assured him that independence was not an objective of the colonists. The colonists’ attitude changed when the king and ministers of Britain rebuffed them, so many thought their only option was to strive for independence.

A Minority of Colonists Supported the War

About one-third of the colonists supported and fought with the British during the American War of Independence, and no more than 45 percent supported it. While the Civil War meant that states fought against those from other states, during the War of Independence, people living next door to each other supported opposing sides, creating turmoil.

The British Almost Won the War

During the summer months of 1776, British troops defeated Washington’s troops at Long Island and occupied New York City, chasing the Americans across the New Jersey colony toward the Delaware River. Many of the British officers believed the rebellion would collapse by the time the middle of December rolled around, but it never happened. Washington’s troops surprised the British with a counter attack around Christmas time, raising the colonists’ spirits, so they were encouraged to go on fighting.

After the Battle of Brandywine, Washington Gave General Howe His Dog Back

Evidence in the form of a letter written on October 6, 1777, showed that at least some combatants in the American War of Independence remained gentlemen. Even though Washington lost 150 men, with 500 wounded and hundreds being held by the British as prisoners following the Battle of Brandywine, the American general remembered his manners. Following the battle, a fox terrier that belonged to General William Howe, leader of the British troops, was found, and Washington had the dog returned to Howe with a polite note.

The French Navy Heavily Contributed to America’s Independence

The Royal Navy helped the British army until 1778 by transporting troops up and down the coast and keeping supply lines open. When the French joined the war on the American colonists’ side, that all changed because British outposts that were isolated became vulnerable to American attack. In the fall of 1781, French and American troops hemmed in the British army led by General Cornwallis, and the surrender of those troops ended the American Revolution.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did not  know  that he  has to  use  a  boat  as  well as a  horse  to  warn the  people

dgrimm60

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PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that   GENERAL  HOWE  dog was  taken  during a  battle  then  returned  to  him

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Didn't Know About Marie Curie

On April 20, 1902, scientist Marie Curie isolated the element radium while researching pitchblende, and it won her a Nobel Prize for her work in the new area of radioactivity. Here are 5 things you never knew about Marie Curie...

It Was a Struggle for Curie to Complete Her Education

Marie Curie, born Maria Salomea Sklodowska, grew up in Poland and wanted to attend the University of Warsaw along with Bronia, her sister. However, the university did not allow women to enroll, so they both attended the Flying University, which did allow females. Because it was illegal at that time for women to attend higher institutions of learning, the school changed locations often to avoid being discovered by authorities.

She Won Nobel Prizes in Two Different Sciences

Curie won a Nobel Prize for physics in 1903, along with her French physicist husband, Pierre, and physicist Henri Becquerel for the advances they had made in the subject of radioactivity. In 1911, Curie won a second Nobel Prize in the category of chemistry for her discovery of the elements polonium and radium. Madam Curie is the only person to have ever received Nobel Prizes in two different sciences.

She Met Her Future Husband When She Was Looking for a Bigger Laboratory

Curie began her career in science around the mid-1890s and met her future husband, Pierre Curie, because she was searching for larger laboratory space. She began working in Pierre’s laboratory, and they entered into a romance. They were married in July 1895, and Madam Curie is reported to have worn a dark blue outfit to take her vows in a civil ceremony. She continued to wear her wedding outfit for many years while working in her lab.

Nobel Prize Winners Ran in the Family

The Curie’s little girl, Irene, was 6 when her mother and father won a Nobel Prize in 1903. Irene grew up to marry Frederic Joliot-Curie, and both of them won a Nobel Prize in 1935 for chemistry by discovering “artificial” radioactivity. The Curie’s son-in-law who was married to their daughter, Eve, was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his directorship of UNICEF in 1965.

Madam Curie’s Work Resulted in Her Death

Curie died of aplastic anemia on July 4, 1934, which is believed to have been caused by her long-term exposure to radiation during her career. With this blood disease, the body cannot produce enough red blood cells, leading to fatigue, uncontrolled bleeding and the risk of infection. Her husband, Pierre, had died in 1906 at age 46 when he slipped and fell under the wheels of a vehicle being pulled by horses.

