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phkrause

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I  did  not  know  that  lead  under ware  was the  result  of making   X RAY glasses  to  see though  clothes===

dgrimm60

 

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phkrause

5 Things You Probably Didn't Know about Willie Nelson_2

On November 9, 1990, Willie Nelson's assets were seized by the IRS to pay back part of the $16.7 million he owed in taxes. Here are 5 things you probably didn’t know about country singer and songwriter Willie Nelson...

Nelson Recorded a Special Album to Pay the IRS Debt

After Nelson’s home and other assets were seized by the IRS in 1990, he was left with a debt to the government of $32 million. While it was negotiated downward, it was still a great deal of money to owe. Nelson recorded a new album called “The IRS Tapes: Who’ll Buy My Memories” to help pay that debt off. The limited-edition album cost $19.95 and 15 cents out of every dollar went toward paying down his IRS debt.

“On the Road Again” Was Written on an Airline Vomit Bag

Nelson said he was in an airplane with directors Jerry Schatzberg and Sydney Pollack, who were looking for songs to include in Honeysuckle Rose. He said the song just clicked inside his head, so he wrote the lyrics on one of the airline sickness bags that was provided. 

Nelson Calls His Favorite Guitar Trigger

Nelson has had his Martin N-20 guitar since 1969, and it creates the sound that the entertainer wants in his songs. Over the years, the guitar has been autographed by more than 100 people, including Leon Russel, who was the first to sign it. The guitar was rescued more than once, first when it was pulled from Nelson's burning house and again when the IRS was seizing Nelson’s assets.  (Nelson hid it.)

Getting Into a Fight With Nelson Would Be a Mistake

He’s been training for several decades in Gong Kwon Yu Sul, which is a type of martial arts practiced in Korea, and he was awarded a 5th-degree black belt in 2014 at age 81. His interest in martial arts began early when he was writing songs in Nashville. He also holds a second-degree black belt in Taekwondo, so despite his age, he probably isn’t someone to challenge.

He Saved His Pot From a Burning House

Nelson got home one day during the evening hours to find out his house in Ridgetop, Tennessee, was on fire. He ran into the house to retrieve a pound of marijuana that he had there but said he went to get it because he didn’t want to get arrested by police if the firemen found it. Unfortunately, about 100 tapes full of songs that hadn’t been recorded yet were lost in the blaze.

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phkrause

6 Things You Might Not Know Were Invented by Women

On November 10, 1903, Mary Anderson patented her invention of the windshield wiper. Cadillac was the first to include them in every car model, and other companies soon followed. Find out about some other surprising inventions that were designed and patented by women...

Carpenters Can Thank a Woman for Inventing the Circular Saw

In 1812, Tabitha Babbitt, a weaver who lived in a Shaker community, noticed how difficult it was for people to use a pit saw, which needed two individuals to operate and cut only in a single direction. She solved that problem by attaching a circular blade to a spinning wheel. The circular saw proved to be a more efficient way to perform the task and led many men in later years to create home workshops in their garages.

A Woman Invented the Life Rafts Used on the Titanic

Inventor Maria Beasley was already a wealthy woman because of her eight patents for the barrel-hooping machine (an invention that made it easier to place the metal bands on barrels). In 1882, she patented a design for a foldable life raft with fireproof guardrails. The life rafts invented by Beasley were used onboard the luxury liner Titanic and are credited with saving more than 700 lives when the ship sank in the North Atlantic in 1912.

The Dishwasher Was Invented by a Woman

Patented in 1886, the first dishwasher combined high water pressure, a wheel, a boiler, and a wire rack like the ones still used for dish drying. Inventor Josephine Cochrane never used it herself, but it made life easier for her servants. This invention is still a lifesaver for many households today.

A Movie Star Invented Wireless Transmission Technology

Movie siren Hedy Lamarr was not only beautiful but brainy. She created a communication system in 1941 to guide torpedoes without detection. Her design manipulated the radio frequencies to operate at irregular intervals so that classified messages could be sent in an unbreakable code and could not be intercepted by the enemy during World War II. Her groundbreaking technology in wireless transmission led the way for other inventions, including Bluetooth, WiFi, and GPS.

