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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that film won Tom Hanks back to  back  Oscars===

dgrimm60

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5 Facts About The Lincoln Assassination Conspirators

On July 7, 1865, four people were hanged after being found guilty of conspiring with John Wilkes Booth to assassinate President Abraham Lincoln. While most of those hung on this date had no doubt been involved, one person's role remains controversial to this day. Here are 5 things you didn't know about the Lincoln Assassination Conspirators...

The Conspiracy Ring Was Larger Than History Books Often Let On

Much of the historical educational material surrounding Lincoln's death focuses mainly on Booth, and then on five conspirators: Mary Surratt, Lewis Powell (also known as Lewis Payne), George Atzerodt, David Herold, and John Surratt, Jr. Yet the total number of people tried by that military commission included four others who were eventually imprisoned. After Lincoln's assassination, officials went after anyone who might have been involved, eventually rounding up a fairly large group whose involvement may or may not have been real. Edman Spangler, for example, faced testimony from witnesses who said he made derogatory remarks about Lincoln before the president arrived at the theater, but then cheered the president when he arrived; Spangler was also accused of preventing a witness from following Booth after the shooting. Dr. Samuel Mudd set John Wilkes Booth's broken leg when Booth was on the run shortly after the assassination and was convicted of conspiracy because he had met Booth before -- once.

Mary Surratt Was the First Woman Executed by the United States Government

Much of the attention during and after the trial of the conspirators focused on Mary Surratt, the owner of the boarding house where Booth and his co-conspirators lived. Surratt and Booth were close, and witnesses talked about how Surratt had mentioned keeping rifles ready for the group. She was found guilty along with the others in the trial and sentenced to death, which was unheard of; in fact, Surratt was the first woman executed by the federal government. Many people went to bat for her, asking that she be imprisoned instead, with a number of members of the military commission who had heard the testimony during the trial sending a recommendation to the president that she not be executed. Then-President Johnson claimed he did not get that recommendation. There is speculation that Surratt's sentence and death were really being used as bait to get her son, who was also accused and who was in hiding, to give himself up.

Surratt's Role Is Still a Subject of Debate

The extent of Surratt's role is still the subject of debate. She was close to Booth, and Booth and his co-conspirators lived at her boarding house for a long time. It's not known if she knew only about the initial kidnapping plots but not the assassination plans, or if she knew about everything. And how much of her trial was based on that attempt to get at her son is also unknown. Given Surratt's personal support of the South in the Civil War, much of the action against her could also have been driven by anti-South sentiment (and in fact, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled a couple of years later that her trial -- and her execution -- were illegal). Yet at the same time, there is speculation that surely she must have known something was up given how long this particular group was at her boarding house.

Despite a Confession, Her Son Was Not Convicted

Mary Surratt’s son, John, was a Confederate agent and surely the conspirator closest to the ringleader-actor. But Surratt was in New York the night of April 14, and after news of the assassination reached him, he fled first for Canada, where a Catholic priest gave him refuge. Eventually identified and captured by American authorities, he was returned to the United States for a civilian trial in Washington, D.C. The jury deadlocked, and Surratt was set free in November 1868. Two years later, he embarked on a public lecture tour, detailing his role in Booth’s early scheme to kidnap Lincoln while denying knowledge of the assassination plot. Public uproar caused Surratt to cancel a second lecture, and he never spoke publicly again about his association with Booth. Surratt died in 1916 at the age of seventy-two.

The $100,000 Reward for the Capture of Booth and his Co-Conspirators was Divided Among 34 Men

Five days after the assassination, Secretary of War Stanton oversaw the creation of a unprecedented wanted poster offering $50,000 for the capture of Booth, and $25,000 each for the apprehension of John Surratt and David Herold. Hundreds of people filed claims for the reward money, however, and there was much acrimony about how to divide up the reward. In the end, Congress awarded $15,000 to detective Everton Conger, $5,250 to Lieutenant Edward Doherty, $3,750 to investigator Lafayette Baker, $3,000 to Baker’s cousin, detective Luther Byron Baker, and $1,654 to each of the twenty-six cavalrymen. The remaining $5,000 was split among four other investigators.