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phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know About The Red Baron

Manfred von Richthofen, a.k.a. the Red Baron, was killed in action on this day in 1918. The flying ace had racked up an impressive 80 in-air victories and had become one of the most feared sights in the sky during World War I. Here are five things you didn't know about the Red Baron...

His Nickname Came From a Plane He Didn't Use for Long

While he'd used red planes for a while, the plane that von Richthofen was best known for was also one that he didn't use for too long. This was a Fokker triplane, painted a bright red, that he started using in 1917. He used it for less than a year, but it's the style of plane that he's most associated with in popular culture, and it may have been the plane that finally got him his "Red Baron" nickname.

He Was Only 25 Years Old When He Died

"Baron" evokes an image of an older, distinguished man, possibly with a mustache; if all you know of the Red Baron is the picture on the pizza box, it's understandable that you'd have that image in your mind. But von Richthofen was only 25 years old when he was shot down. He was an incredibly fast learner who had only joined the Imperial Air Service three years prior, and as careful as he was to protect his squadron, he soon developed a well-deserved reputation for accuracy and aggressiveness.

No One Really Knows Who Finally Shot Him Down

The Red Baron's death is one of those where we know some details for sure, but just enough are hazy to create an air of mystery. It is known that he was shot down on April 21, 1918, and that he was chasing a Sopwith Camel. At this point, the facts start to become jumbled. One Canadian and two Australians have been given co-credit for shooting him down, and there may have been gunfire from both another plane and the ground. There are also reports that a lot of people were firing on him — this would be completely understandable given how important it was to British, Canadian, and Australian fighters to prevent the Red Baron from killing anyone else. Whatever the means, the end was that he crashed into a field, dying quickly afterward.

He Crashed on His First Solo Flight

In 1915, von Richthofen requested a transfer from the army to the air service because he wanted to see more action. He was determined to do more than just work along a supply line. While he had already been awarded a medal for bravery, that wasn't enough for him; long story short, he wanted glory and to make a name for himself. His commanding officer allowed the transfer, landing von Richthofen in the observer's seat of a plane. He soon started training to fly on his own, which didn't look promising at first; he crashed his very first solo flight. But he practiced so much and became so much better that he was soon recruited for a flying squadron led by Oswald Boelcke, then considered the best pilot in Germany's forces.

He May Be More Famous in the United States Now Than in Germany

When the Red Baron died, he was so famous that even the British gave him an honorable send-off. However, now, he may be more popular and better known in the United States than in Germany. Name recognition appears to be fading in his home country, but in the U.S., Snoopy's antics fighting the Red Baron while flying a Sopwith Camel, the Red Baron pizza brand, and even the link with the name of British comedy troupe Monty Python's Flying Circus ("Flying Circus" was the nickname of von Richthofen's squadron and a common name for barnstorming troupes) keep his image alive.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know that  he  was only 25 when  he  died===

dgrimm60

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phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know About Earth Day_2

April 22 is Earth Day, when people from all corners of the world unite to support environmental reform.  Earth Day is intended as a moment to reflect on and help preserve the health of the planet – but here are 5 things that you might not have known about the annual event.

Earth Day Is Responsible for the Beginning of the EPA

Earth Day might not have had a very widespread celebration in its first year (it didn't really become a big national observance until the 1990s), but that first year alone was enough to spur the U.S. government to create the Environmental Protection Agency, or EPA. The agency was created in December 1970, less than a year after the first Earth Day observance. Earth Day and the formation of the EPA were not the first steps taken regarding environmental concern; earlier in 1970, President Richard Nixon formed the Council on Environmental Quality following such environmental disasters as 1969's fire on the Cuyahoga River, in which an Ohio river became so clogged with pollution that the water went up in flames.

April 22 Was Chosen Because It Didn't Conflict With Other U.S. Holidays or Spring Break

April 22 is not a random date by any means, nor is it an anniversary date that the observance is trying to commemorate. April 22 was chosen specifically for Earth Day because it — at least at the time — wasn't a holiday and typically wasn't part of Spring Break for college students, who the organizers of Earth Day were really trying to target. Of course, in typical "If one is good, a lot more must be better" fashion, April 22 is now also National Jelly Bean Day (pretty much every date now has a food holiday associated with it), so be sure you recycle or dispose of any jelly bean bags responsibly. Do not do what the people in Fact #4 did.

