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5 Things You Probably Didn't Know About California

On September 9, 1850, California became the 31st state in the union. It's one of the most geologically and geographically diverse states in the nation, and its history is rich and extensive. Here are five things you didn't know about California...

From Lima Beans to Luxury: Beverly Hills Used to Be a Bean Farm

Beverly Hills may be known now for stars and fancy cars, but long ago, it was a water-rich (yes, really, in Southern California) ranch used for growing lima beans. In fact, the area was long known for its water sources, with the Tongva, the California Indians who inhabited the area, calling it "the gathering of the waters." The original Spanish name was "El Rodeo de las Aguas" as well. The water made the site perfect for establishing a town, and the ranch was eventually sold off in parcels to developers. Even the name "Beverly" comes from a farm in Massachusetts. The water sources dried up in the 1850s and 1860s, and repeated droughts and financial crises prevented developers from completing many of their plans until the early 1900s, when Beverly Hills was incorporated in 1914.

The Bear on the Bear Flag Has a Model and a Name

The California bear flag is easy to spot and remember, particularly for its brown California grizzly bear that takes up the center of the flag. Turns out that bear is more than just a work of art; it's based on a real bear named Monarch. The California flag has long has a bear image on it, with the original version meant to scare authorities because of the grizzly's nasty reputation. But the official, current flag's image was based on Monarch, a trapped grizzly who was put on display at Golden Gate Park and, after his natural death (he wasn't killed), whose skeleton and pelt were used for museum displays.

The Whole Coast Was Designated a National Monument

The entire coastline of California is called the California Coastal National Monument, a federal monument that is protected by the Bureau of Land Management. The wildlife along the coast are also protected as part of a National Conservation Land. The monument includes points of interest such as offshore rocks, lighthouses, viewpoints such as the Lost Coast Headlands, and Cotoni-Coast Dairies, a state park that offers sweeping views west of Highway 1 and farms east of Highway 1. Keep that in mind the next time you have a barbecue on a beach -- clean up after yourselves and take care of one of the best national monuments in the country.

Pre-State California Was Never Officially a Territory

Before California became a state, it was a region named California that had been gotten from Mexico as part of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. The discovery of gold and the influx of thousands of people to the formerly sleepy area made the U.S. government sit up and take action quickly; they both wanted to exploit the rich veins of gold in the state as well as provide for all the new people arriving in the area. Normally, land that was on its way to statehood went through an official territory phase, but in California's case, the government waived the territory requirement and fast-tracked the region to statehood in 1850.

Entering a Building in Old Town Sacramento? You Just Used a Balcony Door

The Central Valley of California is known for its agriculture, and currently, its water woes. However, the valley has historically gotten huge storms and been underwater from flooding every so often. These storms, called atmospheric rivers due to the riverlike formation of storm after storm after storm that would hit the area, became particularly bad in the early 1860s. So bad, in fact, that the U.S. Geologic Survey has based the scenario for a disastrous mega-storm on the flooding events of 1861-1862, giving the scenario the name "ARkStorm" ("ARk" stands for "Atmospheric River 1,000"). The 1860s were so bad that the state capitol's workers had to temporarily leave Sacramento. By the end of the 1800s, the streets of Sacramento were raised up a full story, so that the street-level doors you see now on buildings from that era were once balcony doors on an upper story.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that BEVERLY HILLS  use  to be  a  lima bean  farm=== I  did  not know  how

the bear  on  the  State  Flag  got  there===

dgrimm60

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phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know About Cats, the Musical

On September 10, 2000, the long-running musical Cats ended its spectacular 18-year run on Broadway. Andrew Lloyd Webber's musical was popular on both sides of the Atlantic and brought a literary classic into modern view. Here are five things you didn't know about Cats, the Musical...

Cats Almost Included Dogs

The Jellicle cats in T.S. Eliot's original story, upon which Cats was based, almost had canine companions called Pollicle dogs. He wanted to include both animals in his book of poetry but found that he had a harder time writing about the dogs than the cats. Correspondence shows the gradual decline of his confidence in creating satisfactory poetry about the dogs, and eventually, he wrote that he had to set the dogs aside and concentrate only on the cats in his book.

