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6 Things You Probably Didn't Know About "Dallas"

On November 21, 1980, 350 million people around the world tuned in to television’s popular prime-time drama “Dallas” to find out who shot J.R. Ewing, the character fans loved to hate. Here are 6 things you didn’t know about the hit television show “Dallas.”

Communism May Have Fallen Because of “Dallas”

“Dallas” was aired in many places around the world, including Romania and Russia. Nicolae Ceau?escu, the last Romanian communist leader, was reportedly tricked into thinking the show was anti-capitalist. According to Hagman, viewers could see the show, which featured the wealthy, feuding Texas oil family, and he thought it led viewers in communist countries to question authority and want more in their personal lives.

Larry Hagman Was Not The First Choice to Play J.R.!

Believe it or not, Hagman was actually not the first person to be offered the part of J.R, with Robert Foxworth being offered, and declining the role. Foxworth said that the role needed to be softer, whilst Hagman made it his own and the rest is history!

Hagman’s Contract for the Show Determined Whether J.R. Lived

After the character J.R. was shot, whether Hagman returned to the role depended on his demand for an increase in salary. In the fourth episode during the fourth season, viewers discovered that Kristin was the person who shot J.R., which is something fans had been waiting for with bated breath. Hagman received his raise in salary and a percentage of the series, so he stayed on the show.

A Video Game Was Made Based on the Television Show

The Dallas Quest was released by Datasoft in 1984 and was based on the television show. The premise was that the player had to search for an oil field map, and if they found it, they would be paid $2 million. Along the way, the player had to fight off the Ewings, angry cattle, and monkeys.

A Song Was Written About the Television Show

Hank Williams, Jr. repeatedly mentions the show’s characters in his 1985 song, “This Ain’t Dallas.” He sings about how they are a working family in Tennessee and are not J.R. and Sue Ellen with their chauffeur-driven limousine. The song reached number four on one of the country charts on Billboard.

The Spin-Off Was Created Before The Main Show!

“Knots Landing” was presented as a spin-off of “Dallas” when it debuted in 1979, but it had actually been conceived before “Dallas”. When creator David Jacobs pitched “Knots Landing” to CBS, the network executives liked the idea but wanted to go with something more "saga-like". Jacobs then created Dallas, which the network accepted and premiered in 1978. After Dallas became a hit, Jacobs was then able to adapt Knots Landing as a spin-off series by way of incorporating characters introduced in the parent series.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that  there was  a  song  written  about  the  DALLAS  T.V. show===

dgrimm60

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5 Shocking Facts You Probably Didn't Know About JFK

November 22, 1963, was the day that President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas, while visiting the state as part of his campaign.  Here are five things you probably didn't know about John F. Kennedy...

JFK's Back Brace May Have Played A Role In His Death

It's possible that his back brace—which JFK wore for his back pain, against the advice of his doctor—might have been the reason he died from his gunshot wounds. The first shot, which went through the back of his shoulder, should have caused him to slump over in the car, and thus avoid other gunfire. But, because of his corset-style back brace, he was "still upright as a target," says Dr. Kenneth Salyer, one of the Dallas physicians who treated JFK on that fateful day. Texas Governor John Connally was also shot in the chest, but because he fell over, he was spared additional damage. If Kennedy had "gone down like John Connally did," Dr. Salyer says, he very well might have lived.

His Last Words Were “No, You Certainly Can't”

Though it’s been reported that JFK’s final words were, “My God, I’ve been hit,” that information is incorrect. His last words were in regards to how well he had been received in Dallas. Just seconds before he was shot, Nellie Connally—wife of Governor John Connally—remarked that, "You certainly can’t say that the people of Dallas haven’t given you a nice welcome, Mr. President,” to which JFK replied: “No, you certainly can't."

JFK Was a James Bond Fanatic

JFK didn't have ordinary heroes: he was inspired by none other than the world's greatest spy. After being gifted a copy of Ian Fleming's Casino Royale in 1955, Kennedy became a massive fan of the author and his most famous character, with Fleming's From Russia With Love earning a spot on his list of favorite books. In fact, JFK was such a Bond fanatic that he even hosted a private screening of Dr. No at the White House.

