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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

 I  D did  not  know  the  story  about the  seagulls=====

dgrimm60

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phkrause

5 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Bruce Springsteen_2

On January 5, 1973, Bruce Springsteen's debut album, "Greetings From Asbury Park, N.J.," was released to the delight of music lovers all over the country. Here are 5 things you probably didn't know about “The Boss.”...

He Won Both an Oscar And a Golden Globe

Rock stars usually don’t win either of the above awards and actors seldom do, so these are major achievements for Springsteen. In 1994, he won ‘Best Song Oscar’ for “Streets of Philadelphia” from the movie Philadelphia, which starred Tom Hanks and Denzel Washington. He won the Golden Globe for the title song “The Wrestler,” the sports drama starring Mickey Rourke.

He Invaded Graceland to Meet Elvis

At the peak of his career, Elvis Presley had grown to be a favorite among many fans. Many people had tried to hop over the wall into his Graceland home to meet him, but very few are as famous as Bruce Springsteen. Bruce tried to make his way into the compound in 1976 to meet his hero, but was met with security who informed him that Elvis was not in town.

His Only #1 Track Occurred When Another Band Covered Him

At the top of his game, during the 70s and 80s, Springsteen was a force to be reckoned with. However, he never could quite clench the #1 spot on the Billboard Hot 100. His best performance on the chart was in 1984 when his hit track “Dancing In The Dark” clocked in at #2. Ironically, when Mannfed Mann’s Earth Band did a Springsteen cover of “Blinded By the Light,” which was the opening track of his debut album “Greeting From Ashbury Park, N.J,” it actually hit the number #1 spot in 1977. Until now, the song remains the biggest hit of the band. When he appeared on VH1’s Storytellers in 2005, Springsteen acknowledge how interesting it was that his only number one hit actually came from someone else’s version of his song.

Springsteen Was Turned Down for Service in the Military

Springsteen received his draft notice at age 19 and reported for his induction. However, he failed the physical because of a head injury he had suffered at age 17 in a motorcycle accident. He admitted to Rolling Stone magazine that he acted crazy at the induction and that, in addition to the previous head injury, caused the military to classify him as 4-F. That ensured he never served in Vietnam.

The Origin of His Famous Nickname

Most people tend to refer to Bruce Springsteen simply as “The Boss.” However, very few are familiar with the origin of this nickname, let alone the fact that he didn’t like the name in the first place and had to warm to it with time. Springsteen actually got the nickname during his club days, long before he gained the status of a big recording superstar. He was given the responsibility of collecting the band’s compensation from club owners and dispensing it among the other members of the band afterwards. He disliked the term “the Boss” due to his disgust for bosses, and while he had to get used to it sooner rather than later, the nickname never subsided.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did not know that because of  a  motor cycle head injury that he was classified as  4-F  

and never  served in  VIETNAM===

dgrimm60

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phkrause

5 Bizarre Facts About The Tonya Harding Debacle

On Jan 6, 1994, figure skater Nancy Kerrigan was clubbed on the right leg in an assault planned by the ex-husband of her rival, Tonya Harding. Here are bizarre facts of the case that shocked the figure skating community and the world...

The Attack Was Meant to Take Kerrigan Out of Competition

It was reported that Harding's ex contacted Harding's bodyguard Eckardt to plan to attack. The bodyguard reportedly paid hit man Shane Stant $6,500 to whack Kerrigan and take her out of competition. Kerrigan's doctor told The New York Times: "He was clearly trying to debilitate her."

Harding's Ex-Husband Turned Himself in to the FBI

Less than two weeks after the hit, an arrest warrant for Harding's ex-husband Jeff Gillooly was put out. Because of this, he decided to turn himself into the FBI. Shortly after, he implicated himself and four others—Tonya Harding, Shawn Eckhardt, Shane Stant and Derrick B. Smith. Gillooly ended up pleading guilty to racketeering. This left him with just a two-year sentence for the entire attack. Smith and Stant each got 18-month sentences for their involvement a few months later.