Cats Wasn't Too Popular With Investors Before It Took Off

No one on the investment side -- play producers need investors to back productions financially -- was too enthused about a show about cats. Despite T.S. Eliot's popularity and how well-liked his book of cat poetry was, a whole musical about cats just didn't seem like a winner. Andrew Lloyd Webber had to mortgage his house to support the show. Luckily for him, that paid off handsomely, with Cats becoming one of the longest-running musicals in both the U.S. and the U.K.

One Performance Had an Alleged #MeToo Moment

A performance in January 1997 left one audience member irate -- and suing the production for $6 million -- because Rum Tum Tugger got a little too up close and personal. Cats cast members were known for involving the audience on occasion, such as through dancing or actually sitting among the audience as the show started. One cat, Rum Tum Tugger, allegedly tried to pull Evelyn Amato out of her chair; according to a letter she sent as a complaint, she repeatedly yelled no and felt the pulling motion was way too aggressive. She then claimed that the actor gyrated his hips in her face and grabbed her head, moving it from side to side. The case didn't make it to trial, and the actor in question was no longer with the show.

The Cats in the Original Broadway Performance Actually Had Yak Hair

Despite the copious amounts of fur that your cat seems to shed on you whenever you dress up, or the "second cats" that appear after a brushing session, you can't get enough fur from a cat to create a human-sized cat costume. For a show as large as Cats that would require enough hair for all the costumes plus extra hair for repairs, another source is necessary. In the case of the original Broadway production, that source was yak hair -- more than 3,000 pounds of it.

The Revivals Have Sometimes Shaken Things Up

Cats ended its main run in 2000, but it has been revived in recent years with some changes. One change was that the character of Rum Tum Tugger became a hip-hop-style, rapping cat; another production had Grumpy Cat guest-starring as an honorary Jellicle cat. A movie in the works uses digital effects to create the fur that actors will wear (much to viewers' dismay, as the effects were called "creepy"). The core of the story and the lyrics remain the same, but new producers are no doubt going to experiment further with the musical.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

 I  did  not  know  that  dogs  were  going to  be included  in the  play at 1st  but then left then  out====

I did not  know  that  3000  pounds of  YAK hair  was use====

dgrimm60

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phkrause

5 Things You Probably Didn't Know About the 9/11 Attacks_2

On September 11, 2001, Islamic terrorists crashed two airliners into the World Trade Center in New York, causing the 110-story twin towers to collapse. Another hijacked airliner hit the Pentagon and a fourth crashed in a field in Pennsylvania. Here are five things you didn't know about the September 11, 2001 attacks.

A Labrador Retriever Named Roselle Saved 31 People

A seeing-eye dog named Roselle that belonged to Michael Hingson was along with her owner on the 78th floor at his job in Tower 1 of the World Trade Center when the plane struck the building. The dog led her owner, along with 30 others, down to safety through the confusion and smoke, staying focused and calm even when debris was raining down on people in the group. Once outside the building, the heroic dog led her owner to the subway station to go home as though it had been an ordinary day.

One of the Plane Engines Survived the Disaster

Despite the mass destruction that occurred to the twin towers on September 11, one of the plane’s engines survived intact, despite the buildings’ collapse and explosions. It was found several blocks from the twin towers in downtown Manhattan between 50 Murray Street and 51 Park Place.

Orders Were Given to Shoot Down One of the Planes

When it was discovered that United 93 had been taken over by terrorists, it was reported that Vice President Dick Cheney gave orders to intercept the plane and shoot it down before it could reach the nation’s capital. However, Air Force fighter planes were already airborne and would not have been able to bring the plane down in time, according to a report. The report on 9/11 states that military officials said that if the passengers had not caused the plane to crash, fighter jets would have, but this has been shown to be incorrect.

One Firefighter Was Killed by a Jumper

A woman who either jumped or fell from one of the towers landed on Daniel Suhr, which caused catastrophic injuries to the firefighter. Several other firefighters rode along with him in the ambulance to Belleview Hospital, and efforts were made to resuscitate the man who had been nicknamed “Captain America.” Ironically, seven of the firefighters who stayed with him would probably have been killed when the tower crashed down minutes later.

20 People Survived Under the Rubble

Genelle Guzman-McMillan was inside the World Trade Center and working when she heard a loud noise from her office at the Port Authority. She ran downstairs as the building collapsed and because the last living person saved from underneath the rubble 27 hours later. Three police officers and six firefighters were among the other 19 individuals who were pulled out alive.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

 I did  not  know  that a dog  saved 31 people===I  did  not  know that 20  people  were  saved  from the rubble==

dgrimm60

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phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know About Johnny Cash_2

On September 12, 2003, country musician Johnny Cash died at age 71. Despite Cash's omnipresence, there's still plenty of little-known facts to learn about the legendary performer. Here are 5 things you didn't know about "The Man in Black"...  