Kennedy Installed A Secret Taping System in The White House

Richard Nixon was not the first president to record his private White House conversations. In the summer of 1962, Kennedy secretly installed a taping system in the Oval Office and Cabinet Room that transmitted recordings to a reel-to-reel tape recorder in the White House basement. The president likely installed the system to aid him in writing his future memoir, and it captured many historical discussions between Kennedy and his staff, including discussions during the Cuban Missile Crisis.

JFK Got Into A Car Accident With Larry King

Back in 1958, Larry King crashed his car into JFK's while the politician was visiting Miami. While the damage to the cars wasn't particularly bad, the president-to-be, who was parked at the time, was apparently quite upset at the situation. King remembers Kennedy saying, "Early Sunday morning, no traffic, not a cloud in the sky, I'm parked—how could you run into me?" However, Kennedy's anger was short-lived and King claims that the politician said he'd let the issue slide if King promised him his vote.

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The Ten Most Iconic LIFE Magazine Photos

On November 23, 1936, the first issue of the pictorial magazine Life is published. The magazine quickly established itself as the home of iconic photography.  Here are the 10 most iconic LIFE Magazine photos...

Tank Man in Tienanmen Square

A lone man stands in front of a line of tanks, preventing them from moving forward. This simple image has become one of the best-known photos of the 20th century, and possibly in the history of photography. The photo was taken in 1989 in Tienanmen Square in Beijing during the student protests that ultimately led to a major crackdown on human rights. The photo used in LIFE Magazine was taken by Jeff Widener, who was stuck in his hotel, dealing with a concussion from being hit with a rock earlier. Widener was not the only photographer who managed to photograph the scene; Stuart Franklin, for example, also got a shot for the agency Magnum Photos, and his film was smuggled out of China by a French student, who hid the photo among some containers of tea.

Reaching Out (Vietnam War)

Sometimes photos don't reach the public for a few years, and the Reaching Out photo is one of those. Taken in 1966, it didn't hit the pages of LIFE Magazine until 1971. The picture, taken during the Vietnam War by Larry Burrows, shows Machine Gunnery Sargeant Jeremiah Purdie reaching toward a wounded soldier resting on the ground. Purdie himself is wounded, with a bloody bandage wrapped around his head. The picture became one of the best windows into what soldiers were experiencing in Vietnam.

Man on the Moon

Taken by Neil Armstrong as he and Buzz Aldrin stood on the moon on July 20, 1969, this photo remains one of the most iconic in human history. This was the first time humans had stood on the moon's surface (conspiracy theories aside). Aldrin is shown standing in a shallow depression, looking toward Armstrong, reflections visible in his helmet's face shield. Time reports that while Aldrin wasn't happy being the second man to step on the moon,  he did get to be the man on the moon viewers saw because Armstrong was behind the camera.

Martin Luther King Jr. at a D.C. Rally in 1957

Another picture that didn't appear for years was a photo of Martin Luther King Jr. taken in 1957, standing in front of a crowd at the Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom in Washington, D.C. King's back is to the camera manned by Paul Schutzer, with his arms outstretched and the Washington Monument in the background. The photo was not run until April 1968, after Dr. King had been assassinated. However, it became one of the better-known photos of King as it showed both Dr. King and the scale of the crowd at one of the earlier Civil Rights rallies in the country.

Gandhi and His Spinning Wheel

Margaret Bourke-White's 1946 photo of Mohandas Gandhi sitting on his floor reading, with his spinning wheel in the foreground, is one of the more indelible images taken of the leader. Gandhi practiced spinning while he was in prison and kept spinning his own cloth after his release. Spinning became so important to Gandhi that Bourke-White was instructed to learn to spin before she could take the photo. The photo ran in 1948, after Gandhi's assassination.

Black Power Salute at the 1968 Olympics

When Tommie Smith and John Carlos stood on the podium to accept medals at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics after winning sprinting competitions, they made a political statement that was simple but powerful. Both men raised one arm, hand making a fist, in the Black Power salute. They made the gesture as a statement showing that all wasn't as well as people thought and that struggles continued at home. Tommie Smith also removed his shoes and stood in socks, a symbolic gesture meant to represent African-American poverty. The picture was taken by John Dominis.

The VJ Day Kiss

Alfred Eisenstadt's 1945 photo of a sailor grabbing a nurse and kissing her in Times Square in New York as VJ Day was announced is a classic image from World War II. The photo is actually controversial because, if you look closely, you see the kiss wasn't exactly mutual. The nurse has her hand curled into a fist, wedged in between her and the sailor, and many have come to see the photo as one of sexual assault. Greta Zimmer Friedman, the woman in the photo, said there actually wasn't that much to the kiss itself, as passionate as it looked on film.