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5 Things You Didn't Know About Betty Ford

On July 8, 2011, former First Lady Betty Ford died. She was 93 and had spent much of the past decades helping people overcome addiction. Outside of being a first lady, she is probably best known for starting the Betty Ford Clinic. Here are five things you didn't know about Betty Ford...

Ford's Alcohol Use Was a Reaction to Painkiller Use

Betty Ford is now well-known for starting her center after seeking treatment herself for alcoholism, but that's a simplified version of her story. Ford turned to alcohol after she had to start taking several painkillers each day for a pinched nerve. She began to take more and more pills and use the alcohol to soothe herself. When she went into rehab, she admitted only to drug addiction at first. It wasn't until another person in rehab refused to admit to alcoholism that Ford suddenly admitted her own battles with alcohol.

She Kept Tabs on Who Was Leaving the Betty Ford Clinic Early and Would Personally Intervene

It wasn't unusual for people seeking treatment at the Betty Ford Clinic to try to leave early. They could have decided they didn't have a problem, that the treatment was somehow beneath them, and so on. Regardless of the reason, Ford would personally intervene and try to convince those people to return to complete treatment. One of these people was Mary Tyler Moore, who did return and who credits Ford's intervention with essentially saving her life.

She's an Example of Why Having a Famous Name on a Clinic Can Be a Good Thing

Ford didn't want the clinic to have her name on it, not out of shame, but because she felt that it took the focus off the rehab purpose of the center. However, her husband and several other people convinced her to keep her name on the clinic because having that famous name made it easier for people to admit to having problems. The idea was that, if a former First Lady could publicly own her problems, then everyone else could, too.

Ford Originally Had a Chance to Be a Professional Dancer

Ford nearly had a very different life, and she likely would have continued down another path had it not been for her mother's worry about her not being married. Ford used to study dance with the esteemed Martha Graham and actually performed in shows. However, her mother pressured her to return home and get married. Ford chose her mother's route; Graham's strict regimens clashed with Ford's desire to socialize more, though how much of this clash played a role in Ford's decision to leave is unknown.

She Was Ahead of Her Time in More Ways Than One

Ford was not only an independent young woman who nearly chose dance over marriage, and she was not only one of the few public figures in the 1970s to push so publicly for rehab. She was also a divorcee. That sounds mundane now, but her divorce took place in the 1940s, when it was not as accepted as it is now for a woman to divorce her husband. After returning home from her dance days, Ford married a high school friend -- but he didn't pay much attention to her after they got married, and the fact that they had to move around a lot wore on her. She filed for divorce later, and then met Gerald Ford, who didn't seem fazed that he was her second husband.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I  did  not  know  that different people  got  reward money====

dgrimm60

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not know that  she  had  studied  dancing====I  did  not  know  that  she  ha  been married before===

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Didn't Know About The Grateful Dead_2

On July 9, 1995, the rock band the Grateful Dead played their last concert at Soldier's Field in Chicago. Here are 5 interesting things you didn't know about this popular group whose followers called themselves “Deadheads.”

The Band Originally Performed Under Another Name

The Grateful Dead began their career as the Warlocks, a group formed in early 1965 from the remnants of a Palo Alto, California jug band called Mother McCree's Uptown Jug Champions. The Warlocks featured Jerry Garcia, Ron “Pigpen” McKeman, Bob Weir and Bill Kreutzmann. Phil Lesh joined the group later. The band changed their name to the Grateful Dead around 1965, after which drummer, Mickey Hart, and lyricist Robert Hunter, joined.

They Used a Folklore Dictionary to Come Up With the Band’s Name

Garcia reported that nobody initially liked the name Grateful Dead for the band. They discovered it while leafing through a Funk and Wagnalls, and it just struck him as the perfect name. It turned out that it was a good choice. Garcia believed parents would not like the name and those who were just curious about a band with that name would be filtered out.

