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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did not  know  that  RHODE ISLAND ===plus  local cities and  counties in KANSAS==INDIANA ==CONNECTICUT

celebrated V-J DAY

dgrimm60

 

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did not  know that  RHODE ISLAND and local  cities and  counties in KANSAS===INDIANA==CONNECICUT

celebrated V-J DAY 

dgrimm60

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phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know About The Panama Canal_2

On August 15, 1914, after years of construction, the Panama Canal was opened to maritime traffic. Here are 5 things you didn’t know about this artificial waterway that sped up travel between the two major oceans...

Initial Permissions for the Canal Were Given to a French Company

When Colombia, which at that time controlled what is now Panama, decided that building a canal across the Panamanian isthmus was a good idea, it received proposals from a number of companies. The first company to be awarded the right to build the canal was the French builder Ferdinand de Lesseps, who had built the very successful Suez Canal years earlier. de Lesseps' plans did not translate well to Central America, however, and to the terrain across this tiny piece of land. His project hit so many stumbling blocks, including disease that killed many workers, that his company declared bankruptcy and was eventually bought out by an engineer named Philippe-Jean Bunau-Varilla, who had worked on de Lesseps' project.

Those Initial French Canal Plans Called for No Locks

One of the problems that de Lesseps faced was that he had assumed he could use the same construction methods and plans as he had on the Suez Canal. However, the Suez Canal crossed a relatively flat piece of land and required no locks, which are those compartments that fill with water and elevate a ship over higher terrain in a canal. In Panama, the distance to dig across the isthmus might not have been a lot, but it was rougher, elevated terrain. The amount of land that de Lesseps would have had to dig out was astounding and, ultimately, impossible.

The U.S. Almost Built a Canal in Nicaragua

Philippe-Jean Bunau-Varilla wanted the U.S. to buy assets of the canal but hit a bizarre block: The U.S. wanted a canal in Nicaragua instead. Bunau-Varilla managed to convince the U.S. government that Panama was a better choice because Nicaragua had too many volcanoes near the proposed canal route. 

The Rush to Put the Canal in American Hands Led to Panama's Independence From Colombia

The U.S. wanted control of the canal zone even though a French company was working on the actual construction. While the U.S. and Bunau-Varilla might have been in agreement over this, Colombia was not, and it prevented the agreement that would have let the U.S. handle canal construction in Panama. Obviously, the U.S. didn't like that, so it decided to back rebels who eventually got Panama to break away from Colombia. After Panama became independent, its provisional government allowed the U.S. to take over canal construction. Fun fact: The Panamanian representative was, of all people, Bunau-Varilla. 

The Canal Had to Be Expanded in the Late 2000s -- and It May Still Be Too Small for Some Newer Ships

The Panama Canal is considered a modern marvel, but its age is definitely showing. In the century-plus since the canal's construction, ships have increased in size by a tremendous amount. In 2007, work began on the canal to widen it so it could accommodate ships known as post-Panamax ships. Panamax refers to a class of ship that was built specifically to fit in the canal, and the canal now needs to fit larger and larger vessels. The new construction should allow it to let through ships that are nearly three times the size of Panamax ships, but it still won't be big enough to allow the world's largest ships, such as the Triple E container ships from Maersk.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that the U.S.  helped  Panama gain its  independence   from  Colombia

dgrimm60

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5 Shocking Things You Didn't Know About Elvis Presley

On August 16, 1977, Elvis Presley died of a heart attack. Elvis Presley, just 42 years old, was found unconscious on the bathroom floor of his Memphis mansion, Graceland.  Here are five shocking facts you probably didn't know about Elvis Presley...

Fifteen of the Songs Elvis Recorded Contained the Word “Blue”

“Blue Suede Shoes,” “Blue Hawaii” and “Blue Christmas” are probably the best well-known of Elvis’s blue songs, but there were 12 others, and no one seems to know why he was attracted to songs that contained this word. Other songs that Elvis recorded containing the word “blue” are “Milkcow Blues Boogie,” “G.I. Blues” and “Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain.” One interesting thing about the King of Rock and Roll is that he never wrote any of the songs he recorded.

Elvis Never Saw Priscilla Without Makeup

In an interview with Priscilla Presley, she stated that her husband never saw her without makeup because mystique was important to him. She said he only wanted to see her made up and dressed. Reportedly, Presley went so far as to control what clothing his wife wore and would shop with her, and she wore at least a little makeup all the time.