A Handwritten Note Lead To Harding Being Guilty

For a while, Harding’s involvement was still questionable. It was thought that she might have something to do with it, but it hadn’t been proven. Harding's ex told authorities that she called the Tony Kent Arena, where Kerrigan practiced in Michigan, to find out her schedule to help coordinate an attack. Harding denied his accusation when asked about it by the FBI. Gillooly even gave the FBI a scrap piece of paper with the name of the arena jotted down, saying Harding had written it. The FBI tested the handwriting and determined that the writing was Harding's. This was the evidence needed to confirm that Harding was involved.

Harding Was Banned From Professional Figure Skating

Harding was charged with hindering the investigation and was fined $160,000 and sentenced to probation for three years, while Gillooly and others served time. The US Figure Skating Association banned her for life and her win at the US Nationals in 1994 was revoked. Harding resurfaced in 2002 as a boxer on a show called “Celebrity Boxing.”

After The Scandal, Harding Tried Her Hand At Boxing

Harding's boxing career came about amid rumors that she was having financial difficulties and needed to fight in the ring to earn money. In 2002, Harding boxed against Paula Jones on the Fox Network Celebrity Boxing event, winning the fight. She thenmade her official women's professional boxing debut, losing a four-round split decision against Samantha Browning on the undercard of Mike Tyson vs. Clifford Etienne. Her boxing career was cut short by her asthma. Her overall record was 3 wins and 3 losses.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did not  know  that  se  tried  to  do a  boxing career ====

dgrimm60

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5 Facts You May Not Know About President George Washington

The first presidential election in the United States was held on January 7, 1789. George Washington won with a unanimous electoral vote and served for two terms. Here are five interesting facts about our first president that you may not know...

He Originally Served as an Officer Under The British

George Washington served under British Governor Robert Dinwiddie of Virginia and was sent by Dinwiddie to the Ohio Territory to deal with the encroachment of the French. After the French refused to leave, Dinwiddie once again sent Washington, now a lieutenant colonel, to confront them with a contingent of 160 soldiers. The ensuing skirmish caused Washington to surrender at Fort Necessity July 3, 1754. The event was a catalyst for the Seven Years War.

That Cherry Tree Story? It's a Myth

The story was invented by Parson Mason Weems who wrote a biography of George Washington shortly after Washington's death.  Since so little is known about Washington's childhood, Weems invented several anecdotes about Washington's early life to illustrate the origins of the heroic qualities Washington exhibited as an adult.  Introduced to countless schoolchildren as a moral tale in the McGuffey Reader textbook, the parable has become a persistent part of American mythology.

He Tried to Refuse The Presidential Salary

Washington decided to forgo the presidential paycheck during his time in office, but in the end he was forced to accept it because of its implications on presidential precedent. Article II of the Constitution states that the chief executive is required to be paid. This rule was established to ensure that less wealthy people could run for office without relying on bribery or corruption. Congress decided at the time that the president would be paid $25,000 a year. Presidents now are paid $400,000, which some, including Donald Trump, have pledged to donate to charity.

He Does Not Have a Middle Name

Many people are given three names at birth, but not Washington. Middle names weren't that common in the colonies until the start of the 19th century. According to his Mt. Vernon estate, only five of the first 20 US presidents had middle names.

He Created His Own Dog Breed

George Washington loved dogs, and he loved fox hunting, so it was only natural for him to want to breed the perfect foxhound. Because of his work, he is occasionally called the father of the American Foxhound, according to Animal Planet. He owned 36 of these pups, and gave them unusually mushy names like Sweet Lips, Tipsy, Venus, and True Love.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know that  WASHINGTON did  not have  a  middle name  and that only 5 of the  1st  20  

presidents  had  middle names====

dgrimm60

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5 Things You You Might Not Know About Elvis Presley_2

January 8, 1935, marks the birth of Elvis Presley, the man destined to become a legend in rock and roll.  Here are five shocking facts you probably didn't know about Elvis Presley... 

Elvis Had a Twin

Elvis was born on Jan. 8, 1935 at his parent’s small home in Mississippi … but he wasn’t the only one born that night. Jesse, who would have been Elvis’ older brother by 35 minutes, was stillborn, and buried the next day in an unmarked grave at the Priceville Cemetery in Tupelo. Throughout his career, Elvis would mention his twin from time to time, but most people never realized that there were almost two, identical Elvises in the world … I guess you could say, “There can be only one.”