Graham W. Jackson Sr. and Goin' Home

Chief Petty Officer Graham Jackson is depicted in Ed Clark's 1945 photo playing an accordion and weeping openly as President Franklin D. Roosevelt's casket passes by. The song Jackson played was Goin' Home, and the photo came to represent the link between FDR and the fight for civil rights. However, Jackson had actually played music for FDR several times before FDR's death, so he was mourning a truly personal loss.

Marlboro Man

Clarence Long, or C.H. Long, was a Texas cowboy immortalized in a LIFE Magazine photo by Leonard McCombe in 1949. The picture is simple -- just a shot of Long's face looking past the camera, cigarette dangling from his mouth -- but it inspired the Marlboro Man image used to promote cigarettes for years.

Audience Watching a 3D Movie

3D movies nowadays are distinctly different from the versions shown in the 1950s, but one photo from that time will likely represent the genre forever. J.R. Eyerman's photo, taken in November 1952 at the premiere of Bwana Devil, the first full-length movie filmed in color 3D, shows an audience all wearing identical 3D glasses, with the glasses seeming to take over their identities. The glasses are the first thing you notice, and you have to really look to start distinguishing audience members from one another. That didn't really concern anyone; instead, the audience members reported that the movie wasn't that good and that wearing the glasses for that long was kind of uncomfortable.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I think  I  remember  all of these  except  the  one  with the man playing the  accordion  about

F.D.R.  funeral  =====

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Joe DiMaggio

The great Joe DiMaggio was born on this day in 1914. Born to Italian immigrants in California, he is widely considered one of the greatest baseball players of all time. Here are 5 things you probably didn’t know about the “Yankee Clipper.”

He Was Meant to be a Fisherman

DiMaggio’s parents were Italian immigrants and arrived in San Francisco in 1914, a year after Joe was born. DiMaggio’s father was a fisherman and wanted his sons to follow in his footsteps, but it didn’t work out that way. DiMaggio had skills on the ballfield even as a youngster, so he dropped out of school to concentrate on his great love - baseball. He proved to his father that he could make a living doing something besides fishing; something he loved.

DiMaggio’s Starting Salary Was $8,500

DiMaggio started out playing for the New York Yankees in 1936 at a salary of $8,500. By the following year, he was making $15,000 a year when the average wage around the country was $1,780. In 1949, DeMaggio was the first ballplayer to earn $100,000 a year, which would have been the equivalent of more than $1 million in 2018.

He Enlisted in The Army

In 1943, during his career as a professional athlete, DiMaggio decided to pass up his $43,000 salary, and enlist in the army. He spent the majority of his time in the forces playing baseball with the troops. This was a technique designed to keep morale up and keep the troops entertained. DiMaggio was proud to play his part in using baseball to help the US Army both at home and overseas.

Songwriters Wrote About Him

In 1941, the Les Brown orchestra performed a song titled “Joltin’ Joe DiMaggio” that was written by Ben Homer and Alan Courtney. It was a salute to the popular New York Yankee following his 56-game hitting streak. In 1968, musician Paul Simon mentions Joe DiMaggio in his song, “Mrs. Robinson,” which he apparently didn’t appreciate until he understood that Simon was asking where today’s heroes were.

He Adored Marilyn Monroe to His Dying Day

DiMaggio was married to screen actress Marilyn Monroe in 1954, but their marriage broke up after nine months. They got back together in the early 1960s, and rumor had it that they were going to marry each other again, but Monroe died in 1962. DiMaggio took charge of the funeral and had roses sent for 30 years to her wall crypt three times each week. When he was on his deathbed, he reportedly said, “I finally get to see Marilyn.”

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did not  know  that  he  dropped  out  of  high   school  to pay  baseball====

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Didn't Know About Casablanca

On November 26, 1942, Casablanca, starring Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman, opened with its world premiere at the Hollywood Theater in New York. Here are 5 things you probably didn't know about one of the greatest films in history...

A Deal Was Struck to Get Ingrid Bergman

Producer Hal Wallis reportedly wanted Ingrid Bergman, who was contracted to David O. Selznick, to play Ilsa Lund, even though he had the likes of Hedy Lamarr and Ann Sheridan available. In order to get Bergman, Wallis traded her for Olivia de Havilland (Lady in a Cage). It wasn’t a permanent trade, but it worked, enabling Wallis to cast the woman he wanted as the lead.