Presley Was a Germophobe

The King of Rock and Roll, according to his wife, was a germaphobe and went out of his way to ensure he was safe from germs wherever he went. When he dined at the homes of other people, he went so far as to bring along his own silverware. In addition, when handed a drink, he would turn it around and drink from a cup next to the handle because he thought no one else ever did that.

He Once Made a Midnight Run for Sandwiches

Presley was well-known for his love of peanut butter and traveled on his jet one day in 1976 all the way from Graceland to Denver for a special sandwich sold by a local restaurant there. The sandwich consisted of a loaf of bread that was hollowed out and packed with a whole jar of peanut butter, the entire contents of a jelly jar and a package of bacon. This giant sandwich cost $50. 

Presley Underwent Several Plastic Surgeries

Although it isn’t unusual for celebrities to have plastic surgery, Presley really had little done over the years. In 1956, he had his nose somewhat minimized by Hollywood plastic surgeon Dr. Maury Parks. In addition, he had a nose job while he was a soldier in the U.S. Army and a slight amount of work during the 1960s, according to Joe Esposito, who was the star’s friend and road manager.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

 I  did  not  know  that  he did  not  every  see  his  wife  with  out  make-up====

dgrimm60

 

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5 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Billy the Kid_3

On August 17, 1877, the legendary Billy the Kid, whose real name was Henry McCarty, killed his first man, an Arizona blacksmith named Frank Cahill. Think you know Billy the Kid? Here are five of the most interesting facts about the young outlaw who died at age 21...

The Kid’s First Theft Involved Clothing

Billy the Kid may have had a reputation as a killer back in the Old West, but he first got into trouble in 1875 under his real name of Henry McCarty when he and another guy called “Sombrero Jack” stole some clothing from a laundry. Although he was arrested after being turned in to the sheriff by his landlord, he scrambled up a chimney to escape and began his short life of crime. The same year he killed an Arizona blacksmith in a saloon dispute and changed his name to William H. Bonney but soon picked up the nickname “Billy the Kid.”

No, He Wasn’t Left-Handed

For many years, people thought that Billy the Kid was left-handed because of a photograph that showed his gun holster strapped on his left side. However, because the photo was made around 1880, there was a technical error, and it was flipped when it was printed. Now it is thought that he was either right-handed or ambidextrous.

His Reputation as a Gunslinger Developed During the Lincoln County War

The Kid participated in the Lincoln County War in New Mexico in 1878 when he was hired by John Tunstall, a rancher, to provide protection for his property against two Irish tycoons that held a monopoly over cattle trading and dry goods in the area. After Tunstall was murdered on the orders of the local sheriff, the Kid and other ranch hands formed a group called “The Regulators,” who acted as vigilantes seeking revenge for the murder of their employer. Killing the sheriff led to a firefight in Lincoln that lasted for five days, where the Kid earned his reputation as a gunslinger.

A Wanted Poster Was Never Issued for Billy the Kid

Replicas of a “Wanted” poster for the capture of Billy the Kid are common but are all fakes. No wanted poster was ever issued for the Kid. However, the governor of the New Mexico Territory, Lew Wallace, did post an ad in the Las Vegas Gazette offering $500 reward for anyone who could capture William Bonny, and the name was even misspelled.

Billy’s Reputation Might Have Been Exaggerated

Billy the Kid might have killed nine people, and five of those deaths happened while he was a Regulator during the Lincoln County Wars. Even that high a number is questionable since evidence only exists that he was personally responsible for the deaths of four people, including two prison guards. While he participated in the killing of five others, there is no proof that he was the one who pulled the trigger.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

 I  did  not  know  that there  were  no  WANTED POSTERS   for  BILLY THE KID

dgrimm60

 

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5 Things You Didn't Know About Woodstock

On August 18, 1969, the Woodstock Music Festival, which was attended by more than 400,000 people over the three-day event, concluded. Here are 5 things you never knew about the event that ended up as the music festival to end all festivals...

The Woodstock Music Festival Was Originally Supposed to Make a Profit

Tickets to Woodstock cost $6 for the day and $8 if festival-goers bought tickets at the gate, and to attend the event for all three days cost $24 at the gate or $18 ahead of time. However, the festival drew a much larger crowd than was expected. Festival-goers tore down the fence to get in and many attended free of charge since it was impossible to corral the massive crowd.

