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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know that the Forest Service  knew  that MOUNT ST. HELENS  could erupt  2 months before  it  happened

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5 Surprising About Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis

On May 19, 1994, the former first lady, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, passed away in New York at age 64 from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Find out these 5 surprising facts about this New York socialite who was known for her grace, elegance and style...

She Was Engaged Before She Met Jack Kennedy

Jacqueline Kennedy, whose maiden name was Bouvier, was engaged in 1952 to John Husted, a Wall Street banker. They were engaged for about three months when she broke the engagement off. Rumors were that she did not want to be a housewife and thought Husted was immature and boring.

A Burst Pipe Almost Ruined Her Wedding

For her wedding with John F. Kennedy, Bouvier chose a short-sleeved gown of tissue silk with a bouffant skirt that was designed by African American designer Ann Lowe. A few days before the wedding, a pipe burst at the designer’s and destroyed the wedding gown and the bridesmaids’ dresses. Lowe and her helpers must have worked night and day, but they managed to remake the wedding gown and bridesmaid dresses in time for the ceremony.

She Was a Talented Woman in Her Own Right

Kennedy was a talented writer, poet and artist. She won a six-month junior editing position for Vogue after submitting an essay for a contest but left the job after one day. In addition, she designed original art for a set of holiday cards. The card were printed and sold by Hallmark to benefit the National Cultural Center, which was later renamed the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.

Her Pillbox Hat Was Lost

When President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas, on November 22, 1963, his wife’s pink suit was blood-spattered, but she refused to change, even though Lady Bird Johnson asked her if she wanted to. Her response was that she wanted those who killed her husband to see what they had done, and she continued to wear the suit, even during the swearing-in ceremony for Lyndon Johnson. Although the suit is at the National Archives in Washington, D.C., the matching hat was lost and not recovered.

Her Second Husband, Aristotle Onassis, Was Fined Millions by the U.S. Government

Aristotle Onassis must not have held a grudge against the United States since he ended up marrying President Kennedy’s widow in 1968. Onassis had been investigated in 1954 by the FBI and was fined $7 million for violating American shipping laws. Upon his death in 1975, the family settled $25 million on Jackie Onassis, so she would not try to contest the will.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that she  was engaged to  another man before  she  married  J.F. KENNEDY===

I did  not  know  that her  wedding dress and the maids dresses were  ruined a few  days  before the wedding

dgrimm60

 

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5 Things You Didn't Know About Blue Jeans

On May 20, 1873, Levi Strauss and his partner Jacob Davis received a patent for blue jeans. Here are 5 things you probably didn’t know about the history of these iconic jeans in America...

Blue Jeans Were the Creation of Two Immigrants

Although Levis are an iconic symbol of America, two immigrants were involved in their original design. Strauss had emigrated from Bavaria, and his partner, Jacob Davis, was a tailor from Latvia. Davis was the inventor of the copper rivets for pants with the intention that the pants would be sturdier and last longer, while Strauss put up the money, supplied the fabric and helped to create the pants.

Levi Strauss Did Not Invent Denim

The original Levis were not made of denim, although a number of people think that Strauss was the inventor of the popular fabric. The word denim is a variation of the French words for “from Nimes.” This was a French town that made serge, which was a cotton fabric that was sturdy and had many uses from a heavier grade for military uniforms to a lighter grade for women’s dresses.

The Popular Pants Weren’t Even Called Jeans

The pants were called overalls, which was a name for pants used for work until heartthrob movie actor James Dean appeared wearing them in Rebel Without a Cause. The problem is kids wanted to wear them but weren’t happy with the connotation the word overalls gave them, so they called them jeans. Adults eventually called them jeans too, even though the originals fit like overalls without a bib.

There’s a Reason Jeans Have Rivets

One of the problems of early working men is that their pockets would rip out and needed either repair, or if the problem was bad enough, it would cost them a new pair of pants. Levis sewed the pockets and used rivets to prevent tearing as well as adding a small watch pocket. During the 1930s, the rivets were covered because of complaints that they scratched the furniture, but they were featured on the outside again in 1947.