Jerry Garcia Played Amazing Guitar With Part of One Finger Missing

While vacationing at the Santa Cruz Mountains with his family at age four, Garcia had his finger against a piece of wood as his brother chopped it. Unfortunately, his brother miscalculated and cut off Garcia’s middle finger to about two-thirds of the way down. Garcia still became an amazing steel guitar player and reportedly bragged about his missing finger as a child.

The Band Only Hit the Top 10 Once

In 1987, “Touch of Grey” was released as a single and was the only record by the Grateful Dead to hit Number 9 on Billboard’s Hot 100. After 20 years as a group, they reached the Top 10 with their album “In the Dark” in 1987. Some other songs by the Grateful Dead such as “Casey Jones” or “Eyes of the World” were complete flops on Billboard but are now considered classics.

There is a Species of Cockroach Named After Jerry Garcia

In the late 1990s, a Dead-loving taxonomist discovered a new species of cockroach and named it “Cryptocercus garciai” after Jerry Garcia. In 1995, just three months after his passing, two astronomers named an asteroid after the late singer as well.

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5 Things You Didn't Know About Millard Fillmore_2

On July 10, 1850, Millard Fillmore was sworn in as president of the United States, following Zachary Taylor's death in office. Here are 5 things you never knew about this president whose own party would not nominate him as a candidate in the following election...

Fillmore Was One of the Accidental Presidents

Fillmore ascended to the presidency suddenly when Zachary Taylor became ill and was given a mercury compound by physicians that caused blisters and bleeding, leading to his death. Taylor died within days after serving merely 16 months in office, and Fillmore became the new president. John Tyler, Andrew Johnson, Chester A. Arthur and Gerald Ford are the only others who rose to the office of the presidency without ever being elected.

He Served Without a Vice President

For around 38 years during the existence of the presidency, no vice president served because there was no provision for that under the U.S. Constitution. Fillmore had no vice president, and neither did Tyler, Arthur or Johnson for the entire time they were U.S. presidents. In 1967, the 25th Amendment fixed this glaring error and allowed a president to choose their own vice president as long as members of Congress agreed.

Fillmore Personally Fought a Fire While He Was President

Both Fillmore and his wife had a love of learning, and they founded the first permanent library at the White House. Fillmore was even known to carry a dictionary around with him to work on improving his vocabulary, which is something that probably wouldn’t happen these days. In December 1851, the Library of Congress caught on fire, and he was reported to have helped to battle the blaze and later approved a bill that would pay to replace all of the books destroyed in the fire.

His Support for the Compromise of 1850 Delayed but Did Not Stop the Civil War

Tensions were high among the states about slavery during this period, so Fillmore approved the 1850 Compromise. This bill let New Mexico and Utah decide whether or not to permit slavery and added California as a non-slavery state, but it did not lower the tension between the slave and non-slave holding states. The arguments over the issue of slavery and enactment of this new legislation might have postponed a war between the states, but the Civil War finally broke out in 1861.

Fillmore Never Won an Election for President

Because Fillmore supported the controversial Compromise of 1850, his own party refused to nominate him to run for reelection in 1852 and chose Winfield Scott of New Jersey as their candidate. Fillmore was nominated by the Know-Nothing Party to run for president in 1856 but was handily beaten by James Buchanan. Fillmore only received 22 percent of the popular vote and won Maryland’s electoral votes, which wasn’t nearly enough.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I  did  not  know  how  they  got  the bands  name==== I  did  not  know  that  a asteroid  is  named  

after  JERRY  GARCIA===

dgrimm60

 

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that  he  help  put  out the fire  that burned  down the  LIBRARY OF  CONGRESS===

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Didn't Know About Big Ben_2

On July 11, 1859, Big Ben, the great bell inside the famous London clock tower, chimed for the first time. Here are 5 things you probably didn't know about Big Ben....

