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5 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Picasso

On October 25, 1881, the legendary artist Pablo Picasso was born in Malaga, Spain. Contact your inner muse, and check out these shocking fact you might not know about one of the most important artists of the 20th century...

He Was Questioned in the Theft of the Mona Lisa

In 1911, art thieves dressed as handymen were in the Louvre after closing hours and stole Leonardo da Vinci’s painting, the Mona Lisa. Poet Guillaume Apollinaire, a member of Picasso’s entourage, told police he had previously sold stolen art pieces to the artist, and afterward, the artist had taken two stolen Iberian pieces that he had bought and sent them to the journal that had published the story about the theft. Picasso was tried in court for stealing art from the Louvre but was crying hysterically and changed his story so much that the case was dismissed, and the real thieves of the Mona Lisa were apprehended later.

Picasso Was a Prolific Artist

Picasso was the best-known modern artist of the 20th century and lived to be 91, producing an estimated 50,000 artworks during his lifetime. In addition to 1,885 paintings, he made 1,228 sculptures and around 12,000 drawings. In addition, he produced 2,880 ceramic pieces and an unimaginable number of prints, rugs, and tapestries.

His Legal Name Wasn’t Really Picasso

Pablo Picasso’s real name was much longer than two simple words; his full name was Pablo Diego Jose Francisco de Paula Juan Nepomuceno María de los Remedios Cipriano de la Santísima Trinidad Ruiz y Picasso. His last name was Ruiz, but he chose to go by his mother’s name Picasso, which is Italian. He explained it to a fellow artist that the name Picasso resonated more and was more uncommon than Ruiz, so that is why he chose it.

More Picasso Paintings Have Been Stolen than Those of Any Other Artist

Art Loss Register, a database of lost, stolen, and found artworks, lists more than 1,000 works by Picasso as either stolen, disputed as to ownership, or lost. In 2015, 271 works by Picasso were recovered from a garage owned by a handyman for the painter, who said they had been a gift from Picasso’s wife, Jaqueline, between 1970 and 1972. The artworks were turned over to an administration that was established for the descendants of the famous cubist.

Guernica Was Picasso’s Most Famous Painting

In 1937, Picasso painted his most famous artwork, Guernica, in response to the Nazi’s bombing of the town of Guernica during the Spanish Civil War. The painting, done in shades of white, blue, and black, features a rampaging bull, which represents darkness and brutality. The horse in the painting, he said, was representative of the people living in the town.

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dgrimm60

rtisstPHKRAUSE

I  did  not  know  that  more  of  his  paintings  had been  stolen  than any  other  artist===

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5 Things You Didn't Know About The Shootout at The OK Corral

On October 26, 1881, the infamous shootout at the OK Corral occurred at Tombstone in the Arizona Territory. Here are 5 things you probably didn't know about this famous gun battle in the Old West...

The OK Corral Wasn’t Where the Shootout Happened

Nope, the shootout didn’t happen inside or even next to the eponymous corral. Shots were exchanged in a vacant lot on Fremont Street, down the road from the corral’s rear entrance. It was the movie, Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, that brought the shootout to the public’s attention. Movie executives probably thought the name sounded better than trying to explain where the gunfight really took place.

No One Really Knows How the Shootout Occurred

Historians aren’t so sure what went down during the gunfight at the O.K. Corral. The Earp brothers and their friend Doc Holliday claimed afterwards that they were trying to disarm the cowboys, who were illegally carrying firearms when the cowboys opened fire. The surviving cowboys alleged that they were fully cooperating and had even raised their hands in the air when the lawmen started indiscriminately shooting them at point blank range. Witnesses to the event weren’t exactly helpful because their testimonies conflicted, and to further complicate matters, the transcript of the ensuing murder trial was destroyed in a fire. The truth is, we may never know for sure who provoked the shootout.

Wyatt Earp Wasn’t Really The Hero of The Shootout

Wyatt Earp went down in history as the central figure of the gunfight. In reality, his brother Virgil was far more experienced than him in combat and shootout situations.  Virgil Earp had served during the Civil War in the Illinois infantry and had a lot of experience handling a gun, even shooting a man in the head from a distance with a Henry rifle, while his brother, Wyatt, was less experienced. Later, Virgil Earp was shot in the back from an ambush with a triple load of buckshot, and a few months later, another Earp brother, Morgan, was killed in a similar ambush.