A Number of Trees Have an Astronomical Link to Earth Day

Back in 1971, an astronaut on the Apollo 14 mission brought some tree seeds with him as he orbited the moon. The point was partly to see how lowered gravity would affect the seeds and partly to pay tribute to the Forest Service, for which the astronaut used to work. The container holding the seeds broke open prematurely, making the gravity experiment pointless, but many of the seeds were still planted around national monuments, and they still grew normally, forming a select group of trees known as Moon Trees. In fact, they grew so well that NASA and the National Arboretum planted a sycamore that was a second-generation Moon Tree. This was done on Earth Day, no less.

People Celebrating Earth Day Tend to Create a Lot of Trash, Unfortunately

Earth Day has become a worldwide event, with concerts and lots of celebrations. Unfortunately, just as many people have forgotten that Memorial Day was originally about military service and not about advertising sales on backyard grills, many have forgotten that Earth Day is about environmental concern and instead think it's a big party, complete with mountains of trash. Every year there are reports of how an Earth Day celebration at a park or beach left behind tons of garbage scattered across the land, even in eco-friendly cities like San Francisco. The trashing has led to frustration from residents and a rift between them and local officials who haven't been able to get a handle on the situation.

Earth Day Isn't the Only Event or Holiday Dedicated to Planetary Environmental Causes

Earth Day may be the full day dedicated to environmental causes, but it's not the only observance linked to the environment. March also sees a celebration on the Equinox, and when the sun crosses over the equator, a bell is rung at the United Nations, followed by silent prayer. Also, Earth Hour happens at the end of March each year, when people in each time zone turn off their lights, typically around 8:30 p.m. or so, for one hour. However, Earth Hour has created a bit of controversy over how much it really helps. While the energy savings sound impressive at first, the total amount saved during that hour is not very big compared to the total energy used to power cities. Plus, many people respond by burning candles that contribute more pollutants and that create more carbon dioxide.

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phkrause

5 Shocking Facts You Didn't Know About New Coke_2

April 23, 1985, was the day that Coca-Cola announced it was changing the formula for Coke. The ensuing product, New Coke, did not work out, and about three months later, Old Coke came back. Here are 5 shocking facts you probably didn't know about New Coke...

New Coke Would Have Saved the Company $50 Million a Year

If you think Coca-Cola's attempt at launching a new recipe was all just a marketing ploy to boost sales, you're wrong. The "new and improved" recipe was actually a major cost-savings measure by the soda conglomerate. New Coke contained fewer ingredients and was, therefore, cheaper to produce than the classic recipe. If it had taken off the way executives thought it would, the savings would have totaled around $50 million a year. Instead, the company lost at least $30 million on unsold product (though Coca-Cola has never publicly announced the total hit they took). 

It Actually Wasn't a Product Fail

Although the New Coke story has become synonymous with marketing failure, the product itself did not fail. When it was rolled out, three quarters of drinkers polled reported they would buy it again. After the initial boom in sales, New Coke wound up performing about the same as the original formula had been selling at the time. It was determined that the backlash to New Coke was really just the result of people being angry at the absence of the old formula rather than a distaste for the new one.

The Company Received Over 400,000 Letters and Phone Calls About New Coke

In 1985, consumers didn't have the option to hop online and leave bad reviews about New Coke, so they had to do it the old-fashioned way: by phone and mail. Coca-Cola received over 400,000 calls and letters from disgruntled customers in the brief two-and-a-half month window that New Coke was sold in stores. When CEO Roberto Goizueta announced bottlers would have the option of buying both New Coke and Coca-Cola Classic concentrates on July 10, 1985, producers bought the old recipe at a 10 to 1 ratio. The people had spoken: New Coke was out.

The Switch Did Not Help Pepsi

Upon the announcement of New Coke, Pepsi launched a popular ad campaign announcing itself the winner of the "Cola Wars." In actuality, Pepsi performed worse in sales that year than it had the year before. It was beaten by New Coke, Coke Classic, and Cherry Coke, which was also released that year. Turns out that loyal Coke drinkers, when faced with choosing between New Coke or Pepsi, simply chose neither.