Rocket Fuel Invented by a Woman Powered Explorer I

Mary Sherman Morgan was instrumental in saving the space program in America in 1957 when she invented Hydyne rocket fuel. Her contribution to the space program allowed the launch of the Jupiter 6 rocket, which was used to boost Explorer 1, America’s first satellite. This brilliant mathematician and chemist designed her own fuel cocktail, which was exactly what was necessary to operate Werner von Braun’s rockets. Without her invention, it may have been necessary to redesign the rockets entirely.

The Board Game Monopoly Was Invented by Elizabeth Magie

One of the most famous board games of all time was invented by Elizabeth Magie in 1904 under the original name The Landlord's Game. Magie's game was a critique of the injustices of unchecked capitalism, making it all the more ironic when her game was completely ripped off by Charles Darrow 30 years later, who sold it to Parker Brothers. The firm eventually tracked down Magie and paid her $500 for her troubles.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

 I   did not  know  that a lady  invented  life  boats that were on the  TITANIC====  I  did  not  know 

that a  lady  invented  the  circular  saw ===

dgrimm60

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phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know About WWI_3

At the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, World War I ended. Here are 5 things you probably didn't know about “The War to End All Wars.”...

The First Tank Used in Combat Was During World War I

Tanks are an essential component of militaries today, so much so that it’s hard to fathom war without them. But up until Sept. 15, 1916 (two years into the Great War), horses were still the main form of cavalry used by militaries. Horses! The United Kingdom was the first empire to employ tanks, in the Battle of the Somme, and they were largely ineffectual. There were too many breakdowns and the French heavily criticized their allies for giving away the advantage of surprise by launching the tanks before they were battle ready.

The Youngest Soldier to Enlist in the U.S. Army Was Only 12 Years Old

Frank Sauliere from San Jose, California, became the youngest doughboy to serve in World War I when he lied about his age and signed up with the U.S. Army two days after Congress declared war. Sauliere’s parents lied too since Frank was only 12, and they went so far as to petition President Woodrow Wilson to approve his entrance into the military. The boy worked running messages, a dangerous battlefield job, and as an interpreter, and during his 21 months of service, he was wounded two times.

World War I Was the Reason Plastic Surgery Was Invented

Harold Gillies, a surgeon, practiced an early form of plastic surgery during World War I when he worked on the terrible facial injuries soldiers suffered from shrapnel wounds. Because shrapnel caused worse injuries than a bullet, reconstruction surgery was used in some cases. However, some soldiers who were horribly disfigured ended up staying in nursing homes rather than going home or appearing in public.

Blood Banks Came into Use During World War I

Before World War I, blood was directly transferred from one individual to another, but this wasn’t practical on a battlefield with the high numbers of wounded. Captain Oswalt Johnson, an Army doctor, was the first person to establish a blood bank at the Western Front by adding sodium citrate to blood, which prevented its coagulation. With this innovation, blood could be kept for up to 28 days on ice and sent to where it was needed for soldiers who had experienced a high degree of blood loss.

The Draft Began During World War I

The Selective Service Act was passed by Congress and signed into law in May 1917 by President Woodrow Wilson. This law was needed to increase the number of soldiers serving at the Western Front battlefields and to relieve the battle-weary troops already there. By the war’s end, around 2.7 million men had been drafted, and an additional 1.3 million had volunteered to fight.

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phkrause

5 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Ellis Island

On Nov 12, 1954, Ellis Island closed its doors. It had served as the reception station for more than 12 million immigrants to the United States between 1892 and 1924. Here are 5 things you probably didn’t know about this gateway for millions to a new life in America....

Pirates Were Hung There in the 1800s

The island that was named after Samuel Ellis, its last owner, served as a spot where condemned prisoners were taken to be hanged in its early days. New Yorkers called it “Gibbet Island,” which was named for the metal casing that enclosed the bodies for display. The gibbet in question was erected in 1781 for Thomas Wilkinson, a convicted pirate who was actually hung on Windmill Island. His body was transported to Gibbet Island and hung as a display inside a metal framework. The idea of displaying the body was to dissuade other sailors from piracy, and the original framework can be seen by visitors to the Philadelphia History Museum at Atwater Kent.