Bogart Never Said "Play It Again, Sam"

It’s one of the most famous lines in film history that is emblazoned in the memory of every Casablanca viewer. Even Woody Allen made a movie called Play It Again, Sam — highlighting its popularity. Problem is, Bogart’s Rick, who is often credited with saying “Play it again, Sam” in Casablanca, never did. He said “Play it” to Sam. Bergman’s Ilsa Lund did say something along the lines of “Play it again, Sam” early on in the film but still not the exact phrase.Rick did say “Here’s looking at you, kid” and “Louis, I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship.” The latter, which is the final line in Casablanca, was added by Bogart after shooting ended — it was dubbed in.

Bogart's Height Had to Be Adjusted

Bogart, at 5’ 8” tall, was nearly two inches shorter than Bergman and that just wouldn’t work during filming. The studio got around the height difference by having Bogart stand on blocks or sit on top of cushions to appear taller than his love interest. It’s the apple box effect and all about perspective. And it’s still used today along with other techniques to give an actor an extra lift.

The Fake Rumor That Ronald Reagan Would Star in the Movie Was Intentional

An erroneous legend of Casablanca is that Humphrey Bogart almost wasn't cast in the career-defining role of Rick Blaine in favor of then small time actor and future President Ronald Reagan. This little tidbit has been scattered across trivia games, quiz shows and books throughout the years, but it's mostly based on a false rumor spread by the studio behind the film. Before the script for Casablanca was even completed, the publicity office at Warner Bros. dropped a fake press release to The Hollywood Reporter stating that "Ann Sheridan and Ronald Reagan will co-star in Casablanca," a detail that they knew to be false, but spilled anyway in order to keep the stars' names in the papers in advance of the release of another film they were really in, Kings Row. The truth was that director Hal Wallis never considered anyone but Bogart for the role, and the studio knew Reagan was about to be called into active duty for the U.S. Army.

The Movie Wasn’t Expected to Be a Hit

The script was unfinished during filming; Bogart was drinking and picking fights; Bergman was concerned about her next film, For Whom the Bell Tolls; and actor Paul Henreid, who played Victor Laszlo, called it a “lousy script.” However, instead of becoming an ordinary film that came and went, it became a classic and the one that people quoted lines from more than any other movie in history. It received eight nominations for an Academy Award and won for Best Director, Best Writing Adapted Screenplay, and Best Picture.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I  did  not  know  that    Bogart  was  2 inches  shorter  than  Bergman===

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Bruce Lee

On November 27, 1940, Bruce Lee was born in San Francisco. Lee went on to become a cultural icon among martial arts aficionados.  To celebrate Bruce Lee’s birthday, here are 5 things you probably didn't know about martial arts legend Bruce Lee...

Bruce Was a Competitive Cha-Cha Dancer

Here's a weird fact, but it makes sense if you think about it. Bruce was a decorated cha-cha dancer— apparently, being light on your feet can translate to a wide variety of disciplines. He was the 1958 Hong Kong champion. On the boat over to America in 1959, Bruce taught the cha-cha to fellow passengers. Although he started the voyage sleeping in the bowels of the ship, he got upgraded to first class for his teaching efforts. Now that's resourcefulness.

Lee’s Nickname Was Fitting

According to Chinese astrology, Bruce Lee was born during both the hour and year of the Dragon, which is the strongest animal in the zodiac. It is  believed that anyone born under this sign can overcome all of life’s obstacles. As a child, Lee was nicknamed Little Dragon, and this figure was prominent in his life and throughout his career.

Lee Was so Fast, His Films Had to Be Slowed Down

One of Lee’s pastimes was catching flies in midair with chopsticks, so it isn’t much of a surprise his films had to be slowed down so viewers could see the action. His films were shot at around 32 frames per second, but they were slowed to 24 fps for the movie audience. Lee could perform six leg kicks in one second, which is much faster than the human eye can see.

Chuck Norris Was Given His First Movie Roll by Bruce Lee

Lee was working as the stunt coordinator for The Wrecking Crew, a Dean Martin movie, and he and Chuck Norris were friends. Lee got Norris a job on the movie performing in one of the fight scenes, and Norris even got one speaking line. If you watch the movie, don’t blink or you will miss it.