Jeans Became Popular Because of Dude Ranches

Other than miners, farmers and cowboys, not many people wore jeans until the American craze to visit dude ranches back in the 1930s. After all, it was during the Great Depression, and playing at being cowboys by visiting a dude ranch was a great way for ranchers to pocket a little extra money during those hard times. Visitors would buy a pair of jeans to wear during their dude ranch visit, although even then they were limited to wearing them only on the weekend.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  about  the  rivets  in the  pants to  help  keep  pockets  from  ripping

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Didn't Know About Charles Lindbergh

On May 21, 1927, pilot Charles A. Lindbergh landed his plane, the Spirit of St. Louis, near Paris, and set a record for the first solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean. Here are 5 things you didn’t know about “Lucky Lindy.”...

He Was the First Person Named Man of the Year by Time Magazine

Lindbergh’s daring flight made him a celebrity, and his photo appeared on all the covers of all the magazines and newspapers around the country except for one. Time decided to wait until their following edition came out, which they quickly recognized as a mistake. However, the editors of Time made up for a slow week by devoting a whole issue to Lindbergh, naming him the magazine’s first “Man of the Year.”

Lindbergh Started as a Wing Walker

Lindbergh became interested in flying at Little Falls, Minnesota, when he watched a barnstormer, a pilot who does daredevil tricks in the air. Lindbergh left college when he was 20 and went to work for the Nebraska Aircraft Corporation, which sold and repaired airplanes. Another employee who worked there flew planes for publicity, and Lindbergh performed as a wing walker and finally earned his own pilot’s license in 1925.

He Was More Than a Womanizer

Although Lindbergh was known for being camera-shy, apparently that did not keep him from being shy around the ladies. In addition to his wife, Anne Morrow Lindbergh, by whom he had six children, he had three children by a German woman named Brigitte Hesshaimer, whom he visited yearly and corresponded with over the years under a fake name. In addition, he fathered two more children by Hesshaimer’s sister, Marietta.

Being a Mail Delivery Man Gave Him the Courage to Fly Across the Atlantic

After Lindbergh left the U.S. Army with a rank of second lieutenant, he began working as an airmail delivery pilot on a route between St. Louis and Chicago. The pilots tended to fly at night, and it was a stressful, tiring job since they had to travel in all types of bad weather conditions. Performing this type of dangerous work helped to prepare him for his solo transatlantic flight.

His Plane Had no Front Window

Ryan Airlines Corporation out of San Diego built Lindbergh’s $15,000 airplane, which was called The Spirit of St. Louis. Because the plane had to carry a lot of fuel to make it across the Atlantic, anything that could be removed was to lighten the weight. This included the gas gauge, radio and cockpit window, so Lindbergh looked through a periscope to see where he was going during his 33.5-hour uninterrupted flight.

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5 Secrets About Johnny Carson's '"Tonight Show"

On this day 27 years ago, Johnny Carson made his final appearance on "The Tonight Show." He had been in the hosting seat for almost 30 years, creating one of the best-known late-night talk shows in television history. Here are five surprising secrets about Johnny Carson's Tonight Show...

Carson Wanted to Stop Saturday Reruns, So the Network Created a New Show

When Johnny Carson would go on vacation, the network would show reruns of the Tonight Show. The network would also show reruns on Saturday nights, and Carson asked them to stop doing that. He wanted those reruns kept in reserve for his vacation days — and he wanted more vacation days. The network had to show something in the Saturday night time slot and started looking around for a new show. The one they ended up with was a comedy sketch show that got off to a rocky start but eventually found its footing, called Saturday Night Live.

He Managed to Upset Mr. Rogers

How on Earth does one manage to upset Mr. Rogers? Well, Carson found out the hard way. Carson had created a spoof of Mr. Rogers' show that had the title character encouraging "viewers" to do things like steal money. The skit was meant to be a parody, but Fred Rogers was distressed by it. Carson eventually apologized to Rogers and told him that parodies like that were really created out of affection for the show; Rogers later said that he remembered that advice whenever someone else created a parody of him and his show.

Carson's Treatment of Gary Hart Led the Way for Late-Night Political Skewering

Seeing politics skewered on non-news shows was nothing new; after all, Saturday Night Live had become famous for its pokes at politicians. But Carson had a new effect, one that set the stage for late-night talk shows to become influential in politics. In the run-up to the 1988 presidential election, he criticized Gary Hart so consistently and severely that, when Hart withdrew from the race, there was little doubt that Carson's jabs had affected Hart. The jabs weren't the only reason, but the consistent picking away at Hart certainly kept the controversy surrounding the candidate in the public's mind.