Two Scheduled Bands Never Made it There

Two scheduled bands were absent from the festival, and promoters weren’t exactly complimentary in a message sent to one of the groups. The Jeff Beck Group managed to break up as a band a short time before the festival, so they didn’t appear. The other group was the popular Iron Butterfly, who demanded a helicopter ride after getting stuck in New York at LaGuardia Airport, but instead of a ride, they received a rather unflattering telegram from the promoters instead, which would be inappropriate to post here.

No Violence Was Reported During the Festival

Despite the enormous crowd that attended the Woodstock festival, the only act of violence happened when activist Abbie Hoffman jumped up on the stage while The Who were taking a break in their set. He grabbed the mic and started talking about how John Sinclair, a White Panthers member who was in prison, should be freed. Pete Townshend, guitarist with The Who, yelled that Hoffman should leave the stage and hit him with his guitar neck in the head to encourage him to move along.

The Beatles Turned Down an Invitation to Appear

Some music groups turned down invitations to appear, including John Lennon, who said he would be unable to assemble his band members together for the event. Although he offered to come with the Plastic Ono Band, the promoters of the event weren’t interested. Other groups that had no interest in participating included The Doors, Led Zeppelin, Jethro Tull, The Byrds and Bob Dylan, all of whom were probably sorry they refused.

The Man Whose Property Was Used for the Festival Was Honored by Rolling Stone

Max Yasgur, the owner of the land where the festival was held, was the subject of a lawsuit by neighbors for damage to their properties. Damage to his property was much worse, and he was awarded a settlement of $50,000. He sold the farm several years later and died in 1973, after which Rolling Stone placed a full-page obituary in tribute to Yasgur, even though he was not a musician.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did not  know that there  was  no violence at the  WOODSTOCK FESTIAL  =====

dgrimm60

 

 

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5 Things You Didn't Know about Old Ironsides_2

On August 19, 1812, Old Ironsides, the nickname for the USS Constitution, earned its name during the War of 1812. Here are 5 things you didn’t know about this famous warship now known as America’s Ship of State...

It Is the Navy’s Oldest Warship

The USS Constitution was the first of six frigates built for the U.S. Navy and armed with 44 guns. Captain Samuel Nicholson took her to the Caribbean on her first voyage to participate in a quasi-war with France, where the captain and crew captured the Niger, a French ship, off the coast of Charleston. During the next two years, the ship patrolled the West Indies. In 1801, she returned to her homeport of Boston.

The Nickname Wasn’t Because the Ship Was Made of Iron

“Old Ironsides” didn’t get its name because it was constructed of iron. It was during the War of 1812 that it received the name because it was so well-built with its triple layer of oak and dense pine that cannonballs shot at it bounced off. The battle in question occurred after the commander of the ship, Captain Isaac Hull, ordered an attack on a British frigate, the Guerriere, which sustained heavy damage.

Paul Revere Contributed to the Construction of the Ship

Paul Revere, the man famous for his midnight ride to warn the colonists that the British were coming, was an engraver and silversmith. He made the fastenings and copper bolts used in the Constitution. This helped make the ship faster and stronger than other comparable warships during this period.

The Launch of the Ship Was Delayed for an Unusual Reason

The ship was built in Boston, Massachusetts, at the Edmund Hartt shipyard and was originally scheduled for launch September 20, 1797. A crowd gathered to watch, but the frigate only went down the launching deck about 27 feet before getting stuck. It took a month for builders to reconstruct the ground ways to finally launch the Constitution on October 21 into Boston Harbor.

Old Ironsides Never Lost a Battle

The USS Constitution won 42 battles during her service with the U.S. Navy. During the War of 1812, she defeated five warships commanded by the British, consisting of the HMS Guerriere, Cyane, Java, Levant and Pictou, as well as a number of merchant ships. Following the war, she was sailed to the Mediterranean to capture slave ships off the African coast.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did not  know that it  never  lost  a  battle ====I  did  not  know that  PAUL REVERE help build the ship===

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Voyager 2_2

On August 20th, 1977, the United States launched Voyager 2, an unmanned spacecraft carrying a phonograph record containing greetings in dozens of languages, samples of music and sounds of nature.  See how much you know about this historic event with these 5 facts about NASA's Voyager mission...