Big Ben Is the Name of the Bell, Not the Tower or Clock

Big Ben is thought to be named after an actual person, but it’s something of a mystery as to who this is. The major candidate is Sir Benjamin Hall, who was a huge man as well as a politician and engineer in the 19th century. After bloviating about what the bell should be named, he suggested “Big Ben” after himself, and his name is inscribed somewhere on the bell, so why not? The other Ben in the running as the namesake of the bell is Benjamin Caunt, who was a popular heavyweight boxer during that time period.

Money Makes the Time Accurate

Money may make the world go round, but it also makes the clock on Big Ben keep accurate time. Old British pennies are stacked on top of the clock’s pendulum to balance it, which makes its timekeeping more consistent and steadies its swing. By adding or taking away one of the coins, the clock’s time can be changed by 0.4 seconds each day, which might not sound like much but eventually would make everyone passing by look at their watches.

Birds Managed to Change the Time in 1949

Starlings managed to change the time on the clock in 1949 when they decided that the minute hand on the clock would make a good perch. Apparently, so many of them landed on the minute hand, their weight slowed the clock down enough that it became four and one half minutes slow. It was unexplained how management corrected the situation, but it might have had something to do with a large cat that was especially agile.

Big Ben Has Been Eerily Quiet Since 2017

Although the clock will continue displaying the time, the chimes of Big Ben have been silenced except for certain special occasions, and this is expected to continue until about 2021. This is because the entire clock tower is undergoing restoration, including the dismantling of the clock itself to clean and repair it, and a kitchen, elevator and toilet are being added. Visitors and locals can still hear Big Ben chime on New Year’s Eve and on other occasions that are special.

The Structure Was Originally Called St. Stephen’s Tower

Built in 1859, the tower that holds Big Ben was constructed following a fire in 1834, and it was named after the House of Commons meeting place, St. Stephen’s Hall. In 2012, the clock tower was renamed the Elizabeth Tower to honor the diamond jubilee of Elizabeth II.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know how the  bell  got  its  name====I  did not  know  about the  starlings that slowed 

the  clock 4 and1/2  minutes ====

dgrimm60

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phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know About The Medal of Honor

On July 12, 1862, Congress authorized the Medal of Honor to award members of the armed services who had committed acts of courage. Here are 5 things you didn't know about this prestigious medal presented in the name of the U.S. Congress.

The Youngest Winner of the Medal of Honor Was 11

Willie Johnston was a drummer boy for the Union Army, serving in the 3rd Vermont Infantry during the Civil War, along with his father. He was the youngest to be awarded the medal at age 13 after he held onto his drum during the Seven Days Battles as others dropped their weapons and fled. Johnston later worked in Baltimore as a nurse and then entered the Veteran Reserve Corps, where he was the band’s drum major.

ps:So is it 11 or 13?? (I looked it up and 13 is correct not 11)

Only One Woman Was Ever Awarded this Medal

Mary Edwards Walker was a U.S. Army surgeon who was the only woman awarded a Medal of Honor for her actions during the Civil War in treating the wounded. Crossing over Confederate lines to treat wounded civilians, she was held by the rebels as a prisoner of war until she was ultimately exchanged. The Army took away her Medal of Honor in 1917. However, it was restored after 60 years by President Jimmy Carter.

Medal of Honor Recipients Receive a Few Extra Benefits

While having a medal hung around your neck by the president is an enormous honor, other perks come with it. Those awarded a Medal of Honor can be interred at Arlington National Cemetery, and if they are enlisted, they receive an additional uniform bonus. Added to their earned military benefits, they receive more than $1,300 in additional monies each month as well as a 10 percent increase in their retirement pay.

Only One Coast Guard Member Has Received the Medal of Honor

The Coast Guard transported Marines to battle during World War II, although they patrol the shores of America today. The only member of the Coast Guard to be awarded a Medal of Honor was Douglas Munro, a Signalman 1st Class, who exhibited extreme heroism during the Battle of Guadalcanal. By using his boat to shield others from the Japanese at the beach, he saved many Marines but was shot and killed, receiving the medal posthumously.