There Were Rumors of a Family Curse

Bruce Lee and his son, Brandon, both died under circumstances that were somewhat unusual. The elder Lee died of cerebral edema after an allergic reaction, and his son died from a gunshot from a weapon on set that was supposed to have a dummy bullet in it. However, some have speculated that everything from the Chinese mafia to voodoo caused the deaths.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I  did  not  know  that he  was  a  cha -cha dancer  and that  he  taught  cha -cha  less when  he traveled to  United Stages

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Thanksgiving

Happy Thanksgiving, folks!  Whether you're looking for an interesting conversation starter or just really want to know more about Thanksgiving, these surprising facts will make you seem like the smartest person at the dinner table.  So grab a drumstick, and enjoy these 5 tasty Thanksgiving tidbits…

The Original Thanksgiving Lasted for Three Days

When the Pilgrims and Wampanoag Indians celebrated the first Thanksgiving in November 1621, they spent three glorious days feasting on venison, goose, duck, oysters, fish, and eel with cranberries and pumpkin -- but no turkey. Only five women are believed to have been present at the celebration among the 50 Pilgrims and 90 Native Americans. Originally, the Pilgrims intended to make it a day of prayer and fasting, but the arrival of the natives changed all that.

Pilgrims Didn’t Wear the Clothing that Are Commonly Depicted

Most illustrations of Pilgrims in movies, books, and advertising depict them wearing black or black and white with buckles on their hats and shoes. Buckles weren’t used until the late 17th century, and the Pilgrims normally only wore black and white on Sundays. During the week, they dressed in bright colors, which is proven by the estates they left behind in which one woman had a red petticoat, blue stockings, and a purple waistcoat.

"Jingle Bells" Was Originally a Thanksgiving Song

 James Pierpoint composed the song in 1857 for children celebrating Thanksgiving. The title was "One Horse Open Sleigh," and it was such a hit that it was sung again at Christmas. The song quickly became associated with the Christmas holiday season, and the title was officially changed in 1859, two years later.

TV Dinners Were Inspired by Thanksgiving

In 1953, the TV-dinner company Swanson overestimated the demand for turkey by over 260 tons. The owners of the company had no idea what to do with all the leftovers, so they enlisted the help of company salesman Gerry Thomas. Taking inspiration from airplane meals, Thomas ordered 5,000 aluminum trays, and loaded them with the turkey leftovers to create the first TV dinner. 

Sarah Josepha Hale is Known as The "Godmother of Thanksgiving"

Sarah Josepha Hale was a woman truly dedicated to the cause of there being a Thanksgiving holiday. So dedicated in fact that she spent 17 years campaigning for it and wrote letters to five different presidents. Sometimes referred to as the “Godmother of Thanksgiving,” Hale wrote countless articles and letters to persuade President Abraham Lincoln to officially declare Thanksgiving a national holiday that recurred every year.  Hale mentioned in her letter that having such a national day of Thanksgiving would establish a "Great Union Festival of America."  What is Sarah Josepha Hale’s other claim to fame? She was the author of the nursery rhyme, "Mary Had a Little Lamb." 

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PHKRAUSE

I did not  know  that  T.V. Dinners  were  the  result  of  over  ordering  260 tons  of Turkey====

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Probably Didn't Know About George Harrison_3

On November 29, 2001, English musician and songwriter George Harrison died at the age of 58. Here are 5 surprising facts you probably didn’t about this legendary musician...

Harrison's Death Location Was Kept Secret at First

Harrison's death location has pretty much been agreed upon now, but when he first died, all anyone really knew was that it happened in Los Angeles. The first address was listed as somewhere in Beverly Hills but didn't actually exist, and there were also claims he died at the home of his friend, Gavin De Becker, a security expert, on Laurel Canyon. Eventually, Gloria Allred sued for the release of the true address, claiming it was a matter of integrity for public records. It's now accepted that Harrison died at a home owned by Paul McCartney in Los Angeles. The cover-up may have been done for security reasons, to avoid having fans gather in a residential neighborhood and possibly vandalize the area in an attempt to get memorabilia.

He Could Play 26 Instruments

The wide-variety of instruments can be heard throughout the many solo and Beatles albums that Harrison has appeared on. He could play all of the following: Guitar, Sitar, 4-string Guitar, Arp Bass, Violin, Tamboura, Dobro, Tabla, Organ, Piano, Moog Synthesizer, Harmonica, Autoharp, Glockenspiel, Vibraphone, Xylophone, Claves, African drum, Conga drum, Tympani, Ukulele, Mandolin, Marimba, Bass Guitar, Swordmandel, and Jal-Tarang.