The Gunfight Only Lasted 30 Seconds

Yup, the dramatic confrontation that left three men dead and three wounded lasted less than a minute. In that span, around 30 shots were fired. The movie Gunfight at the O.K. Corral dramatized the shootout, showing the men heavily armed and engaged in a fight that spanned minutes. In reality, each man carried only a revolver apiece and in the confusion, nobody could be sure who fired the fatal shots.

They Made Movies About It

Of the many filmed versions of the October 26, 1881, O.K. Corral shootout in Tombstone, Arizona, Gunfight at the O.K. Corral was one of the most elaborate and star-studded. In the 1957 film, Burt Lancaster plays Wyatt Earp, the renowned lawman, while Kirk Douglas is the consumptive gambler (and gunfighter) Doc Holliday. The film was nominated for two Academy Awards for Best Film Editing and Best Sound Recording. The film was a big hit and earned $4.7 million on its first run and $6 million on re-release.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that  Wyatt Earp  brother  Virgil  was the  better gun fighter===

dgrimm60

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5 Shocking Facts You Didn't Know About The NYC Subway

On October 27, 1904, the New York City subway opened, providing rapid transit for tired local residents. Here are 5 shocking facts you probably didn't know about the subway system in the Big Apple...

A Subway Ride Initially Cost a Nickel

When the first subway in New York opened, it cost a nickel to ride, then went to a dime and 15 cents. Because the turnstiles couldn’t take two coins, this is when brass tokens were used to pay the fare, and the tokens were in service for half a century until 2003, when MetroCards were introduced. It took nearly 10 years for people to finish using up their tokens, and the MTA ended up stuck with 60 million of them. Strangely, no one seems to know what happened to all those tokens.

The Worst NYC Subway Accident Happened in 1918

On November 1, 1918, after a day of work, hundreds of passengers were aboard the Brooklyn subway train in Lower Manhattan and expected an uneventful ride home. However, 28 minutes after leaving the station at Park Row, the train rounded a curve near the Flatbush station, struck an abutment and crashed. Almost 100 people died and 150 passengers were injured, which was not only the worst subway accident but also the worst train wreck in the history of America.

More People Pass Through The NYC Subway Every Single Day Than Live in All of Denmark

5.8 million people ride the subway every day, 0.2 million more than live in Denmark. We still pale in comparison to Tokyo, though -- its annual ridership (3.334 billion) is nearly twice as large as ours (1.708 billion). Although that's still equivalent to every single person in the USA riding on the subway approximately five and a half times a year.

A Teenager Once Hijacked a Train to Take a Joy Ride

Parents tend to get upset when their teen takes their car for a joyride, but Keron Thomas’s parent must have gotten really upset because their 16-year-old son took the A train instead. Thomas drove the train for more than three hours throughout New York City. Fortunately, he was a smart boy who studied the MTA manuals beforehand. No one was harmed, but Thomas was arrested for his dangerous stunt and picked up the nickname “Train.”

A Scientist Had His Laboratory in One of the Subway Stations

No, it wasn’t Dr. Emmett Brown from Back to the Future, but an Austrian scientist named Victor Hess who kept his laboratory down in the 191st Street subway station at Washington Heights. He purposely wanted to use the deepest station because he was measuring radioactivity in the granite deposits between the 180-foot deep station and Fort Tyron Park. He won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1936 for his efforts in discovering cosmic radiation.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that  it  took  10  years to get ride  of the tokens when  the  when  the  MTA  change to  cards===

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Didn't Know About The Internet

On October 29, 1969, the internet began when a computer network was set up between Stanford Research Institute and UCLA. Here are 5 interesting tidbits you probably didn’t know about the internet....

There Were Other Search Engines Before Google

Most people are familiar with the different search engines like Google, Yahoo, and Bing. However, Archie, which started up in 1990, was the name of the first one and was used to locate FTP files that are used to transfer files between servers and clients. Archie was followed by search engines called Jughead and Veronica, which are names that appear in the Archie comic strip. The Google search engine was the most popular and effective and has stood the test of time.

The Internet Is Really Big

Plenty of research has been done to try to discover how big the internet really is but it has proved incredibly difficult to get accurate results. One study by Google found that there was at least one trillion pages on the net, although they stated that this could account for just a tiny fraction of what is really online. Despite its huge size, experts have calculated that all of the electrons that make up the data on the internet would only add up to around 50 grams. That is the equivalent of one medium sized egg, an incredible fact considering the sheer amount of information that the web contains.