Voyager 2 Accomplished a Number of Firsts for Mankind

Voyager 2 made it close to Uranus early 1986 and sent back thousands of images of the atmosphere, moons and rings to the Deep Space Network. In addition to photographing the largest moons orbiting around the planet, it also detected ten moons that had never been seen before, as well as two additional rings that hadn’t been discovered.  A few of the things it discovered are that the temperature on Uranus is around -350 degrees Fahrenheit and that its rate of rotation is much shorter that of Earth’s at 17 hours, 14 minutes.

Voyager 2's Computer Systems Knocked Out During Launch

While there was no problem with the liftoff, Voyager 2’s computer went crazy because of the shaking, twisting motion of the rocket. It reacted by switching into backup mode, and it turned things off and would not communicate with its handlers on Earth. The coder who programmed the computer system managed to reestablish contact and patch the software before the launch of Voyager 1.

It Carries a Time Capsule on a Golden Disc

A 12-inch copper disk with gold plating is carried by both Voyager 1 and 2; the disk portrays a selection of Earth’s culture and life. Chairman Carl Sagan chaired a committee that chose music, greetings in 55 languages, 115 images and natural sounds to convey to any being in the universe what life is like here. The photos are a wide-ranging selection from illustrations of physical human anatomy, from World Book to the Taj Mahal and dolphins.

The Mission of Voyager 2 Was Supposed to Last Five Years

The original mission of the space probe was to study Saturn and Jupiter; however, NASA engineering and craftsmanship was so amazing that it was possible to continue Voyager 2’s exploration. NASA scientists reprogrammed the space probe remotely to send it on a course that would take it further in the solar system to study Neptune and Uranus. Instead of lasting five years, the program was extended to 12, and the probe has now been in operation for more than four decades.

It Took 41 Years for Voyager II to Leave the Solar System

The solar system is much larger than most people can imagine, and so far, the distance that Voyager 2 has traveled is around 11 billion miles. It is traveling at a speed of about 34,000 mph. It has been estimated that Voyager 2 will not approach other stars in the vastness we call outer space for another 40,000 years.

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5 Things to Know About The Lincoln-Douglas Debates

On August 21, 1858, the Lincoln-Douglas debates began in the state of Illinois, where the two Senate candidates would meet a total of seven times to speak to the voters. To mark this landmark event in U.S. political history, here are 5 things you didn't know about the Lincoln-Douglas debates...

They Were More Like Speeches Instead of Debates

Although those watching the Lincoln-Douglas “debates” were allowed to ask questions after the initial statements made by the politicians, these meetings were far from what people would consider a debate. The two men agreed that one would speak for an hour, the second man would have 1.5 hours to rebut the statement, and then another half hour would be used by the first man to answer the rebuttal. No moderator asked questions, and no fast responses were expected as they are in political debates in modern times.

Both Speakers Resorted to Insults and Racial Slurs

Debates held in this period of history were founded on stump speeches, which often contained insults and jokes, and some of the things said by Lincoln and Douglas would be offensive to today’s television audiences. Stephen Douglas commonly used race-baiting in his speeches, used the N-word and referred to Lincoln’s party as “black Republicans.” Lincoln normally didn’t use such language but spoke the N-word twice during the men’s first debate in the original transcripts, which were removed later.

Douglas Held the Upper Hand Going Into the Debates

Stephen Douglas was a powerful senator, and Lincoln, who had been nominated for an Illinois seat in the senate in 1858, realized that it would be difficult to challenge him. Instead, Lincoln suggested the debates as a way of getting his message across. In addition, the powerful Senator Douglas traveled around Illinois in his own personal railroad car, while Lincoln rode with other passengers in the train, which might have made him more appealing to voters.

The Debates Weren’t About the Presidential Election

Many people believe the debates held between Lincoln and Douglas had to do with the presidential election. However, the election was for a seat in the U.S. Senate that Stephen Douglas already held. Lincoln’s stature among voters was elevated by the debates because they were widely reported nationwide by journalists. It is unknown whether Lincoln had considered a run for the presidency at this time, but he began thinking about it seriously in 1860 following his Cooper Union speech.