Bill Cosby was the Official New Coke Spokesman

Though Mr. Cosby isn't getting any PR work these days, in the mid-eighties he was the king of promotions. His Jell-O commercials live on in infamy, but surprisingly few people remember that Cosby was also the guy brought on to promote New Coke. When the backlash hit, Cosby himself stepped down as the pitchman for Coke, stating that he had lost all credibility. A few months later, Coke replaced Bill Cosby with a pitchman who wound up being equally as popular: Max Headroom.

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phkrause

5 Cool Facts About The Library of Congress

The Library of Congress is celebrating its 219th birthday today, and the Trivia Today team is ready to party! On April 24, 1800, President John Adams approved a $5,000 budget for Congress to purchase over 700 books in what would become the first entries in the Library of Congress. Here are 5 cool facts you didn’t know about the Library of Congress…

The Library Is so Large, It Is Housed in Three Buildings

People who see photos of the Library of Congress are familiar with the Thomas Jefferson Building, which is located across the street from the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. However, there are two other buildings: the James Madison Memorial Building, which is located about one block from the Jefferson Building; and the John Adams Building, next door to the Jefferson. All three buildings are connected underground by a tunnel system.

The Library of Congress Has an Enormous Digital Collection

Many people don’t know that the Library of Congress has placed a large number of its collections online for viewers to see. The online collections include everything from historical documents to photographs and paintings. In addition, the library offers services for the deaf and blind, circulating books by request in either braille or audiobook form to local libraries.

The Library Has the Largest Comic Book Collection in the World

Comic books were introduced in the 1930s, and the Library of Congress has more than 140,000 comics with over 5,000 titles. While most are in print form, others have been placed on microfiche or are reprints such as the original Superman and Wonder Woman. For aficionados, the library has Famous Funnies No. 1, which is considered the first comic book placed in print, and original artwork for Spider-Man.

The Library of Congress Is One Where Your Library Card Won’t Work

The Library of Congress carries this label because it was established for members of Congress and their staff to use as a research library. For this reason, these are the only people who can actually check out a book. However, those over 16 can relax in one of the reading rooms with a book as long as they have a photo reader card.

British Troops Set the Library on Fire

Although the library was established in a permanent city in 1800, it was located in the U.S. Capitol building. British troops burned the Capitol down on August 24, 1814, during the War of 1812, and the 3,000 books held in the library at that time were lost. To rebuild the library, Thomas Jefferson shared 6,487 books from his private collection and was paid $23,950.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know   why  APRIL  22  was  chosen  for  EARTH DAY

dgrimm60

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PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know that the  COCO COLA company  had BILL COSBY was the  official spoke perpson

dgrimm60

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PHKRAUSE

I did not  know that  there were  3 buildings that make up the LIBRAY   OF CONGRESS====I  did not know

that only members  of  congress and their  staff  could  check  out books

dgrimm60

 

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phkrause

5 Surprising Facts About The White House

On April 25, 1947, President Harry S. Truman opened the first White House bowling alley — because even presidents need to have a little fun! Here are 5 surprising facts you didn't know about the White House...

The White House Has its Own Movie Theater

Some houses may have home theaters, but they are no match for the White House movie theater, with armchairs that were installed by President Eisenhower. Originally a cloakroom, the White House theater seats about 40 people and is occasionally used by a president to rehearse speeches. Unlike a normal home theater, the first family can obtain movies straight from Hollywood before films are released to the public.

President Bill Clinton Added a Jogging Track

The jogging track installed during Bill Clinton’s presidency was probably a good idea since he reportedly disrupted the traffic in the area when he was out getting his exercise. The track was funded privately at a cost of about $30,000, and both Clinton and President George W. Bush used the 4-foot-wide jogging path. Clinton also converted a third-floor room into a place to work out, although considering the White House has 132 rooms, it might be exercise enough just finding out where you are at any given time.