Elvis Got His Name From His Father, but the Origin of "Elvis" Is Unknown

Elvis' first name came from his father's middle name (Vernon Elvis Presley), but the origin of the name itself is unknown. One theory holds that it's actually a rare last name derived from Elwes; another says that it's derived from Alviss, an Old Norse name taken from mythology meaning "all-wise." Yet another potential origin is that it's related to the names Elvin or Alvin, which come from Old English names like Ealdwine. It was also a variant of the name of an Irish saint from the 6th century and has been used as the anglicized form of Ailbhe, an Irish name used for both men and women.

Elvis Owned FDR’s Presidential Yacht “The Potomac”

This one seems like something that was really made up, but I can assure you — it wasn’t. After FDR’s death spelled the end of his “floating White House,” the boat went through a few other owners before none other than the King himself purchased the boat in 1964 for a whopping $50,000. The boat was only briefly owned by Elvis however, and he soon after donated it to St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital to raise money.Ironically, the boat would later wind up in the hands of some not-so patriotic peeps who used the Potomac to smuggle drugs into San Francisco. In 1980, the old, old wooden ship was seized and later restored and opened to the public as a historical piece.

Elvis' Only Grammy Wins Were for Gospel Performances

Elvis' musical career is a lot more varied than the rotation of hits you hear on oldies stations would lead you to believe. He was a huge gospel fan and was inducted into the Gospel Music Hall of Fame in 2001. Meanwhile, his only Grammy wins were for one live performance and two albums of gospel music. 

Elvis Traded His Expensive Watch for One Worth About $5

Members of Led Zeppelin were big Elvis fans and finally got to meet him in 1973 in Los Angeles, apparently leaving them speechless. John Paul Jones, bassist with the band, could not think of anything to say other than to compliment Elvis on how attractive his watch was. Elvis responded by giving Jones his $5,000 watch and trading it for Jones’ watch, which featured Mickey Mouse and sold for about $5.

ps:again 6 instead of 5??

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phkrause

5 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Apple

On January 9, 2007, Apple CEO Steve Jobs unveiled the iPhone, which propelled Apple into becoming one of the richest companies in the world.  Here are 5 fascinating facts you may not know about Apple…

There Were Actually Three Founders of the Company

It’s common knowledge that Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak built the first computer for Apple in a garage, but a third partner named Ronald Wayne had worked with Steve Jobs at Atari and helped to begin the company that eventually became Apple. Not only did he help develop the computer, he wrote its manual and even came up with Apple’s first logo. When he realized that if Apple didn’t work out, his own assets would be at risk, he decided to bail. He sold his share of the company to the Steves for $800. After the sale, Wayne had a lackluster career in electronics and now sells stamps and coins in a Nevada trailer park.

The Name "Apple" Was Chosen for Several Reasons

Steve Jobs had one practical reason for naming the Apple computer and one whimsical reason. The first was because he wanted the company to be listed in front of Atari in the telephone book. The second was because he thought the name Apple for a computer was playful, and he was a fruitarian at the time.

Apple's First Computer Had a Satanic Connection

The retail price of Apple’s first computer, the apple-1, was $666.66. When asked why he came up with that price, Woz (who claims to have had no idea that it had Biblical overtones) claimed that it was because he wanted a one-third markup over the wholesale price. But that would have made the price $666.67, it was pointed out to him. Woz then replied that straight sixes is easier to type, and that he has an affinity for repeating numbers. Woz being Woz, the questions stopped there.

The First Apple Logo Had a Picture of Isaac Newton

Isaac Newton, of course, was a mathematician and physicist who, legend has it, came up with the idea of the existence of gravity as he watched an apple fall from a tree. For the original logo for the company, Ronald Wayne, the co-founder of the company who bailed out early, depicted Newton seated underneath the apple tree where he made one of his most famous discoveries. One of Apple’s first computers that could be held in one hand also referenced the physicist when it was named the Apple Newton.