Lincoln Was the Loser

People often assume that Lincoln won the debates with Douglas, and this is one of the reasons he was elected president; however, this is not true. The big audiences listening to the Lincoln-Douglas debates weren’t even voting because the elections for U.S. Senators at that time were handled through the state legislatures. Voters at that time were choosing the candidates who would represent them in the Illinois statehouse, which in turn would select the Illinois representative for the U.S. Senate.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did not  know  that the  LINCOLN  had to  travel  by  train with the passengers , while  SENATOR DOUGLAS

travel in  his  own personal train car===

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Didn't Know About Dolley Madison

On this day in 1814, first lady Dolley Madison saved a portrait of George Washington from being looted by British troops during the war of 1812. Here are five things you didn't know about Dolley Madison...

The Painting Was Likely a Copy, and No One Knows Where the Original Really Is.

The portrait is officially called the Landsdowne portrait, and it turns out that there was not only an original, but also several copies. This was before printers and copiers, so those "copies" were real paintings, but they still weren't the original portrait. Officials do not know for sure if the portrait saved at the White House was the original or one of the copies, and no one seems to be able to agree. Even the artist wouldn't say whether the White House's copy was really a copy. Regardless of the originality of the painting, Dolley Madison's choice to save it was symbolic; she did not want British troops to ruin it. Given that British troops later ransacked and burned the White House, she was likely right that they would have desecrated the portrait.

Dolley Madison's Behavior and Attitude Were Among the Few Morale-Boosting Influences in the Government.

While Dolley Madison had originally not wanted to be that involved in politics, and she had also been raised in a pacifist religion, she quickly became a force in the White House and openly supported fighting when necessary. In addition to her forthright support of defending the country, she was also a social whirlwind, holding gatherings meant to unify different political foes and visiting the families of members of Congress. Her goal was to get everyone as unified as possible, given the looming British threat.

Most of the Actual Work Involved in Saving the Portrait Was Done by a Slave.

Dolley Madison decided to save the portrait, and she did give the order to do so. But the actual saving work was done mainly by a young slave named Paul Jennings. Jennings had to break open the wooden frame surrounding the portrait because the whole painting was nailed to the wall, and he had to cut out the painting as well. Jennings then gave the painting to two friends of the Madisons, and he fled the White House. In 1865, Jennings published a memoir in which he described his escape on that terrifying night.

The Ransacking and Burning of the White House Was a Consequence of Poor Financial Planning by Congress, Plus an Ill-Timed Favor.

Years of budget cuts and budget refusals by Congress had constrained the military's ability to train troops and to grow to a healthy size. Combined with the lack of support from traditional allies the French, who were battling the British on their own across the Atlantic, that left a very meager military that found victory only in specific circumstances, namely when the targets were small or alone, such as a lone ship at sea. When the British landed 35 miles from the White House, the troops fighting them there were very ill-prepared and led by a man whose sole reason for being promoted to a leadership position was that he was the nephew of the governor of Maryland. The lack of good military strategy led to the British reaching the White House five days later.

She Actually Tried to Throw a Dinner Party While Staring Down an Invasion.

Dolley Madison's attempts to keep up the spirits of everyone in Washington were usually appreciated, but she did go a little far just before the invasion: Five days after the British landed and proceeded to steamroll over some incompetent and unprepared troops, Dolley Madison decided to throw a dinner party. It was really meant to be an act of bravery, but no one showed up of course; in fact, much of Washington was evacuating. That very evening, she found herself quickly evacuating the White House along with friends, family, and staff.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did not  know  that  DOLLY MADISON had  a  part in saving  the  painting  of  GEORGE WASHIGTON===

I  did  not know  that  DOLLY MADISON  was planning  a large dinner  party==5 days  before the  WHITE HOUSE

wa  looted  and  burned

 

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Probably Didn't Know About the War of 1812_3

On August 24, 1814, during the War of 1812, British troops entered Washington, D.C. and burned the White House.  Here are five fascinating facts you probably didn't know about the War of 1812...

The War of 1812 Went on for 32 Months

Calling it the War of 1812 can be confusing since it went on for 32 months after the United States declared war on Great Britain in 1812.  The War of 1812 lasted longer than the Spanish-American War and theMexican-American-War. It even lasted longer than America’s involvement in World War I.

The Biggest Battle Occurred After the Peace Treaty Was Signed

The largest battle of the war, and one where the United States was victorious, occurred at the Battle of New Orleans in January 1815. This was several weeks following the signing of the peace treaty at Ghent, Belgium, by British and U.S. envoys. Despite the signing of the peace treaty, the war wasn’t officially over until President James Madison and the Senate ratified the peace treaty on February 16, 1815.