There Are Secret Tunnels Leading From the White House

It’s important to keep the president and his staff safe and to make it convenient to reach other buildings, so the White House has a tunnel system that does just that. Accessible through an unmarked storage closet, the tunnel system leads to a bomb shelter beneath the East Wing. During Truman’s presidency, it connected the East and West Wings. There are also tunnels leading to Blair House, the Executive Office Building and the Treasury Building, and possibly others that have never been confirmed.

A Pool or Billiards Table Is a Popular Perk Among Presidents

The first president to have a billiards table in the White House was John Quincy Adams in 1825, although it was a used one that had been refurbished. Abraham Lincoln described himself as a “billiards addict,” and Teddy Roosevelt had a Brunswick table. President George H.W. Bush had a game room on the third floor of the White House, and while it might move to a different room from time to time, many presidents enjoy their leisure time playing a game with friends.

There Is Almost a Mini Mall in the Basement

It can be difficult for the president to go out for something as mundane as getting a tooth filled, so a dentist’s office is located in the White House’s basement underneath the North Portico. A chocolate shop, florist, bowling alley and shops for those who take care of the White House are also there. The basement also houses an old broadcast room used by President Eisenhower.

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phkrause

5 Things You Probably Don't Know About Lucille Ball_3

On April 26, 1989, Lucille Ball died at age 77 from a ruptured aorta following open-heart surgery. Lucille Ball was an actress, comedian, and producer who is best known today for one of the most-loved TV shows of all time, the classic sitcom I Love Lucy. Here are 5 astonishing things you didn’t know about the woman nicknamed "The First Lady of Television"...

She Wasn’t a Natural Redhead

Lucille Ball’s natural hair color was brown, but she dyed it red in 1943 for her role in Du Barry Was a Lady. After the film, she kept her hair the brilliant red color fans associated with her until 1989. Her hairstylist, Irma Kusely, reported in an interview that Ball did not use hair dye to get the desired color, but instead used henna, which the stylist kept in her garage in a locked safe.

Her Father’s Death Caused Her to Become Fearful of Birds

Ball’s father died at the young age of age 28 after he contracted typhoid fever in 1915, which would have been stressful enough for a young child. According to a book written about her in 2003, she only had vague memories of the day her father died. However, she did recall that a bird flew into the house and became trapped, and this gave her such a severe phobia about birds that she would not stay in any hotel room with pictures of birds or birds on the wallpaper.

When Getting Married, Both Lucy and Desi Lied About Their Ages

Ball was born in 1911, and her husband, Desi Arnaz, was born in 1917, so they had an age difference of six years. They were married in 1940 when it was socially unacceptable for a younger man to marry an older woman. To get around this, both listed their birthdates as 1914, so they could marry without criticism.

Ball Almost Drowned While Filming One Episode of I Love Lucy

One episode of I Love Lucy that is popular with viewers is entitled "Lucy’s Italian Movie”. It depicts Lucille Ball stomping grapes in a large vat. However, the scene didn’t go as planned, and Lucy was almost drowned by an Italian woman that was a real grape stomper. The fight in the vat between the women was planned, but the Italian woman spoke little English and may not have understood, so when they began fighting, she held Ball’s head under water and almost drowned her.

A Gun Changed Her Life at Age 16

Ball’s grandfather purchased a gun for Freddy, her brother, in 1927. He was teaching him how to use it when the gun went off accidentally, injuring Warner Erickson, a neighbor, who was eight. Unfortunately, the bullet severed the child’s spinal cord, paralyzing him. It isn’t surprising that the family sued, and Ball states that they lost their home, furnishings and everything else they had.

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B/W Photodude
On 4/20/2019 at 6:25 PM, phkrause said:

On April 20, 1902, scientist Marie Curie isolated the element radium while researching pitchblende, and it won her a Nobel Prize for her work in the new area of radioactivity. Here are 5 things you never knew about Marie Curie...

zJNmhkk.jpg

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

 I  did  not  know  about the  pool or  billiards  table  and that  so  many  presidents  have  use them

I  did not  know about the  mini  mall  in the  basement of the   WHITE  HOUSE with  all the   different shops

dgrimm60

 

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PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  about  her  fear of  birds====I   did  not  know  about  her  lying  about  her  age  with  getting  married

dgrimm60

 

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phkrause
17 hours ago, B/W Photodude said:

zJNmhkk.jpg

That was very inlighting, not sure if that's spelled correctly? But I figure you know what I meant!!