Carson Contributed Jokes to David Letterman's Show

Carson was known for criticizing other talk show hosts, except for David Letterman. Carson was a big fan of Letterman's and started sending jokes to Letterman's show after he (Carson) retired. He'd send them daily, and some would make it on air without crediting Carson. A former Tonight Show producer said that he thought Carson missed the monologue segment of his show and needed an outlet for the jokes he was still thinking up.

He Sort of Created a Toilet Paper Shortage

There is an urban legend that states Carson created a toilet paper shortage by noting (as a joke) on his show that the necessity was about to be in short supply, causing a run on (and then a real shortage) of toilet paper. This is partially true. Carson did make a joke about a shortage, and he is considered to have spurred many to hoard toilet paper, causing a brief shortage. But his joke was based on something a congressman had said earlier (which itself was not really based on anything other than a general shortage of pulp paper). So the public had previous notice of a potential shortage; it was just Carson's broad reach among the viewing public that made his statement so much more effective.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I  did  not  know  that  he  mad  FRED ROGERS  upset===I  did  not  know that  he  gave  David  Letterman 

some  jokes for  his  show

dgrimm60

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phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know About Bonnie and Clyde

On May 23, 1934, police killed the famous outlaws Bonnie and Clyde after a robbery and killing spree that took the lives of 13 people. Here are 5 things you probably didn't know about the famous duo who went down in a blaze of gunfire...

Robbing Banks Wasn’t Really Their Style

Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were famous Depression-era criminals in an era that included John Dillinger, Baby Face Nelson, Ma Barker and Pretty Boy Floyd. They and their gang mostly targeted gas stations, grocery stores and shops, and were known to break open gumball machines for the change. Although they had a reputation as major criminals, their take often came to only $5 or $10, but they committed murders even for this small amount of money.

Bonnie Was Married to Someone Else

Parker had married Roy Thornton, a classmate from school, before she turned 16, but they broke up within months. Thornton went to prison for robbery in 1933 and was killed in an escape attempt in 1937. Parker never divorced her husband, maybe because he was in prison during her escapades with Clyde Barrow. The day that Bonnie and Clyde died in an ambush in 1934, it was discovered that she had a heart-shaped tattoo sporting her name and that of her husband and was still wearing her wedding ring.

Both Bonnie and Clyde Walked With a Limp

An accident in 1933 while Clyde was driving caused their Ford to crash a barricade while doing 70 mph and end up in a riverbed, where battery acid seriously burned Bonnie’s leg. Clyde, while incarcerated at Eastham Prison Farm, chopped off several toes with an ax. Both of them walked with a limp because of their injuries, and Clyde could only drive the car with his shoes off.

The First Crime Clyde Barrow Was Arrested For Involved a Car Rental

The notorious part of his criminal behavior came later, since Clyde’s first arrest was for not returning a Dallas rental car after he visited an old girlfriend from high school in 1926. Although the rental agency didn’t press charges, it stayed on Barrow’s arrest record. A few weeks later he and his brother, Ivan “Buck” Barrow were both arrested when they were caught with a truck full of stolen turkeys.

The Car They Died in Is Displayed at a Casino

Following the shootout that took the lives of Bonnie and Clyde, one of the posse members tried to chaim the bullet riddled Ford V-8 they had been driving; however, a judge said it had to be returned to its owner before it was stolen, a woman named Ruth Warren. Eventually, Warren sold the car to a lecturer on anti-crime who used it as a sideshow attraction. It ended up in Primm, Nevada, about 40 miles from Las Vegas, where it is a lobby attraction at a casino named Whiskey Pete’s, along with other Bonnie and Clyde memorabilia.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that  she  was  married  to  another man====I  did not  know that they  rob gas stations===grocery stores==

and  broke open  gum machines===I did not  know that  his  1st  crime was  not returning  a  rental car

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Didn't Know About Samuel Morse_2

On May 24, 1844, Samuel F.B. Morse demonstrated the telegraph for the first time. Here are 5 things you things you probably didn’t know about this talented artist and inventor...

Morse Was a Talented Artist

Samuel Finley Breese Morse helped pay his way through Yale University by painting portraits and studied painting in England. Some of the commissions he received for portraits were of Presidents James Monroe and John Adams, as well as paintings that were hung in the U.S. Capitol. Probably one of his most famous paintings is of one of the galleries inside the Louvre in Paris, France, where he depicts a number of the famous artworks there.