Francis Scott Key Literally Described What He Saw

When Francis Scott Key wrote the poem that became “The Star-Spangled Banner” while at Fort McHenry, he mentioned “bombs bursting in air” and “the rocket’s red glare,” which wasn’t exactly poetic license. The bombs Key saw were cannonballs that weighed 200 pounds and exploded over their target. The British missiles were Congreves that resembled bottle rockets, so they appeared to observers as long sticks that spun in the air affixed to a cylindrical-shaped canister.

Canadians Celebrate the War of 1812

During the War of 1812, America actually decided to invade and occupy Canada, believing that the Canadians would welcome them with open arms, but the opposite was true. American troops were met with heavy resistance by the British loyalists who had retreated to Canada after the American Revolution, French-Canadians and Native Americans. Although Americans do not celebrate the War of 1812, Canadians do.

New Englanders Thought About Seceding During the War

It was during the War of 1812 that the subjects of secession, states’ rights and nullification were voiced, but it was by those who lived in New England. New England residents were opposed to the war from the beginning and suffered greatly from the naval blockades set up by the British. During the last weeks of 1814, New England delegates met to discuss the possibility of secession, which was ultimately dismissed, however, they continued to support nullification and states’ rights.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that the WAR OF  1812  lasted  longer  than the  MEXICAN WAR===the  SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR=

 our  involvement in WW I=====

dgrimm60

 

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5 Things You Didn't Know About Edward Kennedy

On August 25, 2009, Edward “Ted” Kennedy, the youngest brother of President John F. Kennedy and senator from Massachusetts died at age 77 from brain cancer. Here are 5 things you didn’t know about the U.S. Senator nicknamed the "Lion of the Senate”... 

Kennedy Almost Died in a Plane Crash

A few months after the assassination of his brother, President John F. Kennedy, in Dallas, Texas, the younger Kennedy was traveling to Massachusetts from Washington to attend the Democratic convention during his re-election campaign. The plane he was riding in crashed short of the runway in an orchard, which killed the pilot and one other person. Kennedy, alive but seriously injured, was removed from the wreckage and discovered to have suffered a collapsed lung, two broken ribs and three broken vertebrae, another instance of the bad luck that has plagued the family for years.

Kennedy Was Expelled From Harvard

Kennedy was tossed out of Harvard toward the close of his freshman year for arranging that a friend take his Spanish exam for him because he was afraid of failing. Had Kennedy failed, it would have kept him from playing varsity football the next fall. The friend, Bill Frate, signed in to take the test using Kennedy’s name, however, he was recognized by the proctor. Both were expelled but told they could return to the school later if there were no other problems.

His Nickname was “Lion of the Senate”

Kennedy, along with members of his staff, authored more than 2,500 bills and co-sponsored around 550 others. Over 300 of his own bills became law as well as the ones that he co-sponsored. In addition, he was known for his effectiveness in dealing with members of the Republican party to find agreement on legislation. In the latter part of the 2000s, Republican members of the Senate ranked Kennedy number one in bipartisanship among the Democrats.

Chappaquiddick Ruined Any Presidential Ambitions by Kennedy

In 1969, Kennedy was serving as majority whip in the U.S. Senate, but his reputation took a hard blow when, after attending a party, his car went off a bridge at Chappaquiddick and a young woman in the vehicle, Mary Jo Kopechne, died as a result. Kennedy was harshly criticized for not reporting the accident until nine hours later, but his supporters insisted that he remain in office.

He Ran for President in 1979

Kennedy announced his run for the Democratic nomination for president in 1979 against President Jimmy Carter. However, the publicity from Chappaquiddick and a poorly run campaign hurt that bid despite that he won in 10 primaries, including California and New York. At the convention, he announced that he was withdrawing as a candidate for the presidency and never ran again.

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PHKRAUSE

 I  did  not  know  that  he  was  kicked  out  of HARVARD his  freshman year===I  did  not  know

that hew  was  in a  airplane crash that  resulted  in  many  injuries====

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Didn't Know About The 19th Amendment

On August 26, 1920, the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution took effect, granting women the right to vote. Here are 5 things you probably didn’t know about the fight to guarantee women the same right given to men...