Apple Offered the First Digital Camera to the Public

Apple produced the first digital camera in color back in 1994, when existing models still used flashbulbs. It was named the Apple QuickTake 100 and was sold for around three years, from 1994 to 1997. Unfortunately, there was no preview screen, the camera only took eight pictures, and to view them, you had to plug it into your computer. Because the camera was expensive and the photo quality was poor, it never really caught on with the public.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that  he  once  owned  F.D.R. boat  after  FDR  died===

dgrimm60

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5 Facts You Should Know About John Rockefeller

On January 10, 1870, John D. Rockefeller and a handful of partners incorporated Standard Oil Company, he largest oil refinery in the world of its time. Here are 5 things you didn't know about America’s first billionaire...

Rockefeller Was the First American Billionaire

John D. Rockefeller was the first person in history to amass a personal fortunate of $1 billion. He didn’t stop there though; he continued to build on his already staggering wealth until it peaked at $1.5 billion after his retirement. When he died, in 1937, his net worth was estimated at around $1.4 billion, with the majority of the cash tied up in family trust funds. By the standards of the 21st century, that amounts to about $336 billion, which would earn Rockefeller a spot as the richest man in American history. That’s much higher net worth than Jeff Bezos, the owner of Amazon.

He Hired Substitute Soldiers to Avoid The Civil War

Rockefeller made it clear that he supported abolition but did not serve in the Civil War, and hired substitute soldiers to take his place, which was common in those days for people who had money. He said he wanted to serve in the military during the war but could not because his family was dependent on the money he made in his business. The business in question was commodities, from which Rockefeller made enough war profit that he was able to begin building his oil company.

He Enjoyed Handing Out Dimes To Children

Rockefeller carried around a bag of fresh, handing them out to everyone he met, especially children.  Rockefeller loved seeing the happiness the dime brought to children and counseled them to put their money into savings. The gift served as a token and a good-luck piece. It’s estimated that John D. gave away about $35,000 in dimes over his lifetime. He even gave dimes as a playful gesture to men like tire mogul Harvey Firestone and President Herbert Hoover. 

He Celebrated His Own Personal Holiday

.On September 26, 1855, a Cleveland merchant company, Hewitt and Tuttle, hired the teenaged Rockefeller as an assistant bookkeeper. From that year forward, the corporate tycoon celebrated “job day” every September 26 to commemorate his entrance into the business world, and he considered the date more important than his birthday. “All my future seemed to hinge on that day,” he reminisced later in his life, “and I often tremble when I ask myself the question: ‘What if I had not got the job?’”

Spelman College Bears The Maiden Name of Rockefeller’s Wife

In addition to giving millions to help found the University of Chicago and Rockefeller University, the industrialist in 1882 began to donate money to the Atlanta Baptist Female Seminary. Two years later, the African-American women’s school changed its name to Spelman Seminary in honor of his wife, Laura, and her parents, Harvey Buel and Lucy Henry Spelman, who were longtime abolitionists. In 1924, the institution was renamed Spelman College.

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5 Disturbing Facts You Didn't Know about Smoking

On Jan 11, 1964, the United States Surgeon General Luther Terry reported that cigarettes cause lung cancer. Here are 5 shocking things you may not know about tobacco and smoking...

Cigarettes Contain Thousands of Ingredients

There are more than 4,000 chemical ingredients in cigarettes, which can convert to over 200 different compound chemicals when burned. Some of those compound ingredients include ammonia (often used for cleaning), arsenic (an ingredient in rat poison), and benzene, a chemical compound which is found in gasoline and rubber cement. Other ingredients found in cigarettes include formaldehyde, which is used for embalming, and naphthalene, which is an ingredient used in mothballs.

Television Ads for Cigarettes Were Banned

A requirement for cigarette warning labels was signed into law by President Nixon in April 1970, and a ban was instituted on television and radio advertising at that time. The date for the advertising ban was extended by one day to January 1, 1971. This extension was granted to allow the cigarette companies to have one final day of television advertising for the televised football games held on New Year’s Day.

Smokers Die Many Years Earlier on Average

The CDC estimates that adult male smokers lose an average of 13.2 years of life and female smokers lose 14.5 years of life because of smoking. About 41,000 deaths of people who have been exposed to second-hand smoke occur annually, while 480,000 smokers themselves die. Combined, around 1,300 people in the United States die each day from smoking or from exposure to cigarette smoke.