He Paid $4 Million To See a Movie

 When Monty Python’s classic feature The Life of Brian was days away from filming, their production company abruptly pulled the plug due to the potentially blasphemous nature of the script. Harrison was such a huge fan of Monty Python that he mortgaged his home, lending $4 million to the production of the movie.  “He paid for it because he wanted to see it,” Python member Eric Idle recalled. “The most anybody’s ever paid for a cinema ticket in history.”

His Date Of Birth Is Often Disputed

For most of his life, Harrison thought his birthday was February 25th. You’ll find most books and biographies state this date. However, near the end of his life, Harrison insisted that he was born on February 24th, 1943 at 11:50PM. A family document has revealed this to be true.

He Wrote a Song About His House

 After buying a mansion with 120 rooms in 1970, Harrison wrote a song entitled “Crackerbox Palace,” which is the name he gave his home. He also wrote a song about the mansion’s original owner, Sir Frank Crisp, called “The Ballad of Sir Frankie Crisp.” The neo-Gothic/Victorian house features, caves, grottos, underground passages and gnomes as well as extensive gardens.

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5 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Jeopardy!

On this day in 2004, after winning 74 straight games and more than $2.5 million, Ken Jennings' amazing winning streak on Jeopardy! finally came to an end. Here are five things you didn't know about Jeopardy!

Ken Jennings Was Obsessed With Trivia as a Kid

Ken Jennings developed a taste for trivia very early on in life and became a fan of game shows as a young child. In fact, he said one of the things he didn't like about starting school was that he would not be able to watch his game shows. When the family moved to South Korea for a time, one of the few English-language shows on TV was Jeopardy!

There’s a 2-Step Audition Process

You have to take an online test (it’s only available once a year) and answer 50 questions in 15 minutes. They never reveal your score, but if you land above a certain percentage (people think 80-85%) you’re put into a pool. Names are drawn from the pool to complete the second step, which is an in-person audition.

The Show is All Taped in One Day

Jeopardy! tapes 5 episodes in a day two days in a row, then takes a two-week break. Contestants spend the early morning filling out paperwork, getting your makeup done, and practicing your “fun facts” while casing the other contestants and doing practice rounds.If you win the first episode you’re on, you have about 10 minutes to change your clothes and touch up your makeup before taping episode number two.So yes, you need to pack more than one outfit.

Jeopardy! Has Set More Than a Few Guinness World Records

A long-running game show is bound to set some records for a network, but Jeopardy! has made it into the Guinness World Records multiple times. Ken Jennings holds the longest consecutive wins on the show with a total of 74 games won in a row in 2004. Alex Trebek holds the record of most game show episodes hosted, announcer Johnny Gilbert holds the record as having the longest career as a game show announcer for one show, and producer Harry Friedman has the most Emmy Award wins by a game show producer.

Alex Trebek Was Once a TV Reporter

Trebek has had a long career as the host of Jeopardy! as well as other game shows in the U.S. and Canada, but he also worked in TV as a reporter for a few years after college. He had started as a philosophy major but moved into journalism after he graduated. Just a few short years later, he decided to move into hosting game shows. Interestingly, his on-air reporter persona gained a reputation as cool and collected -- qualities that have endeared him to game show audiences globally.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that the  show taped 5 episodes  in 1  day===2  days in a row

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Rosa Parks_2

On December 1, 1955, Rosa Parks was jailed for refusing to give up her seat on a public bus to a white man, a violation of the city’s racial segregation laws. Here are 5 things you probably didn’t know about Rosa Parks…

Parks Wasn’t The First Black Woman To Refuse To Give Up Her Seat

Pioneer activist Claudette Colvin was only 15 years old in 1955 when she made the news after she was removed from a bus in Montgomery, Alabama when she refused to give her seat up. Because Colvin was expecting a baby, and the father was married to someone else, the NAACP didn’t think they could get enough support to start a movement at that time. This happened nine months before Rosa Parks made national news after being arrested for the same thing.