Cash Helped Dig a Grave for His Brother

At 12 years of age, Cash’s family experienced a tragedy when their son, Jack, was dragged into a table saw while working at a sawmill to help the family out financially. He lived for a week but never had any chance of surviving the injury. Johnny helped dig the grave for his older brother and drove a nail into his foot while doing so, which necessitated attending the funeral service barefooted.

Cash Became an Ordained Minister

After his marriage to June Carter in 1968, Cash decided to study religion in the 1970s and rededicate his life to Christ. He became an ordained minister after obtaining a degree in theology. Although he did not build up a congregation or focus on guiding others by offering to officiate at church services, he was the minister at the wedding of one of his daughters.

He Went to Jail Numerous Times

Cash was busy getting arrested between 1959 and 1968 for things such as reckless driving, picking flowers, drug possession and being drunk in public. One of those arrests was for picking flowers in somebody’s yard while he was inebriated in Starkville, Mississippi. He apparently wasn’t sorry for his misdeeds because he yelled and kicked the door of his cell so hard that he broke his toe.

The Government Sued Him for Starting a Fire

Cash was driving his truck that he had named after the Old West outlaw Jesse James when one of the wheel bearings overheated and started a huge forest fire in Los Padres National Forest. Having 508 acres burn down because of your truck was bad enough, but the forest that burned happened to be home to 53 California condors. Forty-nine of the endangered birds died in the blaze, and Cash had to pay $82,001 to the federal government for the damage.

He Was a Writer in Addition to Being a Singer

Always with an eye toward entertaining others, Cash showed early promise by writing a piece that was published in the military newspaper Stars and Stripes while he was serving in the Air Force. He wrote several autobiographies over the years, “Man in Black” in 1975 and “Cash: The Autobiography” in 1997. Moving away from books about himself, in 1986, his book, “Man in White,” was published, which was a fictional story about the apostle Paul.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that  he  help dig  a  grave  for  his  older  brother===I  did  not  know  that

he had been  arrested several  times between  1959 and 1968====

dgrimm60

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phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know About Hershey's_2

On September 13, 1857, Milton Hershey was born -- to the future delight of chocolate lovers. Here are five things you probably didn't know about the man that popularized chocolate candy throughout much of the world...

The Hershey Company Could Have Sunk Early On

Hershey developed his own recipe for milk chocolate, which was followed by delights such as Hershey’s Kisses in 1907, but he might not have been around long enough to enjoy the long-term success the company has experienced. Hershey and his wife Kitty were planning to go on the maiden voyage of the Titanic and had bought first-class tickets. However, they changed their minds about going. Whether it was business or illness, it shows that their decision to cancel their trip was a lucky one.

A Town Was Built for the Company’s Employees

Derry Township was the original name of the small town where Hershey grew up and started his business. Deciding to build his chocolate business there, he realized the importance of happy employees, so he constructed a model community, complete with brick homes, lawns and light poles topped with a Hershey Kiss. Hersheypark was added in 1906 and has remained a favorite attraction for visiting families and locals ever since.

M&Ms Have a Relationship With the Hershey Family

Hershey controlled the chocolate that was rationed during World War II, and the son of Frank Mars, founder of Mars Candy Company, wanted to invent a chocolate pellet with a candy coating but he needed help. He partnered with Bruce Murrie, whose father was the president of Hershey’s, for 20 percent of the new company that was making the candy. The company was named M&M Limited, which stands for Mars and Murrie.

Hershey Established a School for Orphans

The Hersheys were childless but must have loved children, so in 1909, the Milton Hershey School was founded to help lower-income families. Hershey left the school around $60 million when he died and arranged that it would receive 30 percent of the profits from Hershey’s in the future. The school provides free education, board, counseling and health care to around 2,000 students.

Where the Name Came for Hershey’s Kisses Is a Mystery

Chocolate aficionados have been enjoying Hershey’s Kisses since 1907, but only Milton Hershey knows why they were named that, and he isn’t around anymore. One theory is that the sound made by the candy machine when the chocolates plop out sounds something like a kiss, and maybe that’s the reason for the name.