President Teddy Roosevelt Was Awarded the Medal of Honor

Roosevelt is the only U.S. president to be awarded the Medal of Honor, and it stems from his actions during the Spanish-American War. At the time the war broke out, Roosevelt was serving as the Assistant Secretary of the Navy. In 1916, he was passed over by the nominating committee and finally received his Medal of Honor in 2001 from President Bill Clinton.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did not  know about the  youngest  person  was  a  13 year  old during  the  CIVIL WAR===

I did  not  know  that their  has  only  been 1 women that  received the medal===

dgrimm60

 

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5 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Billy the Kid_2

On July 14, 1881, Billy the Kid was shot to death in New Mexico by Sheriff Pat Garrett in an ambush. At the time, Billy had a $500 bounty on his head. Think you know Billy the Kid? Here are five of the most interesting facts about the young outlaw...

He May Have Spoken Irish, and He May Also Have Become Fluent in Spanish

Billy the Kid was born in New York to immigrant Irish parents, and in 2016, one of the historians who studied the Kid's life found evidence that the Kid may have spoken enough Irish to act as a translator for other Irish immigrants. In the 1800s, many Irish immigrants to the U.S. did not speak English, and the Kid may have put that skill to use, helping those who couldn't speak English adjust to living in their new country. There is also evidence that the Kid learned to speak Spanish fluently after moving to New Mexico territory. In fact, the most popular telling of the Kid's death has him calling out "Who's that?" in Spanish when Sheriff Pat Garrett arrived at the place where the Kid was hiding out.

No One Really Knows His True Name

The nickname "Billy the Kid" was derived from the name William H. Bonney (sometimes written as William H. Bonney, Jr.), an alias that he started using in 1877. However, no one really knows what his birth name was. Current theories hold that he was named Henry McCarty or William Henry McCarty, and that at one point he went by Henry Antrim.

The Sheriff Who Supposedly Shot Him Also Created His Legendary Persona

The current story of the Kid's death has Sheriff Pat Garrett shooting the Kid in Fort Sumner in New Mexico territory. At that point, Billy was already famous and infamous, but his status as a real Old West legend didn't start until after his death when Garrett wrote a biography of the Kid. The book created a sensationalized persona that captivated readers. As the decades went by, Billy the Kid's public image became the subject of countless books and movies.

The Kid's Case Came up for Review for a Possible Pardon in 2010

Toward the end of former New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson's last term in office in 2010, he took another look at a pardon that had been proposed for Billy the Kid back in the 1800s. The pardon was part of a deal between a former governor and the Kid: a pardon in exchange for testifying for the state. Unfortunately, even though Billy the Kid kept his part of the deal, he was never pardoned. Richardson was not the first 21st-century lawmaker to look at granting the pardon, and in each case, descendants of both the Kid's family and Garrett, as well as descendants of others murdered by Billy the Kid, gave passionate testimony regarding pardoning or not pardoning. In the end, Richardson declined to pardon the Kid in 2011.

He Managed to Escape Captivity Just Before He Was Scheduled to Be Hung

The Kid's death was not the first time Garrett had dealt with Billy. In 1880, Garrett managed to capture Billy and had him convicted of killing another sheriff. The Kid was sentenced to hang, but in 1881, he managed to slip away, get out of his handcuffs, steal a gun, and shoot a guard. He then shot a second guard, gathered weapons, cut off his leg shackles, stole a horse and fled. Garrett found him again and shot him a few months later.

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PHKRAUSE

I  did  not  know  that  the  Governor  of NEW MEXICO  was  thinking  about giving

BILLY THE  KID  a pardon=====

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Didn't Know About Giovanni Versace

On this day in 1997 the Italian fashion designer Giovanni Versace was shot and killed outside his Miami Beach mansion by Andrew Cunanan.  Here are five things you didn't know about Versace...