Parks Did Not Refuse To Give Up Her Seat Because Her Feet Were Tired

In her autobiography, Parks debunked the myth that she refused to vacate her seat because she was tired after a long day at work. “I was not tired physically,” she wrote, “or no more tired than I usually was at the end of a working day. I was not old, although some people have an image of me as being old then. I was forty-two. No, the only tired I was, was tired of giving in.”

Parks Was Not Sitting in a “Whites-Only” Section of The Bus

Parks was sitting in the front row of a middle section of the bus open to African Americans if seats were vacant. After the “whites-only” section filled on subsequent stops and a white man was left standing, the driver demanded that Parks and three others in the row leave their seats. While the other three eventually moved, Parks did not.

Her Rent Was Paid by Little Caesars' Founder for Years

At the age of 81, Parks was beaten and robbed of $50 in her Detroit apartment and needed to move to a safer location. Mike Ilitch, the founder of the pizza chain Little Caesars and owner of the Detroit Tigers and Redwings, heard about it and offered to pay her rent from then on. She lived in her new apartment until she died in 2005 at age 92.

Parks Holds a Special Honor at the U.S. Capitol

Lying in state is a special honor that is given to few Americans and usually, only to a person who served in a high public office. Only four U.S. citizens from private life have been honored in this way, and Rosa Parks is the only woman to have had this honor. More than 30,000 people filed past her coffin to pay their respects.

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PHKRAUSE

I  did  not  know  that her body was  lying  in state and  she  is  only 1 or  4  private  

citizens  that  have  been  honor   like  this

dgrimm60

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6 of The Largest Bankruptcies in U.S. History

On December 2, 2001, Enron filed for bankruptcy after a scandal that involved hiding billions in assets through failed projects and deals. Here are 6 of the most high-profile and shocking bankruptcies in American history...

Lehman Brothers

Lehman Brothers, an investment bank with assets of $691.06 billion, was heavily involved in subprime mortgages, and it declared Chapter 11 bankruptcy on September 15, 2008. Its assets dropped like a rock when the housing bubble burst; many people lost their homes when the real estate market collapsed. Lehman’s had been in business for 158 years, but only a small part of the company survived the bankruptcy.

Washington Mutual

Washington Mutual, the largest savings and loan bank in the country, filed for bankruptcy on September 26, 2008, under Chapter 11. The cause was a bank run that lasted for 10 days when depositors withdrew over $16 billion in June of that year. The bank, founded in 1889, went into receivership, and most of its branches were purchased by JPMorgan.

WorldCom

The July 21, 2002 filing for bankruptcy by WorldCom, one of the biggest U.S. telecom providers, was the result of the biggest scandals in accounting in the country. The company had tried to hide the fact that it was failing by exaggerating its cash flow and net income. Its former CEO, the 10-gallon hat, cowboy boot-wearing Bernie Ebbers, ended up being sentenced to 25 years in prison as a result.

General Motors

General Motors received $19.4 billion from the federal government, but that didn’t keep the company from filing for bankruptcy on June 1, 2009, in New York. During its bankruptcy reorganization, the feds handed over another $30 billion to save the company. A few years later, GM was out of the red and into the black and had repaid its government debt, but the bailouts cost U.S. taxpayers around $8.9 billion.

CIT Group

CIT Group, which provided loans to small and mid-sized businesses, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy to reorganize itself on November 1, 2009, after its loans were hit hard by the recession. According to the bankruptcy filing, the company held assets of $71 billion but had liabilities of $64.9 billion. After the company took $2 billion in funds through TARP and its shareholders lost everything, the company recovered.

Enron

Enron was the perfect example of accounting fraud, and its illegal price manipulation even brought down the energy company PG&E in 2001. Chapter 11 was filed by Enron on December 2, 2001, and four officials with the company were convicted of insider trading, conspiracy, and fraud, including the CEO. Shares in the company went from $90.75 to a rock bottom price of $0.26 because of the company's cooked accounting books and fake holdings.

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phkrause

5 Things You Probably Didn't Know About James Monroe

On December 4, 1816, James Monroe of Virginia was elected the fifth president of the United States. Here are 5 surprising facts you probably didn’t know about James Monroe...

He Beat George Washington Across The Delaware River

Washington is famous for crossing the Delaware River to engage in a surprise attack against the Hessian (German mercenaries) forces in Trenton, New Jersey in 1776. Emanuel Leutze’s iconic painting “Washington Crossing the Delaware” depicts Monroe just behind Washington, holding up the army’s early American flag. Leutze took a bit of artistic license as Monroe was actually part of an advance unit that crossed the river hours before Washington. James Monroe and Captain William Washington led their men in attempt to capture a Hessian position at the Battle of Trenton. Monroe was shot in the shoulder but received a promotion to captain for his bravery. He later spent the infamous winter at Valley Forge.