Single Women in New Jersey Could Vote in 1797

New Jersey single women were temporarily able to vote because of their state constitution, which was vague and said those worth 50 pounds were eligible to vote. For 10 years, unmarried women voted in New Jersey, but married women couldn’t because their husbands were in control of all of the property in the family, so those women were technically worth zero. The New Jersey Assembly changed the law in 1807 by restricting voting to free white males who were 21 or over, citizens of the state and who paid taxes.

Wyoming Was More Progressive Than the Rest of the Country

1869 was a pivotal year in Wyoming, when the right to vote at 21 was given to women by the territorial legislature. Of course, there were those who tried to repeal the act several years later, but they fell one vote short of doing do. When Wyoming was being considered for statehood, Congress threatened that they had to remove women’s right to vote, however, Wyoming held fast and refused, so Congress itself relented and Wyoming became a state in 1890.

President Wilson Expressed His Support for the Amendment in 1918

Carrie Chapman Catt, the suffragist, and women’s roles during World War I swayed President Wilson’s stand on women’s voting rights, and he urged the Senate to vote for it in 1918. Despite his urging, the Senate failed to pass the measure by two votes. It wasn’t addressed again until the following year, when the legislation finally passed.

The Amendment Was Named After Susan B. Anthony

The Suffrage Committee chairman, James Mann, introduced a resolution in 1919 to grant women the vote that was called the Susan Anthony Amendment. It was passed by the House with a vote of 304 for and 89 against, well above the required majority of two-thirds. The 19th Amendment was passed by the Senate several weeks later, it then went to the states to be ratified.

Several States Held Out a Long Time Before Ratifying the Amendment

Some states waited for many years before finally ratifying the 19th Amendment, and Mississippi was the last state to do so on March 22, 1984. Louisiana ratified the amendment in 1970 and North Carolina waited until 1971 to do so. However, Illinois, Wisconsin and Illinois ratified the amendment within six days of its passage with New York, Kansas and Ohio following suit shortly afterward.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that single women in NEW JERESY could  vote  from 1797 until 1807====

dgrimm60

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phkrause

5 Insane Guinness World Records of All Time_2

On August 27, 1955, the first edition of the Guinness Book of Records was published in the UK, and it's been cataloging bizarre accomplishments ever since. Find out some of the interesting world records that have been documented by this popular publication...

The Tallest Man in the World

Robert Wadlow was named as the tallest man in the world, who was measured under medical supervision and stood at 8 feet 11.1 inches in 1940, shortly before his death. He began life as a normal-sized infant, weighing 8.7 pounds but had reached the height of 5 feet 4 inches by the time he was five. His extreme height was caused by a malfunction of his pituitary gland, and Wadlow died at 22 years of age in part due to an autoimmune disease but was still growing up to the time of his death.

The Longest Fingernails on a Female

Lee Redmond, a resident of Salt Lake City, has held this record since 2008 after not filing her nails since 1979. The total length of all her nails was 24 feet, 7.8 inches as measured in 2003. The nail on her right thumb was longest at 2 feet, 11 inches.

The World’s Biggest Parade of Alpacas

Alpaca lovers should have been in Juliaca, Peru, in 2019, to see the biggest parade of these cute faced animals when 1,048 were featured at the 58th anniversary of the southern cattle fair. There were two alpaca species trotting along consisting of the Suri with their long, curly coats, and the Huacaya, which has fur that looks more spongy. They were required to walk 1 kilometer (0.62 miles) and stay close enough together to represent a chain as a tribute to Mother Earth.

Largest Wind Up Toy Collection

In 2011, William Keuntje of Landing, New Jersey, was recognized as having the biggest collection of wind up toys. He started collecting them after receiving one in 1975 as a Christmas present and as of 2011 had a staggering 1,042 wind up toys (hopefully not all going at the same time). In celebration, Keuntje held a “Wind It Up” event at his home and gave a wind up toy to the winner of a quiz about toys.

Oldest Tortoise

In 2019, Jonathan, a 187-year-old tortoise that lives on the island of St Helena in the Seychelles, was named as the oldest living chelonion. Jonathan has a documented history that proves his birth from around 1832 and has lived through 39 American presidents, seven British monarchs, the Russian Revolution and both world wars. Jonathan has also lived longer than the first airplane flight, incandescent bulb and photograph taken of a human.

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