Gianni Versace's Death Was One of Several in a Killing Spree

Andrew Cunanan, the man who killed Gianni Versace, had already killed a few people and was wanted by the FBI. In fact, a worker recognized Cunanan when he made it to Florida, and that worker tried to contact the FBI, but agents were unable to reach the area until after Cunanan had left. Versace's death boosted the search simply because of how high profile Versace was.

The Motive Behind Gianni Versace's Murder Is Still Unknown

Even now, no one knows why Cunanan shot Gianni Versace. Theories have ranged from Cunanan trying to kill gay men in general to odd revenge theories. It's generally accepted that Versace and Cunanan did not know each other. Cunanan left no note before he killed himself, and there appeared to be no obvious reason why he was even at Versace's home. While some of the people murdered by Cunanan appeared to be old acquaintances or people unlucky enough to have vehicles that Cunanan wanted as getaway cars, Versace's death stands out as inexplicable.

We Wouldn't Have Supermodels if It Hadn't Been for Versace

Gianni Versace's death shocked a vast swathe of the public. The Versace fashion house's influence on the world of fashion can't be overstated. Versace was the first brand to really promote specific models and present them as living this glamorous life; without Versace's influence, the "supermodel" would not exist, and several famous names likely wouldn't be as famous, even if they had still been successful as models.

The Versace Family Inspired Google's Image Search Function

Google created its image search engine in response to the brouhaha surrounding the infamous dress that Jennifer Lopez wore to the 2000 Grammys. This was the diaphanous green dress with the neckline that more than plunged (and oddly, it turned out that the dress was a mistake; Lopez was supposed to receive a different dress). The fashion house that sent that dress? Versace. Had they not sent the wrong dress, or had Lopez declined to wear it, Google could have looked very different in the years after those Grammys.

Fifty Percent of the Versace Fashion House Went to Donatella Versace's Daughter

After Gianni Versace died, his sister Donatella took over the fashion house. But her leadership was actually a temporary measure. Gianni had left much of the house to Donatella's daughter, and Donatella led the house simply because, at the time, her daughter was only 11 years old. 

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  about he  gave  his  fashion house to his  sister daughter

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Probably Didn't Know About JFK Jr._2

On July 16, 1999, John F. Kennedy, Jr.; his wife, Carolyn Bessette Kennedy; and her sister, Lauren Bessette, died when the single-engine plane that Kennedy was piloting plunged into the Atlantic Ocean near Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts. Here are five things you didn't know about JFK Jr.

JFK Jr. Had Not Qualified to Fly With Instruments Only.

The conditions in which JFK Jr. had to fly that night would have required having to navigate by instrument only and no visual help. However, he had not been qualified -- meaning he hadn't taken the qualification test -- to fly with instruments only. This could have contributed to his plane crash.

He Was Flying a Relatively Unfamiliar Plane on Little Sleep With a Potentially Compromised Ankle

The disappearance of a plane can seem mysterious and nearly mythical, but in JFK Jr.'s case, his plane may have disappeared because of very mundane causes. First, he wasn't used to flying the type of plane he was in. He'd had some practice, but not a lot, so the plane was still somewhat unfamiliar. There were also indications that he got very little sleep the night before. His ankle was also recovering from an injury and had just been released from a cast. All of those put together make for a questionable flight in hazy darkness.

He Had a Chance to Become an Actor in College

While JFK Jr. was known for his publishing and legal work, he was also known for his acting skill, which he honed in college. It turns out that he was very interested in becoming an actor and may have had the opportunity to be in a film. However, his mother, Jackie Kennedy, did not approve of the choice and persuaded him to go to law school instead.

He Once Wanted to Rappel Down Mt. Rushmore

In 1999, JFK Jr. was under a lot of stress, partly from his magazine's financial troubles. His way of coping with this type of stress tended toward physical risk-taking that sometimes bordered on the ridiculous. Case in point, his reaction to the magazine's potential problems was to ask park rangers if he could rappel down Mount Rushmore. The rangers declined his request.