He Was The Last Founding Father to Serve as President

While not all of the Founding Fathers served as President, Monroe was the last to hold the honored position. George Washington served from 1789–1797; John Adams from 1797–1801; Thomas Jefferson from 1801–1809; and James Madison from 1809–1817. Monroe served as President of the United States of America from 1817–1825.

He Is The Only Person In History To Hold Two Cabinet Positions At Once

During his political career, Monroe held a number of positions before becoming President in 1817. He served in the Virginia assembly, was a delegate to the Virginia Convention, and was a strong supporter of adding a Bill of Rights to the U.S. Constitution. He was Minister to France and Great Britain and governor of Virginia. But under his friend, President James Madison, Monroe was appointed as both Secretary of State (1811-1817) and Secretary of War (1814–1815) simultaneously. A first that hasn’t been repeated by any other politician since.

Monroe Had No Opponent in His 1820 Reelection

The election of 1820 was the last presidential contest in which the ticket ran virtually unopposed.  President James Monroe won all but one electoral vote, which went to John Quincy Adams.  The only other president elected without opposition had been George Washington in 1788 and 1792. William Plumer of New Hampshire, the one elector who voted against Monroe, did so because he thought Monroe was incompetent. He cast his ballot for John Quincy Adams. Later in the century, the fable arose that Plumer had cast his dissenting vote so that only George Washington would have the honor of unanimous election.

Monroe Died on The Fourth of July

Three Founding Fathers who were elected president died on July 4. Thomas Jefferson and John Adams both died on July 4, 1826, the 50th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence. Monroe died on July 4, 1831. Monroe was also the last president who was never photographed in his lifetime.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know that  he  crossed  the  DELAWARE  RIVER  before  WAHINGTON

dgrimm60

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phkrause

5 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Walt Disney

The pioneer of the animation industry and the creator of Mickey Mouse, Walter Elias Disney was born on this day in 1901. Here are 5 things you probably didn’t know about Walt Disney…  

He Was The Voice of Mickey Mouse

Mickey Mouse made his official debut in a 1928 short film titled “Steamboat Willie,” one of the first cartoons ever to use synchronized sound effects. When Mickey spoke for the first time, in 1929’s “The Karnival Kid” (his words were “Hot dog, hot dog”), Walt was unhappy with how the character sounded and went on to lend his own voice to the mouse until 1947’s “Mickey and the Beanstalk,” when he said he was too busy to continue doing so.

He Made Propaganda Films During World War II

During World War II, Disney’s studio made an Academy Award-nominated Donald Duck film that encouraged Americans to pay their taxes because money was needed to support the war effort. In addition, the studio produced training films for American soldiers. In 1943, it produced Donald Duck animated shorts that poked fun at the Nazis.

He Won More Academy Awards Than Anyone Else

Walt Disney won or received a total of twenty-six Academy Awards, and holds the record for most Academy Awards in history. He won a total of twenty-two competitive Academy Awards from a total of fifty-nine nominations, and also holds the records for most wins and most nominations for an individual in history. Most of his Oscars, won between 1932 and 1969, came in the category of Best Animated Short, including The Three Little Pigs, The Ugly Duckling and a posthumous win for Winnie the Pooh and the Blustery Day.

The Opening Day at Disneyland Started Out as a Disaster

Disneyland was originally planned as a small park but the idea grew, and 160 acres were purchased to build the attraction. Those 160 acres also included a secluded apartment for Disney to watch what was going on during construction. However, on opening day, too many people showed up, some of the rides broke down, a gas leak shut down Fantasyland, and some people even tried to get in by using counterfeit tickets. Despite the problems, Disneyland was a huge success and  more than 500,000 visitors had visited the park after about one month.

The Rumor That Disney Was Cryogenically Frozen Isn’t True

Disney died of lung cancer in Burbank on December 15, 1966, and the rumor that his body had been preserved cryogenically spread around the country. The truth is that Disney’s body was cremated and his ashes are interred in Glendale, California at Forest Lawn Cemetery. The first individual who chose to be cryogenically frozen was actually a university professor in 1967.

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