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5 Facts About The Creation Of The Universe

On this day in 4977 B.C., the universe was created, according to German mathematician and astronomer Johannes Kepler, considered a founder of modern science.  Check out these 5 surprising facts about the creation of the universe....

Kepler Was Wrong

Seventeenth-century astronomer Johannes Kepler should have stuck with his theories about the motion of the planets, because it turns out that he was wrong about the age of the universe to the tune of billions of years. Astronomers now estimate the age of the universe at around 13.7 billion years, give or take a few million. The age was calculated by measuring the density of energy and matter in the universe, which determined how fast it expanded billions of years back into the past.

ps: I don't believe Kepler was completely wrong, if he meant the small piece of the universe we live in than I think he's closer to the correct date than the others. But if we really talking about the complete universe, I don't think anyone knows for sure, only God knows.

The Universe Is Flat

Flat Earth Society members may be a bit more cheered after finding out Earth isn’t flat but the universe is. According to the Theory of General Relativity by Einstein, the universe can only be closed, open or flat. Measurements taken in the 2001 NASA exploratory mission, called the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), confirms that the universe is indeed flat.

ps: my thoughts are that is open??

What You See in the Night Sky Is From Long Ago

Wishing upon a star might be a little retroactive, since the twinkling lights we see in the nighttime sky have taken so much time to get to us on Earth that they are really old. What viewers and astronomers see in the night sky is how stars looked in the distant past. For example, Orion’s star Betelgeuse is 640 light years' away, so the light that reaches us would have left Betelgeuse around the year 1370, during the period of the Hundred Years’ War.

The Universe Has No Center

It can be difficult to locate the center of something when it keeps moving, and that’s the problem with finding the center of the universe. The galaxies inside the universe are moving away from each other, which is expanding the size of the universe, and they are apparently moving faster and faster as time passes. Some scientists believe it is dark energy that is driving the universe’s expansion, but only time — and a lot of it —will tell.

ps:I've heard differently

There Might Be More Than One Universe

One controversial hypothesis has been that there are many universes. However, a new study suggests that our universe may have collided with some of them. This supposedly would have left telltale evidence in the light that spread out from the Big Bang by leaving a circular pattern. A study by Stephen Hawking and physicist Thomas Hertog that was modified a few days before Hawking died, suggests that there may be many other universes similar to ours out there in space.

ps:That one word says it all for me!!!!!

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I  agree that only  GOD knows  for  sure  about  how  old the  universe  is

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Didn't Know About Watergate_3

On April 29, 1974, President Richard Nixon announced the release of the Watergate tapes, which included the “smoking gun” that led to Nixon’s resignation.  Here are five things you didn't know about Watergate...

The Bungled Watergate Break-in Wasn't the First

Most summaries of the Watergate scandal focus on the June 1972 break-in that saw burglars nabbed due to poor planning and a guard with good eyes. However, that wasn't the first time operatives from the Committee to Re-elect the President (a.k.a. "CREEP") made their way into the Democratic National Committee headquarters. That was in May 1972, when burglars managed to get into the Watergate complex and offices unnoticed. The burglars stole documents and wiretapped phones but were unable to get more information when it turned out that the wiretaps weren't working. That led to the second burglary attempt.

There Was an Attempt at a Break-in at a Second Building That Failed

One of the co-conspirators charged in the Watergate break-in was a lawyer named G. Gordon Liddy. He was providing legal counsel to the re-election committee, and when the second Watergate burglary was thwarted, he was in the process of trying to plan another break-in at George S. McGovern's headquarters. McGovern went on to become the Democratic nominee in the 1972 elections, only to lose to Nixon, whose reputation was not yet completely sullied by Watergate, as far as the public was concerned.