Greenland Has The Most Connected Population

Although it might seem that everyone has an internet connection, the truth is that most countries in Europe and North America only have around a 70-80% connection rate, with many members of society not having any sort of access to the web in their home. The highest connected population is Greenland, where 92% of all of those living there having an internet connection.

Most Data Is Transmitted Underwater

Ninety-nine percent of data transmitted over the internet is done through submarine cables and includes not only data but text messages and phone calls. This way is much faster than using satellites, which would be about eight times slower. When these underwater cables are damaged, whether by earthquakes or even sharks, ships are sent out to pull up the cable and repair it.

Some People Still Use Dial-Up

If you are old enough to remember the early days of dial-up internet access then you would probably imagine that everyone has moved onto broadband by now. You don’t have to wait an age to download anything or have to choose between using the web or a landline phone. Yet, AOL dial-up still has 200,000 registered users paying monthly subscription fees for the service. Experts believe these are mostly people who can’t get broadband or don’t realize they can use broadband without paying for dial-up.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that  GREENLAND  has the  most connected  population===

dgrimm60

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7 Things You Didn't Know About Halloween

October 31 is Halloween. This fun holiday has ancient origins and is one of the oldest holidays on the planet. You know it’s spooky, creepy, and full of candy, but here are 7 things you might not have known about Halloween.

The Holiday Goes Back More Than 2,000 Years

Halloween all started as a pre-Christian Celtic festival called Samhain (which means "summer's end") held around the first of November. It celebrated the final day of the harvest and the crossing of spirits over into the other world. People in Ireland, the United Kingdom, and Northern France would ward off ghosts by lighting sacrificial bonfires, and, you guessed it, wearing costumes, according to History.com.

The First Jack-o-Lanterns Were Not Made From Pumpkins

Back thousands of years ago in the Celtic lands, simple lanterns were carved out of turnip. These lanterns were sometimes adorned with frightful and spooky faces, which were thought to scare away evil spirits that might be out and about on All Hallows Eve.

Halloween is Big Business.

Second only to Christmas, Halloween is the biggest grossing holiday of the year when it comes to shelling out the shekels. Approximately 8 billion dollars will be spent this Halloween, with over 2.6 billion dollars being spent on Halloween costumes alone and plenty more being shelled out for trick or treat candy. 330 million bucks will be spent just on pet costumes!

Skittles Are The Top Halloween Candy

The bite-sized candies outranked M&M's, Snickers, and Reese's Cups, according to 11 years of sales data from CandyStore.com. And even though candy corn also made the top 10, the tricolored treats also ranked among the worst Halloween candies, according to a CandyStore.com survey.

Illinois Produces Five Times More Pumpkins Than Any Other State

The Land of Lincoln has more than 15,000 acres devoted to gourd growing, according to the United States Department of Agriculture. Those Illinois farms typically grow more than 500 million pounds of pumpkins annually.

The Most Popular Halloween Costume is The Witch

Come Halloween night, there will be over 6 million witches running around! Pop culture favorites come and go as trendy Halloween costume choices every year, but the Witch still reigns supreme and continues to hold her spot as numero uno. Other classic costume choices round out the top ranks, including vampires, pirates, zombies, cats, princesses and superheroes.

Candy Corn Was Originally Called "Chicken Feed"

The Goelitz Confectionery Company sold boxes with a rooster on the front in order to appeal to America's agricultural roots, according to National Geographic. The sugary recipe has gone largely unchanged since the 1880s.

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dgrimm60

PHKRKAUSE

 I  did  not  know  that ILLINOIS  was the  top  grower  of  pumpkins=====

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Didn't Know About The White House

On November 1, 1800, President John Adams, in the last year of his only term as president, moved into the newly constructed President’s House, the original name for what is known today as the White House. Here are 5 things you didn't know about the home to the president of the United States...

The White House Wasn’t Equipped With Running Water Until 1833

The “bathing room” that was installed was mostly meant to supply drinking water and fill the reservoirs in case there was a fire. Robert Leckie, an engineer, constructed a system of pipes, pumps, and reservoirs to supply the White House with running water. The bathing room that was installed included a shower, a cold bath, and a hot one that was heated using coal underneath big copper boilers.