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phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know About the Star-Spangled Banner

On September 14, 1814, Francis Scott Key wrote the lyrics to "The Star-Spangled Banner," which was later adopted as the U.S. National Anthem. Find out these 5 surprising things you never knew about this song and its namesake...

The Melody Is From an Old Drinking Song

A social club in London named the Anacreontic Society had an official drinking song called “To Anacreon in Heav’n,” which is the same tune as “The Star-Spangled Banner.” John Adams, while he was running a campaign for reelection against Thomas Jefferson, borrowed the tune to set to a poem titled “Adams and Liberty.” It warned against involvement by foreigners and mercantilism as opposed to Thomas Jefferson’s sympathies toward the French. While Jefferson won the election as president, the old English drinking song set to Adams’ poem may have endeared the tune to Americans who heard it.

A Different Flag Was Flying When Key Wrote His Poem

During the Battle of Baltimore at Fort McHenry, it was not only raining heavily all night but bombs were showering down. The woolen garrison flag flying over Fort McHenry was 30 feet by 42 feet, which made it so heavy that 11 men were required to raise it even when it was dry. Wet, it might have weighed up to 500 pounds, which would have broken the flagpole, so the 17 by 15-foot storm flag was flying in its place the night of the bombardment and replaced by the garrison flag the next morning, which was when Key must have seen it.

The Song Was Adopted as the National Anthem in 1931

Robert Ripley, the entertaining owner of “Ripley’s Believe It or Not!” pointed out in 1929 that the U.S. lacked a national anthem. He received many letters from the public, which he responded to by saying they should write their congressmen. As a result, Congress was presented with a petition holding five million signatures, and the “Star-Spangled Banner” became officially the national anthem in 1931.

It’s the Name of a Famous Flag

The Star-Spangled Banner is also the name of the larger flag that was flown at Fort McHenry, and was made by a woman in Baltimore named Mary Pickersgill in 1813. It was Pickersgill who sewed both of the flags destined for Fort McHenry. The smaller one was designed to weather the elements, no matter how bad the weather was, which would save wear on the bigger flag.

The Flag Was Hidden During World War II

The flag that flew over Fort McHenry and dubbed the Star-Spangled Banner was sent to the Smithsonian Museum in 1907 for preservation and has only been removed once since it was donated in 1914 by Eben Appleton. When Pearl Harbor was attacked, President Roosevelt feared an attack on the National Mall, so the flag was sent to Luray, Virginia, to the Shenandoah National Park to keep it safe along with other items of historical importance. The flag that was the inspiration for America’s National Anthem is on display at the Museum of American History at the Smithsonian.

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phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know About Lehman Brothers

On September 15, 2008, the venerable Wall Street brokerage firm Lehman Brothers filed for bankruptcy protection, becoming the largest victim of the subprime mortgage crisis. Here are five things you probably didn’t know about Lehman Brothers….

The Investment Company Had Been in Business 158 Years

Before their bankruptcy, Lehman Brothers was one of the largest investment banks in the country. It had been in business for 158 years since its founding in 1850. At the time Lehman Brothers collapsed in 2008, the company had around 25,000 employees nationwide, which shows that no company is too big to fail.

The Bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers Was the Largest in U.S. History

Lehman Brothers had picked up five different mortgage lenders by 2004, which included BNC, which made subprime loans. The company was heavily invested in mortgages, much more than other investment firms. Because of this focus, it was especially vulnerable when the housing market crashed and did not have the capital to handle its losses, which led to the company filing for bankruptcy.

A German Immigrant Founded the Company

Henry Lehman, a German immigrant who lived in Montgomery, Alabama, and ran a dry-goods business in 1844, transformed into Lehman Brothers after the addition of his own brothers Mayer and Emanuel in 1850. American Express owned the company for about ten years when it was spun off and offered shares to the public while showing $3.3 billion in assets. The company’s services continued to expand by combining investment and commercial banking, and this wide expansion may have helped contribute to its collapse.

Shares in the Company Fell 48 Percent in One Day

Shares in Lehman Brothers dropped like a rock in March 2008 because Bear Stearns had almost collapsed, and it was one of the largest underwriters of securities that were mortgage-backed. The view among those on Wall Street was that Lehman would be next, so investors started dumping their stock, and it turned out that the predictions were right.