The Tapes Contained "the Smoking Gun"

When you hear people talk about "smoking guns," especially when comparing Watergate with current political scandals, they're referring back to one piece of conversation on one tape that was released in August 1974. (Tthe tapes and corresponding transcripts were released in batches, often due to multiple court orders that they be released; Nixon was determined to keep as many under wraps as he could). The tape in question contained a recording of Nixon telling the FBI to stop investigating the Watergate break-in shortly after it occurred. This was considered proof that Nixon wanted to cover up the scandal and was the final piece of evidence that led to his resignation.

Nixon Wanted to Show He Had Nothing to Hide -- by Editing the Transcripts

Nixon stalled the release of the tapes and transcripts as much as possible, and when he finally did start releasing them, he edited what he could as well. Initially, he released some tapes, 19 in March of 1974, but in April a subpoena for more tapes appeared. Nixon released only the transcripts to these tapes at first, and the transcripts were edited by Nixon for what he claimed were discussions that were not relevant to Watergate. While he asked if the House Judiciary Committee would want to listen to the tapes and compare them to the transcripts, the editing did nothing to help his case. Eventually, he was forced to turn over the actual tapes, one of which held that all-important order to the FBI.

A Note With a Phone Number Was All It Took to Cast Suspicion on Nixon

When the Watergate burglars were originally caught, there was not a real indication that they were connected to Nixon until detectives investigating the case found that the burglars had the re-election committee's phone number -- and more than one copy of it. While that alone didn't definitively link Nixon himself to the crime, it was enough to move the investigation in that direction.

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phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know About The 1939 World's Fair

On April 30, 1939, the New York World’s Fair opened in New York City. The opening ceremony, which featured a speech by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, ushered in the first day of television broadcasting in New York. Here are five things you didn't know about the 1939 World's Fair...

The Idea for the Fair Stemmed From the Great Depression

The idea to hold a monumental exposition in New York didn't form out of nothing. In 1935, while the Great Depression was still taking its prolonged toll on the economy and society, business leaders decided a large exposition or world's fair would help revitalize the area, both in terms of finances (due to increased labor and payment) and morale. The planners determined that creating a positive showcase for technology and the future could help the area survive the continued economic troubles.

63 Nations Participated In The Fair

Spanning 1,200 acres at Flushing Meadow Park in Queens, the fairground was marked by two imposing structures–the “Perisphere” and the “Trylon”–and exhibited such new technology as FM radio, robotics, fluorescent lighting, and a crude fax machine. Sixty-three nations participated in the fair, which enjoyed large crowds before the outbreak of World War II interrupted many of its scheduled events.  It turned out to be the best-attended event of the first half of the 20th century,

The Fair Had the Original Futurama

Yep. The popular TV show Futurama took its name from the Futurama exhibition at the 1939 World's Fair. This Futurama was a vision of what the world would look like 21 years later, in 1960. It was also called the World of Tomorrow (which was referenced at the beginning of the animated Futurama, too) and contained a conveyor belt that carried observers around a model town, showing off technology. A color TV was demonstrated there, as was a robot that could smoke. (No, really, one of the advertised characteristics of this robot was that it could smoke.) There were predictions of technology like "rocketguns," meant to provide fast trans-Atlantic travel, and a decidedly suburban cast to the whole exhibit.

The Perisphere Contained the Longest Escalator in the World

To enter the Perisphere and get a look at the exhibit inside visitors had to first enter the Trylon and take a ride up a custom made escalator. The escalator into the Perisphere was the longest electric escalator in the world at that time. Once visitors were done inside, they descended via The Helicline. The Helicline was a 950-foot-long, 18-foot-wide curved ramp with a mirrored underside, that led visitors back down to ground level. Since it was one of the highest open-air areas at the fair, the Helicline was a popular spot to take in views of the fairgrounds.

The Fair Gave Many European Culinary Stars a Way out of the Battle Zone

A large portion of the fair was dedicated to food, both to innovations from existing American companies such as the Nabisco icebox cake and a fried version of the Taylor Pork Roll -- Wonder Bread had an entire pavilion and its own wheat field -- and to international displays meant simply for entertainment and gastronomical interest. An unexpected perk for chefs working at the World's Fair was that many of them were able to stay in the United States even as World War II was chewing up Europe. French chefs, in particular, benefited as the French pavilion's restaurant provided the basis for what would become established French restaurants in the U.S.

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