A Contest Was Held to Choose the Architect

James Hoban was an Irish architect who came to the United States following the Revolutionary War. Newspapers ran a contest to choose the “President’s House” architect and Hoban’s design was the one that was chosen. He based the design on Leinster House, a ducal residence located in Dublin.

The White House Was Mostly Built by Slaves

In 1792, construction on the President’s House started in Washington, D.C., which at the time was sparsely settled and a long distance from any area with a major population. The commissioners building the city under George Washington’s direction initially wanted to bring European workers to construct the White House but turned to free and enslaved African Americans to provide most of the labor when the initial plan failed. Slaves quarried the stone and rough cut it and constructed the building along with local artisans and laborers from Virginia and Maryland as well as immigrants from Scotland, Ireland, and other locations.

Changes Were Made to Accommodate Franklin Roosevelt

The White House wasn’t handicapped-friendly before Franklin Roosevelt was elected to the presidency four times. Roosevelt had been stricken with polio at age 39 in 1921, which left him partially paralyzed and mostly wheelchair-bound. Elevators, ramps, and a heated indoor pool for therapy were added to the White House to accommodate him.

The Architect Had to Return to America to Rebuild the White House

As the War of 1812 was going on, British troops burned the White House, in part as retaliation for American soldiers who were burning buildings up north in Canada. The roof and interior of the White House were destroyed, and the building ended up a smoldering shell. President James Madison contacted James Hoban, the original architect, to handle the reconstruction of the building. It was completed in time for President James Monroe to live in the building in 1817.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know that  there  was  not  running  water until 1833====

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Harry Truman

On November 2, 1948, Harry Truman defeated Thomas Dewey in one of the greatest surprise upsets in the history of U.S. presidential elections. Here are 5 surprising facts you probably didn't know about Harry S. Truman, our 33rd president....

Truman Didn’t Have a Middle Name

Harry S. Truman was born to John Anderson Truman and his wife, Martha Ellen Truman, on May 8, 1884. The couple had trouble deciding on their new son’s middle name. They ended up choosing the letter “S.” This was a compromise between Solomon, Truman’s grandfather on his mother’s side and Shipp, which was the middle name of his paternal grandfather. Officially, the “S” is followed by a period: “Harry S. Truman.” That’s because Truman used a period with the letter “S” in his correspondence. The Truman Library & Museum offers a detailed explanation of the “S” controversy.

He Learned of the Atomic Bomb Only Minutes After Being Sworn In

Truman began serving as president 82 days after the start of Franklin Roosevelt’s fourth term when FDR suddenly died, and the new president knew little about the plans to end the war. Just moments after Truman’s swearing-in ceremony, Henry Stimson, the Secretary of War, drew him aside to tell him of the atomic bomb project. About four months after this, Truman ordered that atomic bombs be dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Truman Survived an Assassination Attempt

On November 1, 1950, two Puerto Rican pro-independence activists tried to assassinate President Truman at the Blair House in Washington, where he was living while the White House was under renovation. Truman was unharmed, although a police officer and one of the would-be assassins were killed.

The Minimum Wage Close to Doubled Under Truman

A big shift in the 1950 economy was seen when Truman almost doubled the minimum wage through his Fair Deal program. The minimum wage went from 40 cents an hour up to 75 cents, which was an 87.5 percent increase. Some economists reported that this increase in wages lowered the unemployment rate in 1949, which was 6.6 percent, down to 2.7 percent by the end of 1952.

His Grandson Portrayed Him in a Play

For a 2017 run in Give 'Em Hell, Harry!, a play about Truman staged in Wilmington, North Carolina, the lead role went to someone who knew a little about the man—his grandson, Clifton Daniel. A part-time actor and the honorary chairman of the Truman Library Institute in Kansas City, Missouri, Daniel learned his relative's vocal inflections by listening to old recordings.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I  did  not  know that  THE  MINIMUM WAGE  almost  doubled  under him====

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Didn't Know About One World Trade Center

One World Trade Center officially opened in Manhattan on November 3, 2014. The new tower, along with the rest of the World Trade Center complex, replaced the Twin Towers and surrounding complex, which were destroyed by terrorist attacks on 9/11. Here are 5 things you didn’t know about this amazing building.

It’s Known By More Than One Name

What locals and tourists alike call the Freedom Tower is officially One World Trade Center. But the building has a long list of nicknames, including the 9/11 Observatory, the WTC Observatory, and the 9/11 Tower. Don’t worry -- if you use any of these terms, people will be able to give you directions. But since 2009, its proper, legal name has been One World Trade Center. Poignantly, that is the same official name that the North Tower of the original World Trade Center complex carried.