He Was Also Known for Playing "Chicken" in a Kayak Against the Staten Island Ferry

One hopes this is just an exaggeration by a friend, but one of JFK Jr.'s biographers did make a statement to ABC News that JFK Jr. had some rather alarming yet amazing risk-taking habits. The biographer mentioned that JFK Jr. would take a kayak out and somehow play chicken against the Staten Island Ferry. He was also prone to swimming so far out at the beach that his friends would lose sight of him and get ready to call emergency services. Luckily he would always show up, unharmed.

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5 Fun Facts You Didn't Know About Disneyland_2

On July 17, 1955, Disneyland opened in Anaheim, California. It's estimated that just under 45,000 people make their way to Disney's land of enchantment every single day! That's not the only fun fact we know about Disneyland—here are five more interesting tidbits you probably didn't know...

Human Skeletons Were Used for One Attraction

Disneyland borrowed human remains from UCLA to display in the Pirates of the Caribbean ride when it first opened in 1967 a few months after Disney himself died. Because the Imagineers in charge of the ride thought the fake bones originally used weren’t real looking, they borrowed some real props. Eventually the replacement props were replaced with fakes that looked more realistic, and the borrowed bones were returned to their native countries and buried properly.

Lots of Cats Wander the Park at Night

While Disneyland is the home of Mickey Mouse, his real counterparts are not encouraged to scamper around the amusement park, so more than 200 feral cats roam around the park after closing. Occasionally, the company has the cats neutered and spayed. Kittens are taken to no-kill shelters, which helps keep the population of felines under control.

A Light Is Always Left on in the Window Above the Fire Station

Up on the second floor at the Fire Department on Main Street is a secret apartment that was built for Walt Disney himself. It isn’t large but has a small patio, bath with shower and even a kitchen where Disney and his wife, Lillian, could enjoy watching the crowd. A light is left turned on in the apartment’s front window, which is in tribute to the founder of America’s favorite amusement playground.

Sleeping Beauty’s Castle Has a Time Capsule

In 1995, as part of the celebration of Disneyland’s 40th Anniversary, a time capsule was buried that contains newspapers, photos, messages, memorabilia and an Indiana Jones decoder card. The time capsule was buried near the castle and will be opened on July 17, 2035, which will be the 80th anniversary of Disneyland. Several other time capsules were buried in 2012 at California Adventure Park and another under Buena Vista Plaza.

The Haunted Mansion Has a Real Bullet Hole in the Wall

Many people don’t know there is a real bullet hole in the wall of the ballroom at the Haunted Mansion, as if it needed anything else to be scary. According to accounts, a guest brought in a concealed gun in 1974 and fired off several shots as though he was in the O.K. Corral, but no one was injured. One bullet went through the wall in the bathroom, another hit a snowflake on the Adventure Thru Inner Space ride and another bullet hole was found at the diorama for Primeval World.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I  did  not  know  htat he was  thinking  about  becoming  an  actor====

dgrimm60

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that he  and  his  wife  had  and  little  APT  ovet the  fire house and that  a  light

is kept as  a tribute to him

dgrimm60

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5 Things To Know About The Chappaquiddick Scandal

On July 18, 1969, a car driven by Sen. Ted Kennedy, D-Mass., plunged off a bridge on Chappaquiddick Island near Martha's Vineyard. Here are 5 surprising  things you didn't know about the tragedy which left one woman dead...

Kopechne Decided to Head to Chappaquiddick at the Last Minute

Mary Jo Kopechne’s cousin, 78-year-old Georgetta Potoski, said the young woman wasn’t supposed to go to Chappaquiddick for the weekend because of a previous New Orleans work obligation. The get-together at Chappaquiddick was being held as a reunion for campaign workers who had been involved in the presidential run of Robert F. Kennedy. However, Kopechne wanted to see friends there that she had worked with on Robert Kennedy’s campaign, so she changed her plans about going to New Orleans.

Kopechne Was One of the Girls in the Boiler Room

The boiler room girls, as they were called, all worked on the presidential campaign of Robert Kennedy and were accomplished women whose job was gathering information from different areas of the country and researching the delegates to the convention. Kopechne was present at the Ambassador Hotel the night that Robert Kennedy was killed, and she was on the funeral train that transported his body to Arlington National Cemetery.