Asbestos Was Used as an Ingredient in One Brand

Kent cigarettes with micronite filters, which were produced by Lorillard Tobacco, contained asbestos between 1952 and 1956. By the 1980s, hundreds of injury claims were filed by smokers and workers for the company. These plaintiffs had developed mesothelioma, a deadly cancer that arises many years or even decades after exposure to asbestos. In 2013, one former Kent smoker who developed the disease was awarded $3.5 million by a jury in Florida.

198,000 Cigarettes Are Consumed Every Second

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there were 37.8 million smokers in the United States in 2016. The 6.2 trillion cigarettes they consume each year works out to 198,186 cigarettes smoked per second. Cigarette smoking is responsible for more than 480,000 deaths per year in the United States, including more than 41,000 deaths resulting from secondhand smoke exposure. This is about one in five deaths annually, or 1,300 deaths every day.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that he  had  is own  holiday  for when  he  got  his  1st  job====

dgrimm60

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know that the  average death  for  men  is 13.2 years  earlier and for  women  are 14.5 years earlier====

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Probably Didn't Know About "All in the Family"

On January 12, 1971, the sitcom "All in the Family" premiered on CBS.  Here are 5 fascinating tidbits you might not have known about this groundbreaking show...

Norman Lear Based Archie Bunker on His Dad

In part, Norman Lear patterned Archie, the bigoted, angry father in the family, on his own father. Archie was also based in part on a similar character that appeared on the British show called “Till Death Do Us Part.” According to Lear, his father Herman called his wife names such as “dingbat” and frequently called his son “Meathead.” Lear said his father called him the “laziest and dumbest white kid I ever knew” and was narrow-minded and a racist just like the television character Archie Bunker.

The Show Originally Posted a Mature Audience Warning

Because the sitcom portrayed Archie Bunker as a loud-mouthed, prejudiced man who was vocal about his views, CBS expected a real backlash from the show’s viewers. CBS even went so far as to issue a disclaimer, saying that the show intended to make human frailties, concerns and prejudices amusing to show how absurd they were. The network also elected to hire additional phone operators to handle the expected angry phone calls, but the majority of viewers seemed to understand perfectly well what was going on.

The Mail and Calls About the Show Came as a Surprise

There were many letters and phone calls about the show sent to CBS. Most of those questions, however, were about the theme song instead of complaints about Archie. This is because viewers couldn’t understand the last line in the opening theme song, “Gee, our old LaSalle ran great.”  It was bothersome enough that Carroll O’Connor and Jean Stapleton recorded the opening theme again for season three, singing the lyrics more clearly.

It Was Difficult to Sell the Show to a Network

It took a while for the sitcom to be picked up by a television network. In the original pilot, the show was named “Justice for All,” and Carroll O’Connor’s name was Archie Justice with different actors playing the parts of daughter Gloria and her husband (Meathead). Producers of the show tried to interest the ABC network in the program, going so far as changing the name of the show, shooting a new pilot, and recasting some of the roles, but the network showed no interest in it. It wasn’t until CBS was approached that the sitcom was picked up and aired.

The Series Had More Spin-Offs Than Any Other TV sitcom

All In The Family was the origin of seven spin-offs, directly or indirectly. Maude with Bea Arthur as Edith’s cousin was first in 1972. Next came The Jeffersons, with Sherman Hemsley and Isabel Sanford as Bunker neighbors who “move on up to the East Side” of Manhattan. Next was the short-lived Gloria in 1982, with Struthers raising Joey after divorcing Mike. Then came 97 episodes of Archie Bunker’s Place. And finally, 704 Hauser brought us back to the Bunker house with a new family living there in 1994. If you include spin-offs of spin-offs like Good Times (from Maude) and Checking In (from The Jeffersons), “The Bunkerverse” includes more than 860 episodes.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that the  opening song  had to  be  rerecorded  so  people  could understand the  last  line===

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Didn't Know About The American Flag

On January 13, 1794, President George Washington approved a measure adding two stars and two stripes to the American flag, following the admission of Vermont and Kentucky to the union. Here are 5 surprising facts that you may not know about the flag of the United States of America...