The Height of the Building Is Significant

One World Trade Center has the distinction of being the tallest building in the United States, the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere, and the sixth-tallest building in the world. The construction of One World Trade Center was carefully planned to be 1,776 feet tall. This number corresponds with the year of the signing of the Declaration of Independence. Although the height of the building is 1,368 feet, which is the same height as the original Twin Towers, an added spire increases the height by another 408 feet.

The Lobby is Adorned in Marble From The Old Twin Towers

There are several instances where the new One World Trade building draws inspiration from the former Twin Towers. The lobby uses white marble taken from the lobby of the former World Trade Center. The central spire is visually reminiscent of the original building. The building’s 200-foot footprint is nearly identical to the footprints of the original Twin Towers.

Visitors Seldom Have to Wait for an Elevator

With 71 elevators, those working at One World Trade Center have plenty of choices on how to get to their office. Five of the elevators are express, which take people all the way to the top at 22.5 mph in about one minute. The express elevators are powered by eight electric motors located on the building’s roof and use a pulley and cable system.

It Was Designed With Safety in Mind

Given the understandable concern about rebuilding the towers, extra security features were added to ensure the safety of One World Trade and its tenants. The construction includes a reinforced concrete base, pressurized stairwells, blast-resistant windows, biological and chemical filters through its ventilation system, and more. Security measures such as vehicle screening, surveillance cameras, and video-analytic computer software can detect potential threats.

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5 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Barack Obama_2

On November 4, 2008, Senator Barack Obama of Illinois defeated Senator John McCain of Arizona to become the 44th U.S. president, and the first African American elected to the White House. Here are 5 things you didn't know about the 44th President of the United States...

Illinois Celebrates His Birthday

On August 4, 2017, Governor Bruce Rauner of Illinois signed a bill into law that declared a new state holiday. The law designated August 4th as “Barack Obama Day,” which happens to be the former president’s birthday. The yearly celebration went into effect in 2018.

The Former President Carries Good Luck Charms

Obama said he began carrying mementos when he began his campaign for president because people would give him keepsakes or charms that were important to them. Although he says he has a bowl full of these mementos, he obviously can’t carry them all, so he takes along a few each day as a reminder of people he’s met over the years. Some items he carries can include rosary beads that were a gift from Pope Francis, a small Buddha that was a gift from a monk, a lucky poker chip a biker gave him, and a Coptic cross from Ethiopia.

He Shares Something Unusual With FDR

Franklin Delano Roosevelt was elected as president of the United States four times, so, of course, he had to take the oath of office each time. Obama took the oath of office four times as well, the first because Justice Roberts made several errors, and the president had to take the oath again the following day. The third and fourth times, the date for the swearing-in fell on a Sunday, so he took the oath privately on Sunday and then again on Monday for the public ceremony.

Obama is a Big Fan of Comic Books

Obama is a long-time aficionado of comic books, especially Marvel Comics. He is reportedly fond of Spider-Man and Conan the Barbarian especially. When the creators of Marvel Comics found out, they put Obama on The Amazing Spider-Man cover, which sold out in minutes, as well as the other four special editions with Obama on the cover.

Obama Has Won Two Grammys

Obama won two Grammys for “Dreams from My Father” and “The Audacity of Hope,” which came out as books and audiobooks. He won the Grammys as Best Spoken Word Album in both cases. The books themselves have sold around 4.7 million copies in the print versions.

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dgrimm60

PHKRRAUSE

I did  not  know  that AUG 4  is  a  holiday in Illinois  for  his  birthday===

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Didn't Probably Know About Monopoly

On November 5, 1935, Parker Brothers began marketing the board game “Monopoly,” and has sold more than 250 million games around the world. Here are five facts you probably didn’t know about this board game played around the world...

A Version of the Game Was First Developed in 1903

Charles Darrow is credited with developing Monopoly in 1933, but it was based on an earlier version made by Elizabeth Magie, who named it “Landlord’s Game.” Her game never quite caught on, so Darrow made his own version using oilcloth to cover the board and handwritten cards. He used wooden scraps for the houses and hotels and took his game to Parker Brothers.