His Wife’s Death Sparked His Interest in a Faster Method of Communication

Morse was in Washington, D.C. working on a commissioned painting of Lafayette when he got a letter saying that his wife was seriously ill. He left Washington immediately to travel home, but his wife had died and was already buried by the time he got there. He was so grief-stricken that he decided to devote his time from then on to improving communication.

A Teenager Chose the First Words to Be Transmitted by Telegraph

The first words sent by telegraph, “what hath God wrought,” were chosen by Annie Ellsworth, age 17, and the daughter of Henry Ellsworth, the U.S. Patent Office commissioner. Although Morse had held a patent for the telegraph since 1838, it took him until 1844 to receive the funding necessary to institute it. Morse, grateful for the support of Ellsworth, let Annie choose the message, which was sent from Washington, D.C. to Baltimore.

He Exited Public Life With a Flourish

Phone lines went silent in 1922 when Alexander Graham Bell died, and lights were dimmed for the death of Thomas Edison, but Morse was still living when he said his farewell to public life. June 10, 1871, was unofficially declared “Samuel Morse Day,” and a cruise in New York Harbor, parade and dedication of a statue of Morse was held in Central Park in New York City, drawing a large crowd. Telegraph instruments around the country received a message from Morse at the same time, extending his greetings and thanks.

The Supreme Court Had to Rule That Morse Was the Inventor

Upon traveling to Europe after his wife died, Morse met Charles Thomas Jackson, a scientist working on electromagnetism, which inspired Morse to use electricity to send a long-distance message. At the same time, inventors William Cooke and Charles Wheatstone were working on their own electrical telegraphy. They invented a multiple wire system, while Morse’s invention used a single wire, so he was given credit for the invention in the U.S. Supreme Court.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that he  did  paintings  of   famous  people====I  did  not  know  that  his  wife

death  sparked  his  interesting  in  better  communication===

dgrimm60

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phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know About Dracula

On May 26, 1897, Dracula, the classic Bram Stoker novel, went on sale in London. Here are 5 things you probably didn’t know about the story that became known as a masterpiece of Victorian-era Gothic literature...

Rich Food May Have Inspired the Story

Gothic fiction written during the Victorian era often evolved from someone’s nightmare, and Bram Stoker may not have been an exception. Harry Ludlam, his biographer, said Stoker felt a compulsion to write the story after he ate a rich crab dish at supper and had a nightmare involving a vampire rising from his tomb. Stoker left behind notes about the story he wrote, and it is unclear whether they were about his dream or the book he was working on.

Stoker’s Vampire Wasn’t an Original Story

On June 17, 1816, Lord Byron was staying at Lake Geneva, Switzerland, with friends Percy Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin and Dr. John Polidori, who was Byron’s physician, and challenged them to write a ghost story. Mary Godwin, who later became Mary Shelley, wrote Frankenstein, while Dr. Polidori wrote The Vampyre. The gloomy mood that brought forth these stories may have been influenced by the eruption of Mount Tamboro in Indonesia in 1815 that gave rise to severe weather disturbances that caused a year without a summer.

Dracula Was Written Shortly After Jack the Ripper Terrorized London

One influence on Stoker’s writing of Dracula in 1890 might have been the terror that swept London because of Jack the Ripper and his unspeakable crimes, which raised speculation about who the Ripper was and why he was killing women. Both Dracula and the Ripper stalked victims in Victorian England, killed them and then disappeared, seemingly without a trace. Also, the address where Dracula supposedly stored his coffins turns into Flower and Dean streets further up, which is where several of the Ripper’s victims lived.

Count Dracula Could Be Based on Stoker’s Employer

Henry Irving, who owned London’s Lyceum Theatre and was a well-known Shakespearean actor, was Stoker’s boss. Stoker was his secretary, press agent and manager, so he worked long hours, probably for little appreciation. Some have speculated that Henry Irving was the model for Dracula because he was described as egotistic and mesmerizing. But in any event, the famed actor apparently hated the performance of Dracula he saw on stage, calling it “dreadful.”