The Collapse of Lehman Brothers Triggered the Recession

Economic turmoil between December 2007 and June 2009 resulted in the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression, and a heavy contributor was the poor decision to offer subprime mortgages, which allowed borrowers with low credit ratings to purchase homes at high rates of interest. As home prices started dropping in 2007 and the number of purchasers dropped dramatically, it placed the country in a severe economic downturn. Unemployment jumped by 10 percent, millions of jobs disappeared, and Dow Jones dropped by 5,000 points.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that the  he  was  planning  a  trip on the  TITANIC BUT  CNACELLED ====

I did  not  know  that  he  stated  a  school and it  helps  2000  students===

dgrimm60

 

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

  I  did  not  know  that the  turn to  the  STAR SPANGLED  BANNER  was  a  drinking  song===

I  did  not  know  that  it was  not until 1931  that th STAR  SPANGLED  BANNER  that the  song

became  the  NATIONAL  ANTHEN====

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Didn't Know About "Jingle Bells"

On September 16, 1857, the song "Jingle Bells" by James Pierpont was copyrighted under its original title, "One Horse Open Sleigh." Here are 5 things you never knew about this popular Christmas tune...

“Jingle Bells” Wasn’t Written as a Christmas Song

The strains of “Jingle Bells” can be heard throughout the holiday season, but it was reportedly first performed at a church service for Thanksgiving for either the brother or father of James Lord Pierpont, the composer and lyricist of the song. Most people don’t know that several of the verses may have been considered risque during the time it was written since they talk about racing through the snow and crashing the sleigh with a young, single lady on board. Also, the third verse is about falling down in the snow and a passerby laughing.

An Uncle of J.P. Morgan Wrote the Popular Christmas Song

Songwriter and lyricist James Lord Pierpont wrote the song. He was somewhat wild, at least in his early life, and his song lyrics reflect that. After trying his luck as a prospector during the California gold rush, he wrote a song titled “The Returning Californian,” which is about how he was duped into heading to the goldfields, was disappointed and ended up broke. Juliet, Pierpont’s sister, was married to John Pierpont Morgan, whose son became the famous J.P. Morgan, one of the Gilded Age’s powerful financiers, so it might have been a better plan to ask for a job.

Pierpont Was an Unusual Guy

Pierpont might have been a bit of a problem child and was sent off to boarding school but ran away at age 14 to become a whaler on a ship named “The Shark.” Afterward, he joined the U.S. Navy, where he served until he was 21. He was reconciled with his family in 1851 and was in Medford, Massachusetts, when he was inspired to write “Jingle Bells” while watching people out in the snow taking sleigh rides.

“Jingle Bells” Wasn’t the Original Title

The original title of the song was “One Horse Open Sleigh” when the Boston publishing house released it in 1857. The name was changed, and two years later, it was being reissued with the familiar name of “Jingle Bells.”

The Astronauts From Gemini 6 Broadcast it From Space

Shortly before Christmas 1965, astronauts on Gemini 6 reported that they saw an object moving from the North Pole to the South Pole in a low trajectory. Then they said to stand by, and listeners heard the strains of “Jingle Bells.” Wally Schirra accompanied the song with a small harmonica while Tom Stafford shook sleigh bells that they had taken with them into outer space.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that  it was  not  originally written as a Christmas  Song====

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Didn't Know About M*A*S*H_3

On September 17, 1972, the comedy series "M*A*S*H" premiered on CBS and ran from 1972 to 1983, much longer than the Korean War itself. Here are five other facts about this iconic television show that you probably didn't know....  

The Finale Had the Highest Number of Viewers in the History of Television

On February 28, 1983, 77 percent of American television viewers were tuned into “Goodbye, Farewell and Amen,” the finale of “M*A*S*H.” That comes out to a staggering 121.6 million viewers. The show was so popular that prices for commercials shown during the program went through the roof, with the cost being $450,000 for the series finale.

Klinger Was Originally a Bit Part in the Show

The character of Klinger, played by Jamie Farr, was scheduled originally to appear in one episode where he appears on guard duty wearing a dress, even though the character was neither in the movie or original book. The producers and audience liked it so much that Farr was invited back to the show. He became a regular in the following season and was a favorite character by television viewers because of his antics and attempts to get a psychiatric discharge from the army.