Parker Brothers Initially Rejected the Game

When shown the game, Parker Brothers turned it down. Some of the many reasons given were the theme, the difficulty of playing it, and the length of time it took to play. Because it became successful locally, the company decided to take another look at the game and struck a deal with Darrow. Even though the Great Depression was going on, the new game sold like crazy. The company had to produce 35,000 copies each week during the first year after its release in 1935.

The Original Tokens Were Inspired by a Charm Bracelet

Darrow’s niece provided the inspiration for the game tokens with her charm bracelet. The original pieces were the cannon, top hat, iron, thimble, shoe, and battleship. As some of these pieces became obsolete, they were replaced. The newest pieces included with the game are the top hat, cat, battleship, car, rubber ducky, penguin, and a Tyrannosaurus rex.

The Game Provided a Surprising Use During World War II

The secret service in Britain used Monopoly games during World War II to smuggle POWs supplies to escape. Posing as charities, they shipped the packages to their prisoners, and apparently the Germans never noticed they were anything but boxed games to keep the prisoners amused. The boxes contained handy items to use when escaping such as a file and compass that served as playing pieces, a map concealed inside the board, and banknotes hidden underneath the colorful Monopoly money.

Surprising Records Have Been Set by Monopoly Devotees

Some people may know that the current record for a Monopoly game is 70 days straight, which works out to 1680 hours, but there are other records that have been set by Monopoly players. The longest game played underground was 100 hours long, the longest game played while in a bathtub was 99 hours, and players were even up in a treehouse playing for 286 hours. In 2012, three young men from Philadelphia set a record for balancing a Monopoly game for 2 minutes 43.61 seconds on top of their heads.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that  the game pieces  came  from  a  charm  bracelet===

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Honest Abe_2

On November 6, 1860, Abraham Lincoln was elected as the 16th president of the United States. See if you know these five lesser-known facts about the 16th President of the United States...

He Towered Over Everyone Else

Those who are elected president of the United States are often tall, but Lincoln ties with Lyndon Johnson as the tallest at 6’4”. Lincoln almost always wore his stovepipe hat, which was between 7” and 8” high, so fully dressed, he would have appeared to be about seven feet tall. Since the average man during the period of the Civil war was between 5’6” and 5’7”, Lincoln would have appeared to be a towering presence in comparison.

A Medium Warned Lincoln About the Assassination

Charles J. Colchester worked as a medium and held seances for Mary Lincoln, who was grieving for the loss of Lincoln’s son, Willie, who died of typhoid fever in 1862 at age 11. Colchester warned the president of an assassination attempt even though Lincoln barely knew the man. This warning may have been given because the medium was a friend of John Wilkes Booth. By April 1865, Booth had abandoned plans to kidnap Lincoln and decided to kill him, which he announced to some of his friends. Perhaps Colchester was one of the people who learned of the plot.

Those Who Enjoy Celebrating Thanksgiving Should Thank Abraham Lincoln

It was President George Washington who announced that November 26, 1789, a Thursday, would be a day of public thanksgiving and prayer. However, in 1863, Abraham Lincoln was the president who made it a federal holiday. The new federal holiday was to be celebrated the last Thursday in the month of November.

Grave Robbers Attempted to Steal His Body

A group of counterfeiters in the 1870s had problems when their master engraver, Ben Boyd, was caught and sent to prison. They devised a scheme to steal Lincoln’s body and hold it for ransom until Boyd was freed and they were paid $200,000. Their plans were foiled when one of the counterfeiters let the plot slip to someone, so they fled to Chicago where they decided to try again. Unfortunately for them, a new recruit brought in on the kidnapping scheme was a secret service agent, and they were sentenced to prison.

Lincoln Never Slept in the Lincoln Bedroom

What is now the Lincoln bedroom in the White House served as Lincoln’s office during his term as president, not as his bedroom. It was here that he signed the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863. However, the furniture in the room that became known as the Lincoln bedroom was purchased in 1861 by Mary Todd Lincoln, including the eight-foot by nine-foot rosewood bed.

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I did  not  know  that  both  LINCCOLN   was  as  tall  as  L.B. J.   at  6 ft 4 in===

dgrimm60

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5 Lesser Know Facts About FDR

On November 7, 1944, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt was elected to an unprecedented fourth term in office. Here are 5 lesser know facts you didn't know about the only president to have served more than two terms...