A Real Exhumation May Have Been the Inspiration for Lucy’s Death

The character of Lucy, who is devampirized by her suitor when he drives a stake into her heart, may be borrowed from a grizzly experience by artist and poet Dante Gabriel Rossetti in 1869. Rossetti’s red-haired wife had died a few years previously, and he placed love poems wound in her hair in the coffin with her. Unfortunately, he changed his mind some years later and had the body exhumed to retrieve the poems, and some of her hair came out in Rossetti’s hand when he did.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did not  know that  most of the people that  wrote GOTHIC FICTION  was because

of eating rich food then  having night mares====

dgrimm60

 

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5 Things You Didn't Know about The Golden Gate Bridge_2

On May 27, 1937, the Golden Gate Bridge connecting San Francisco and Marin County, Calif., opened to fanfare and a week’s worth of celebration. Here are 5 surprising facts you didn’t know about this marvel of engineering that, for many years, was the longest suspension bridge in the world...

Eleven Workers Died During its Construction

Safety was important since the construction of the Golden Gate was extremely dangerous, and all workers were required to use face and hand cream to protect their skin, eat special diets and wear goggles on the job. Several months before the bridge opened, one worker died when a derrick fell and landed on him. Collapsing scaffolding caused many workers to fall a few weeks later,; this incident killed 10, even though safety nets were installed.

You Can Tell the Weather by Looking at the Bridge

The construction of the Golden Gate Bridge allows it to expand and contract with the weather, so you can eyeball the day’s temperature just by looking at the bridge. The deck can either fall or rise by up to 16 feet, depending on how warm it is. However, using this system to see whether you need a coat won’t be terribly accurate since the temperature on the deck is around two hours behind because of the bridge’s thermal mass.

The Bridge Is Equipped With Its Own Foghorns

Two old-fashioned foghorns that are manually operated are located mid-span and at the south tower. They are no longer used, but the foghorns are used to help ships steer out of the bay into the ocean without colliding with the bridge.

The Military Had Suggestions on What Color to Paint the Golden Gate Bridge

The Golden Gate Bridge is painted International Orange to make it more visible for ships, but the other suggested color might have been more glaring and certainly would not have fit in with the surrounding landscape. The U.S. Navy wanted it to be painted in yellow and black stripes like a bumblebee, while the Army Air Corps suggested stripes in white and red, which would have made it look like a giant candy cane.

Thousands of People Walked Across It on Opening Day

There was a week’s worth of partying in San Francisco when the bridge opened, starting on the first day when around 15,000 people each hour were allowed to walk its length with some of them on unicycles and others on roller skates or stilts. They paid 25 cents each for the privilege, and vendors along the road served around 50,000 hot dogs to the massive crowds. In the afternoon, 42 Navy ships passed under the bridge, and the day culminated in a festive fireworks display.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I  did  not know that  there are  2 fog horns to  help  guild the ships  our to  sea====

I did not  know  about the  different  colors  different groups  wanted the bridge to be  painted===

dgrimm60

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5 Facts About The Tomb of The Unknown Soldier

On May 28, 1984, President Reagan led the state funeral at Arlington National Cemetery for an unidentified American soldier killed in the Vietnam War. Here are 5 things you never knew about the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier...

The Unknown Soldier Representing the Vietnam War Was Identified

In 1998, the remains of the unknown Vietnam War soldier were exhumed and a mitochondrial DNA test was performed. He was found to be Michael Joseph Blassie, a 1st Lieutenant in the Air Force whose plane was shot down in 1972 near An Loc. The family of Blassie had the soldier reburied in St. Louis, and while no other unknown soldier took his place at Arlington Cemetery, a plaque was placed there honoring American soldiers missing from 1958-1975.

The Sentries are Members of the 3rd Infantry Regiment

The Sentries at the tomb are chosen from the regiment known as “The Old Guard,” which is distinguished by being the oldest infantry unit that is still active in service. The name comes from General Winfield Scott in 1847, when he called the 3rd Infantry that during a Mexico City victory parade. The 3rd Infantry has been serving the United States since the Revolutionary War.

The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Was Approved by Congress in 1921

Congress passed a bill approving the burial of an unknown World War 1 soldier at the Memorial Amphitheater on March 4, 1921. The sarcophagus, made of white marble, is above the resting place of the soldier, flat on the top and has neoclassical columns with marble wreaths between the columns. Three figures that represent Victory, Valor and Peace are on the east side of the tomb with an inscription on the back that says “Here rests in honored glory an American soldier known but to God.”