Three Children Were the First to Pass Through as Immigrants

The first immigrants to pass through the immigration station at Ellis Island were three Irish minors unaccompanied by an adult. Annie Moore was 15-years-old when she arrived aboard the steamship Nevada along with her two younger brothers, the youngest of whom was 7. To commemorate the occasion, she was handed a $10 gold piece by officials.

The Immigration Center Burned Down in the Late 1800s

Because the construction of the original immigration center was Georgia pine, when it caught on fire on June 15, 1897, the whole building burned down. While there were no injuries, all the federal and state records from 1855 and before were destroyed. The new building, which was fireproof, was opened on December 17, 1900.

Some Arriving Passengers Could Skip Processing at Ellis Island

Not all passengers had to submit to immigration processing at Ellis Island. The way officials looked at it, if immigrants paid for a first-class or second-class ticket, they probably did not have financial problems and were unlikely to be sick. This meant they would probably not be a financial burden for the rest of American society, so they were given a free pass into the country.

Suspected Enemy Aliens Were Detained There During Two Wars

During both World War I and World War II, aliens who were suspected of being enemies were detained under custody at Ellis Island. During World War I, the inspection of immigrants arriving in the United States was conducted at the docks or onboard the ship, and those who were suspected of being radicals were kept at Ellis Island, with many of them being later deported. When World War II came along, merchant seamen who were thought to be enemies of the United States were kept in the dormitory and baggage building.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that  blood  banks  were  established  during  WW I==== I  did  not  know

that the  youngest  person  to  enlist  in  the  army  was  only  12===

dgrimm60

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did not  know  that the  1st  3 immigrants to  pass  though  ELLIS  ISLAND   were  children===

dgrimm60

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phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know About The Holland Tunnel

On November 13, 1927, the Holland Tunnel linking New York City and New Jersey beneath the Hudson River was opened to the public. Here are 5 surprising facts you didn't know about the Holland Tunnel...

Construction of the Holland Tunnel Shared Several Firsts in History

The Holland Tunnel was built because it was deemed impossible to construct a bridge to connect New York City and New Jersey. This tunnel was the first that passed through the Hudson River and the longest in the entire world when it was completed. The tube width is the world’s widest as well. It measures 29.5 feet wide, which set the standard for underwater tunnels built in the future all around the world.

The Holland Tunnel Gets its Name From the Designer

While many people may think the tunnel was named after the Netherlands for some reason, it was named after the designer, Clifford Millburn Holland. His design was for the two two-lane tunnels. However, Holland died the day before the tunnels were supposed to link on October 28, 1924. President Coolidge had planned a remote detonation as part of the day’s events to celebrate the completion of the tunnel, but celebratory events were canceled due to the designer’s death, and it was decided to name this amazing structure after him.

Calvin Coolidge Opened the Tunnel From His Yacht

When the tunnel was dedicated on November 13, 1927, President Coolidge was aboard his yacht, Mayflower, which was in the Potomac River. He used a telegraph key in gold, which moved apart the American flags located at the Holland Tunnel entrance to signal the opening. This key was the same one used by President Woodrow Wilson to detonate the final blast of the Panama Canal's construction.

Pedestrians Were Permitted to Walk the Length of the Tunnel Only Once

On the opening day of the Holland Tunnel, pedestrians were allowed to cross on foot, but apparently at a fairly high toll, according to a report by The New York Times. It apparently didn’t keep people away because it was reported that around 20,000 pedestrians had walked the length of the tunnel along the entire 9,250 feet within the first hour. That heavy foot traffic continued all day until the tunnel was closed at 7:00 p.m.

The Worst Accident Inside the Holland Tunnel Occurred in 1949

A truck carrying hazardous materials through the Holland Tunnel on May 13, 1949 caught on fire, killing a firefighter and injuring 66 civilians. The truck was transporting 80 barrels of carbon disulfide, which was forbidden. The truck had made it around 2,900 feet into the tunnel when a barrel came free and fell onto the roadway, cracking open. The vapor ignited, catching four other trucks on fire and causing five others to be abandoned. There were 125 vehicles trapped inside the tube before it could be closed.

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