FDR's Nickname Was The Sphinx

While FDR is already on-point in terms of a nickname, journalists stepped up their game in the late 1930s and branded him The Sphinx since he refused to say whether he'd run for a third term in 1940. As a result, an eight-foot paper-mache sculpture of FDR as The Sphinx was made in 1939 and was the centerpiece for the White House Press Correspondents Dinner. (And it still exists!)

FDR Was The First Sitting President to Fly in a Plane

At a time when air travel was much more dangerous, Roosevelt flew to Chicago in 1932 to accept the Democratic nomination for president. He then became the first sitting president to travel by airplane during his time in office. Crossing the Atlantic by air, Roosevelt flew in a Boeing 314 Flying Boat dubbed the Dixie Clipper to a World War II strategy meeting with Winston Churchill at Casablanca in North Africa. 

He Married His Distant Cousin

Much has been documented about FDR's admiration for his distant cousin, Theodore. But few people realize that Eleanor was actually also a family member (albeit a distant one). Anna Eleanor Roosevelt was FDR's fifth cousin once removed and the niece of then-President Teddy Roosevelt. Teddy actually walked Eleanor down the aisle on her wedding day, March 17, 1905, because Eleanor's father had passed away. Sadly, Great Uncle Teddy wouldn't live long enough to see FDR rise to the presidency—he died in 1919.

Secret Service Agents Ruined Photos of FDR in a Wheelchair

Most people know that FDR contracted polio in 1921 and spent most of his adult life relying on a wheelchair. Roosevelt was notoriously private about his ailment, choosing to have most public appearances showing him sitting in an open chair or standing behind a podium. Roosevelt never explicitly denied that he’d lost the use of his legs, but he sure did his damnedest to keep people—especially of the camera from seeing him wheel around.  Few photos depict FDR in a wheelchair and for good reason—media figures who tried found themselves getting their cameras confiscated or film ripped out as a result.

He was the First President to Make a Woman Part of His Cabinet

It's something you can say about FDR: he didn't completely buy into gender roles. The late president was actually the first to name a woman to his cabinet: having appointed Frances Perkins as the Industrial Commissioner of the State of New York in 1929, he offered her the role of Secretary of Labor in 1932. She stepped down in 1945, resigning after Roosevelt's death in 1945.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I  did  not  know  that  he  was  the  1st  sitting  President  to  fly  in  a  airplane 

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Didn't Know About X-Rays

On November 8, 1895, physicist Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen discovered a strange effect related to cathode rays. He called the rays and their effects X-rays. Here are five things you didn't know about X-rays...

X Stands for "Unknown."

X-rays were discovered by accident, and Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen, the physicist who discovered the rays, had no idea why they were doing what they did. He was experimenting with cathode rays when he noticed they caused another part of his equipment to glow; he also found that the rays allowed him to see a faint image of the bones in his hand. Because he didn't know why the rays could do all that, he named them X-rays, with the X standing for "unknown."

It Took 9 Years of Unfettered X-Ray Use to Discover They Were Dangerous.

Scientists didn't quite understand how dangerous X-rays could be for several years. The rays were quickly put to use in medicine and other investigative fields; people thought they were harmless and used them whenever they were needed or whenever people thought they would be helpful. It wasn't until 1904 that people realized the rays could have adverse effects when Clarence Dally, one of Thomas Edison's assistants, died of skin cancer that was thought to be related to his use of X-rays in research. Even after that, X-rays were widely used in society, even showing up in shoe stores as a way to gauge fit.

They Were Originally Used to Burn Away Moles.

If you thought the "shaving" method was nerve-wracking, think again. Scientists noticed that X-rays could burn, and thus they were used to burn away moles on the skin. That practice, thank goodness, has long been gone, but X-rays are still used in treatments such as cancer radiation therapy to kill off cancerous tissue.

Someone Tried to Make Lead Underwear a Thing.

In the early years of X-ray use, those rays became popular not just with doctors, but with the public at large. X-rays found their way into popular culture, with speculation about such things as glasses that could make you see through everything, including clothing. (Yes, even in the 1890s people were talking about X-ray specs.) As a result, manufacturers tried to sell lead underwear as a way to prevent potential peeking.

They're Now Used for More Than Just Medical Exams.

X-rays are a part of many fields now, from astronomy and archaeology to art and geology. While we think of X-rays as those things at a medical clinic, chances are that if you work in any field that involves physical investigation, you're going to encounter an X-ray machine at some point in your tenure. They can investigate more than just physical items into which you want to see; they've even been used to spot black holes.

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