Two Cast Members Served in the Army during the Korean War

Alan Alda, who played Hawkeye Pierce, served in the Korean War for six months as a member of the Army Reserve. Jamie Farr served in the Army during the war and toured Korea with the USO at the request of comedian and friend Red Skelton. Other cast members who served in the military included Mike Farrell, who played B.J. Hunnicutt, and Wayne Rogers, who played Trapper John McIntyre.

The Pilot for the Show Was Written in a Couple of Days

Larry Gelbart was a screenwriter and was hired to write the original script for both the movie “M*A*S*H” and the television series. He wrote the original pilot for the television show in two days and was paid $25,000 for the job.

Famous Actors Appeared in the Show

“M*A*S*H” had dismal Neilsen ratings during its first season but was seldom out of the top 10 after that, so it’s no wonder that famous people practically lined up to make guest appearances on the show. Actors Patrick Swayze, Ron Howard, and John Ritter appeared on the show, along with Andrew Dice Clay, Laurence Fishburne, and Shelley Long. Rita Wilson, who went on a few years later to marry actor Tom Hanks, appeared on the show in 1982 as a nurse.

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5 Things You Didn't Know About The New York Times

On September 18, 1851, the first edition of the New York Times was published. Here are 5 surprising facts you probably never knew about the New York Times...

The Newspaper’s Founder Had Gatling Guns Installed on the Building’s Roof

In July 1863, violent demonstrations took place in New York City in protest of a recent law that permitted conscription of citizens during the Civil War but also let Americans who could afford it off the hook if they could pay $300 for a substitute. The protest lasted for four days as shops were looted and properties burned, and attacks were made upon free blacks and rich whites or anyone who was a draft supporter. The editor and founder of the New York Times, Henry Raymond, had several Gatling guns installed on the roof, which he threatened to fire if protesters came too close to the building. The large crowd of rioters took their anger out instead on the New-York Daily Tribune, which was undefended.

The New York Times Once Condemned The Crossword Puzzle

Many people enjoy doing the New York Times crossword puzzle these days, but when the first one was published in a defunct New York newspaper in 1913, this major paper was not as excited. One NYT columnist went so far as to refer to crosswords as a “form of madness” and a sinful waste. The first crossword puzzle in the newspaper appeared after Pearl Harbor was bombed by the Japanese in 1941 when the editor told the publisher that readers needed something relaxing in the face of all the news about World War II.

The New York Times Balked at Using Colored Print

The New York Times was among the last U.S. newspapers to use colored print, even though USA Today and other rivals had started using colored print in 1982. Color was first used in the NYT in the section for book reviews and was limited to using green and orange as a test case because the editors thought there wouldn’t be too much of a fuss if the colors weren’t good. However, on October 16, 1997, the first front-page article appeared using color.

The Puzzle Editor Is the Only Person With a Degree in Crossword Puzzles

Surprisingly, the editor of the crossword for the New York Times, Will Shortz, is a real fan and sold his own first puzzle at age 14. He majored at Indiana University in enigmatology (which is, of course, puzzles) and holds a degree in it. In addition, he obtained a law degree from the University of Virginia, which would have come in handy if the degree in puzzles didn’t pan out as he had hoped.

The New York Times Created The Ball Drop on New Year’s

In Times Square on New Year’s Eve, a glittering electrified ball drops and draws a huge crowd every year, with around 1.2 million home viewers watching on television. This event was created by the New York Times more than 100 years ago and was originally used as an advertising gimmick for the newspaper’s new headquarters. The first time a ball was dropped was in 1905 on New Year’s Day, and the paper advertised for people to come to see the spanking new building at midnight where a fireworks display was presented. People in New York returned yearly, and the first electrified ball was dropped in 1907.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I  did  not  know  that  there  were  GATTLING  GUNS on top to the  new paper  building in 1863

for safety  of the  building===

 dgrimm60

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5 Interesting Facts About The History of Emoticons

On Sept. 19, 1982, Scott E. Fehlman, a professor at Carnegie Melon University, invented emoticons using characters on his keyboard. Here are 5 interesting facts about the history of emoticons, the precursors to emojis which are used on social media today...

Emoticons First Appeared in 1881

Emoticons technically first appeared around 1881, which is the same year metal detectors were invented, Charles Darwin published his final book and a  long time before anyone ever thought of Coca Cola. The first emoticons were used by Puck magazine on March 30, 1881, and referred to as typographical art. They feature the emotions of indifference, joy, astonishment, and melancholy.