The World War I Soldier Was Chosen From Four Who Died in France

Four unknown soldiers who served in World War I were chosen in 1921 on Memorial Day from French cemeteries, and the one to be shipped to the United States to represent all WWI unknown soldiers was chosen by Edward F. Younger, a highly decorated Army sergeant. The deceased soldier that was chosen was shipped to the United States on board the USS Olympia and placed in the Capitol Rotunda until the ceremony that was held on Armistice Day. The ceremony at Arlington National Ceremony was presided over by President Warren G. Harding on November 11, 1921.

The Unknown Soldiers for World War II and the Korean War Were Chosen in 1956

Legislation was passed and signed in 1956 by President Dwight Eisenhower to honor the unknown servicemen of World War II and the Korean War. Two World War II unknowns were chosen from the Pacific and European theaters of war, and the choice was made by William R. Charette, who was the only Medal of Honor Recipient in the Navy who was still on active duty. Army Master Sgt chose the unknown soldier representing the Korean War. Ned Lyle, and both the unknowns, were awarded a Medal of Honor before they were laid to rest at Arlington Cemetery.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

 I did  not  know  how the  unknown  soldiers  for WW 1===WW 2 ====KOREAN  were  chosen====

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Didn't Know About Mount Everest

On May 29, 1953, Mount Everest was conquered as Edmund Hillary of New Zealand and Sherpa Tenzing Norgay of Nepal became the first climbers to reach the summit. Here are 5 things you didn’t know about Mount Everest...

A Missing Camera May Prove That Edmund Hillary Wasn’t the First

In 1924, climbers George Mallory and Andrew “Sandy” Irvine were seen about 800 feet below the summit of Mount Everest and continuing on their way up when the mountain was clouded over by a storm. Mallory’s remains were discovered many years later, but he did not have the camera with him that could have indicated a successful summit. Several expeditions have looked for Irvine, believing that he had the camera with him that could prove their success in reaching the top, but the remains have not been located so far.

Mount Everest Isn’t the Tallest Mountain

Technically, Mount Everest is the highest point on Earth, but that doesn’t make it the tallest. Hawaii’s Mauna Kea is 33,465 feet tall, but the base of the mountain is under the ocean’s surface. Only 13,796 feet of Mauna Kea is above sea level, but it would be 4436 feet taller than Mount Everest if they were placed on an equal level.

Most Climbers Take One of Two Routes to Reach the Top of Mount Everest

Most climbers use one or the other of the many routes up to Everest’s summit, and the most popular heads up the South Col, which is the route taken by Edmund Hillary. The next popular most popular route is along the Northeast Ridge on the side of Tibet. In the first route, climbers have to pass through Khumbu Icefall, where the highest number of climbers have died, while those taking the second route have to navigate several challenging rock climbs.

Trying to Climb K2 or Annapurna Is Much More Dangerous

In 2013, 600 climbers reached the summit of Mount Everest, and nine died along the way, which represents a death rate of 1.5 percent. Annapurna and K2 both have much higher death rates. The death rate for K2 is around 25 percent, while at Annapurna it is 38 percent, which makes scaling Mount Everest a breeze in comparison.

The Bodies of Climbers Who Die Are Left Behind

Most of the around 240 people who have died trying to scale Mount Everest from blizzards, rockslides and other causes are found above 26,000-feet, which has been nicknamed the “death zone.” It would be too dangerous for their bodies to be brought down, so there they remain, and some are used as trail markers for other climbers. The most deadly event occurred in 1996, when a storm killed eight climbers.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know that them  MT MAUNA KEA of  HAWAII is  taller  than MT EVEREST====

dgrimm60

 

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5 Things You Didn't Know About Joan of Arc

On May 30, 1431, the military leader and patron saint of France, Joan of Arc, was burned at the stake in Rouen, France before a crowd of 10,000 people. Here are 5 things you never knew about the young woman who believed she was mandated by God to oust the British from France...

Joan Never Fought in Battle

Joan was lauded as a heroine and warrior during the Hundred Years’ War, but she did not fight in battle. She went along with the French troops as an inspiration and carried a banner instead of a weapon. Despite this, she was wounded twice during the battles she attended, first by an arrow in her shoulder and later by when a crossbow bolt struck her in the thigh.

She Was Nicknamed “The Maid of Orléans"

Visions told Joan to get to Charles, the Dauphin of France, to convince him to expel the British and to help elevate him to be the king of France, so she cut off her hair, dressed in men’s clothing and met with him. She was 17 when she went to the battle at Orleans and was on the front lines to offer inspiration to the soldiers. Although she was injured, she returned to the battle for the final charge, and was nicknamed “The Maid of Orleans.”