It Was Hours Before the Accident Was Reported

Senator Kennedy had reportedly left shortly after 11 p.m. with Kopechne, 28, in his Olds Delmont 88. The car went from a paved to dirt road, crashed through a guardrail and ended up on its roof under water, however, Kennedy got out and reported that he had made repeated dives to locate Kopechne but did not succeed. He did not notify the police in Edgartown of the incident until 9:45 a.m., which was around 10 hours after the accident occurred.

Kennedy’s Sentence Was Suspended

Kennedy was never charged with the death of the young woman but pleaded guilty to leaving the accident scene. The judge, James Boyle, sentenced the Senator to two months, which was the minimum, but suspended that sentence. In a statement by the judge, he said that Kennedy had been and would continue to suffer punishment and that justice had been satisfied.

It Probably Influenced Kennedy’s Decision to Not Run for President

Kennedy asked his constituents if he should resign from the Senate following the incident at Chappaquiddick, but he was encouraged to continue. Kennedy did run for president during the 1980 election, but lost in the primary to Jimmy Carter, who was the incumbent, by a substantial margin. Carter subsequently lost the presidential election to Ronald Reagan.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

 I did not  know that she was on the traian that transported ROBERT KENNEDEY body ====

dgrimm60

 

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phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know About The Rosetta Stone_2

On July 19, 1799, the Rosetta Stone was found, which contained a pharaoh's public proclamation written in several languages. Find out some of the things you probably didn’t know about this mysterious tablet that helped expand research into ancient Egypt...

The Rosetta Stone Helped Scholars Interpret Egyptian Hieroglyphics

A manner of picture writing known as hieroglyphics was used in ancient Egypt , however, until the discovery of what was dubbed the Rosetta Stone, scholars could not read this type of writing. After the discovery, it was possible to decipher the ancient writings left behind by ancient Egyptians and learn about their history and lives. The Rosetta Stone is considered one of the most important archaeological discoveries in the world and is displayed at the British Museum.

The Tablet Was Named After an Egyptian City

It is thought that a temple was the original home of the Rosetta Stone, but it was moved sometime during the Middle Ages and ended up as a piece of building material when Fort Julien was built on the Nile River’s west bank by the Ottoman Empire. In 1798, Egypt was invaded by Napoleon and his French troops, and it was in 1799 that the stone was discovered by some of Napoleon’s soldiers. The new fort was only a short distance from a port city called Rosetta and was named after the town.

None of the Texts Were Complete

Deciphering the Rosetta Stone was challenging because it was a fragment broken off of the entire stone, and the hieroglyphs in Egyptian were in very poor condition. Scientists who have studied the Rosetta Stone believe that 14 or 15 lines of writing are missing and that the it should have featured a winged disc at the top. However, it contains three bands of tightly written text in hieroglyphic demotic, which was language used normally by the people, and Greek. By comparing the Greek inscriptions to the others, scientists were able to decipher the hieroglyphs.

The Rosetta Stone Dates Back to 196 BC

Ptolemy V Epiphanes was the ruler in Egypt when the Rosetta Stone was made, and served as the Ptolemaic dynasty’s fifth ruler. He was only five years old when he became pharaoh of Egypt in 204 BC and ruled until 181 BC. At the time the Rosetta Stone was erected, the pharaoh was 14 years old, and the stone lists some of the good deeds he had done for the Egyptian people and priests such as the repeal of certain taxes.

Hieroglyphs Were Last Used About 396 AD

Once Theodosius I, the Roman emperor, closed the non-Christian temples around 391 AD, the use of hieroglyphic writing declined, with the last inscription appearing back in 396 AD. Because this type of writing had been in disuse for more than 1,000 years, it was challenging for scientists to unravel whether they were letters of a language that was spoken or merely symbols or even what direction they were read in such as left to right or right to left.

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