The Sideways Smiley Face Was the First Internet Emoticon

It is unknown whether those at Carnegie Melon University were a little slow at picking up on a joke or the first emoticon was just used as an added tweak for messages. Scott Fehlman placed the first emoticon, which was a colon, hyphen, and parenthesis to indicate a smiley face, on a message board online so others could tell that it was meant as a joke. The smiley face emoji is credited to ad man and graphic artist Harvey Ross Ball, who came up with the idea to raise employee morale at an insurance company.

Emoticons Aren’t Quite the Same Thing as Emojis

While emoticons are still in use, in many cases, they have been replaced by the emoji, particularly on social media sites. Emoticons use characters such as letters, numbers, and punctuation marks, while emojis are actual pictures and often based on variations of the smiley face. The first mobile phone known to use emojis was released in 1997 by J.Phone.

A Movie About Emojis Was Released in 2017

The Emoji Movie, starring voices by stars such as Patrick Stewart and Christina Aguilera, was released in 2017 and is about an emoji that lives inside the smartphone of a teenager. Columbia Pictures and Sony Pictures Animation produced this award-winning film. Unfortunately, the awards it won were Golden Raspberries and included Worst Picture, Worst Screenplay, Worst Screen Combo, and Worst Director.

Twitter Emojis Are Tracked

Some people are interested in knowing which emojis are the most popular and which are seldom used, so Emoji Tracker lets them follow what’s happening around the world in real time. Numbers are pulled from Twitter, and they change so quickly that a warning appears for those who might have a sensitivity to lights that blink rapidly.

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5 Things You Didn't Know About The Battle of The Sexes

On September 20, 1973, Billie Jean King won the Battle of the Sexes when she defeated tennis pro Bobby Riggs in a long-anticipated match. Here are 5 things you didn't know about the tennis match between Riggs and King...

King Challenged the Male-Dominated Sport of Tennis

The exhibition tennis match between Billie Jean King and Bobby Riggs, the retired tennis player who had been a superstar in the world for three years running, was advantageous to both of them. King wanted to challenge the pay scale of women tennis players and bring the game to the forefront as a sport back at a time when women could not hold a credit card in their name without their husband’s approval. Meanwhile, Riggs saw it as an opportunity to increase the popularity of tennis, to make money for himself, and to bring his name back into the limelight.

Riggs Wanted to Play King After Beating a Female Australian Tennis Player

Riggs was seeking attention in 1973 when he began slamming women’s tennis and challenging female players to a match. Mostly, he was ignored until Margaret Court, a champion player from Australia, agreed to play him. Riggs was known as a hustler who used drop shots and other tennis tricks, and Court lost the match 6-2 and 6-1, being so badly beaten by the 55-year-old that it became known as the “Mother’s Day Massacre.”

Rumors Flew That the Mob Had Fixed the Match

One of the greatest urban legends in tennis is the subject of a terrific, in-depth piece by ESPN’s Don Van Natta. In his article, “The Match Maker: Bobby Riggs, The Mafia and The Battle of the Sexes,” Van Natta traces the origins of the long-held rumor that Bobby Riggs threw the 1973 Battle of the Sexes. Riggs was allegedly deeply in debt to the mob for a lot of money. Riggs died in October 1995 at the age of 77. His son, Larry, told ESPN his father knew people involved with the mafia and that it was "possible" he discussed throwing the match. 

Their Entrance into the Astrodome Was a Spectacle Worthy of Cecil B. DeMille

Riggs entered the Houston Astrodome, where the game was played, in a rickshaw, accompanied by attractive girls and wearing a Sugar Daddy jacket that he had been paid $50,000  to don. King was brought out in a flamboyantly decorated gold litter carried by members of Rice University’s track team. The two tennis players exchanged gifts of a giant Sugar Daddy given by Riggs and King’s gift to him, which was a live piglet she had named  Robert Larimore Riggs.

King Rockets to Stardom as a Result of the Match With Riggs

After beating Bobby Riggs 6-4, 6-3 and 6-3, for which she was awarded $100,000, King obtained endorsements from Wilson, Colgate, Adidas, and other companies. The following year, she earned nearly $1 million. Riggs took up golf and played tennis in the senior circuit into his 70s. The two players remained friends until Riggs died of cancer in 1995.

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