Joan of Arc Inspired a Popular 1909 Haircut That Began in France

Joan chopped her hair off after hearing voices that commanded her to put on men’s clothing and help the Dauphin remove the English from her country, so it was cut similar to a pageboy, which was a common style among the knights. A Paris hairdresser picked up the style in 1909, saying that Joan of Arc was the inspiration for the haircut. It became even more popular during the 1920s, and some women still wear this haircut in modern times.

She Was Burned at the Stake for Heresy

The British captured Joan of Arc in 1430 and put her on trial at Rouen, France, charging her with 70 crimes from horse theft to sorcery. By the time May 1431 rolled around, the charges had been reduced to 12, and most of them related to her statement that her involvement in the war was due to God and that she wore men’s clothing. She signed a confession, but later put her male clothing back on and began hearing voices again. She told the judges, so they sent her to be burned at the stake as a relapsed heretic.

Her Brothers Passed off a Fake Joan After She Died

Pierre and Jean, Joan’s brothers, along with a woman named Claude des Armoises, who resembled Joan of Arc, devised a scheme to pass des Armoises off as their sister by saying she had not been executed. They were given festive receptions and gifts galore until des Armoises admitted the ruse to Charles VII, whom Joan had helped elevate to be the leader of France.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that her  brothers  got  another  women  to pretend she  was  JOAN OF  ARC

dgrimm60

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phkrause

5 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Mark Felt

On May 31, 2005, former FBI second-in-command Mark Felt revealed he was the person behind Deep Throat, the secret informant who tipped off Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein to Richard Nixon's connections to the Watergate scandal. Here are five things you didn't know about Mark Felt, the man better known as Deep Throat ..

Felt's Family Wasn't Even Sure if He Really Was Deep Throat

Bob Woodward was very good at protecting the identity of his source, and while rumors abounded over the years, no one knew (other than Woodward) who Deep Throat really was. Even Felt's family didn't know for sure, although they had heard rumors, too. It wasn't until Woodward contacted Felt in 1999 that the family began to find out what happened. When the Watergate scandal turned 25, reporters started contacting the people who had been involved and who were suspected of being Deep Throat, so Felt's daughter, Joan, was not surprised to find yet another reporter at the door. Yet this time, instead of turning people away, Felt spoke with Woodward for a while, and the two remained in contact, with the story gradually unfolding to Felt's family.

Richard Nixon Thought Felt Might Be Deep Throat Back in the Early 1970s

Woodward's efforts to keep Felt's link to the scandal secret were very good, but Felt was still under suspicion. Even as early as 1972, H.R. Haldeman and Richard Nixon both thought Felt might be Deep Throat. However, the feeling at the time was that Felt knew too much about Watergate, and if the administration tried to take him down, he could go public with more details than the administration would want floating around.

His Decision to Leak Information May Have Been Influenced by Losing a Promotion

One of the reasons Felt was under suspicion was that he had been passed over for a promotion to head the FBI, and he was clashing with the new head. It is possible that Felt's decision to talk to Woodward in the early 1970s was influenced by Felt's desire to do good, but it may have also had a tinge of revenge in it. Felt had been in the second-in-command position at the FBI and was a loyal subordinate of J. Edgar Hoover. But when Hoover died and had to be replaced, Felt did not get the job. That may have led to feelings of being underappreciated, which would have made the decision to contact Woodward and Bernstein that much easier.

Carl Bernstein Didn't Meet Felt Until 2008

Bob Woodward's partner at the Washington Post knew Deep Throat's identity but never met Felt in person until 2008. The two reporters had sworn to keep Felt's identity secret until after Felt died (thus creating quite a shock for the reporters when Felt himself started telling everyone through an interview with Vanity Fair). Woodward was so determined not to let anyone know about the connection that Bernstein didn't get to meet the infamous informant in person until the end.

Felt's Decision to Go Public Came About in Part Because of His Health and Because of Bills

Felt went public mainly at the urging of his daughter, but he had a couple of reasons for following through on her suggestions. One was his health. He'd already had a minor stroke, and he and his daughter knew that this could mean time to come forward was running out, and his daughter and other family members thought he could get money for bills if he came forward.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know that NIXION had  and  idea  of  who DEEP THROAT  was

dgrimm60

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