The Current American Flag Was Designed by a Teenager

The modern American flag was designed by Robert G. Heft, a 17-year-old student. Because Hawaii and Alaska were being admitted to the Union in 1959, a design contest was held, which received more than 1,500 applicants. Heft’s design was chosen by President Dwight Eisenhower over all the rest. As a class history project to design a new flag, Heft submitted his design and received a B- for his project from his teacher. But after his flag was chosen, the teacher changed his grade to an A.

The Flag Probably Wasn’t Designed by Betsy Ross

While Betsy Ross is commonly given credit for the design of the American flag, evidence is lacking about whether she actually designed it. The only proof of her involvement in the design of the flag came from her own family when her grandson provided affidavits from his family members to the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. However, early Continental Congress records clearly name Francis Hopkinson as the designer of the flag.

We All Know The Flag Has 13 Stripes, But For 23 years, it Had 15

Up until 1795, the flag had one stripe and one star for each of the 13 states. After Vermont and Kentucky were added to the union in 1791 and 1792, respectively, the flag was due for its first major redesign in the country's history. Not only were two stars added to the blue field to represent the new states (a tradition that continues to this day), but designers also added two stripes.The 15-star, 15-stripe flag existed from 1795 until 1818, when five more states were added. Designers realized that adding more stripes would quickly become unwieldy, so they dropped the stripe count back to 13.

The Flag Was Nicknamed “Old Glory” by a Sea Captain

A sea captain named William Driver had been given an American flag by women in Salem, Massachusetts, his hometown. Once he saw it proudly flying onboard the mast of his ship in 1831, he nicknamed it Old Glory. The name caught on, and it became a nickname nationwide for the American flag.

The Television Show "Gilligan’s Island" Shows the American Flag at Half-Mast

In the 1960s television series “Gilligan's Island,” the American flag is shown in the distance flying at half-mast in the opening of the first season of the show. It turns out that the pilot episode was filmed on November 22, 1963. This was the same day as the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, so the flag had been lowered to reflect that day of mourning.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that the  present  day American Flag  was  designed  by  a

17 year old student  in  1959 due to  a  contest

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Didn't Know About The Today Show

On January 14th, 1952, The Today Show first premiered on NBC. The pioneer of the morning news show genre, and the fifth longest-running series on television, there's plenty of fascinating history behind it. Here are 5 things  you probably didn’t know about this long-running television program...

Actress Sigourney Weaver’s Dad Came up With the Idea for the Program

The president of NBC, Sylvester Weaver, Jr., who was also the father of actress Sigourney Weaver, is credited with coming up with the idea for “The Today Show.” However, the initial title of the program was “The Rise and Shine Revue.” During his time with the network, Weaver also started airing The Tonight Show and created Home and Wide Wide World. Years after leaving the network, he expressed his disgust with the direction the network had taken. He passed away in 2002.

It Was Many Years Before the Show Featured a Weatherman

The weather reports on "The Today Show" were originally delivered by the news anchor, and the first news host, Dave Garroway, used a chalkboard map to show areas with precipitation. The U.S. Weather Bureau supplied the information for these maps. Bob Ryan, an experienced meteorologist, took over reporting on the weather in 1978 and remained there until 1980.

A Long-Time Weatherman on the Show Played Ronald McDonald

Williard Scott, the show’s weatherman from 1980 until his retirement in 2010, initially portrayed Ronald McDonald on television from 1963 to 1966 as well as portraying Bozo the Clown and Commander Retro on WRC-TV in Washington, D.C. In addition, Scott narrated a weekly program for NASA titled “The Space Story.” After becoming semi-retired in 1996, Willard Scott was replaced by current "Today" weatherman Al Roker.

During the 1950s, the Show Had a Mascot

Because the show wasn’t delivering good ratings during its first season, producers decided to add a chimpanzee named J. Fred Muggs to the program to entice advertisers and increase viewership. It probably wasn’t an easy task since Muggs was known to be temperamental and difficult to handle. It was also rumored that anchor Dave Garroway was jealous and would spike Muggs’ orange juice so the chimp would act up.

The Show Used to Have A "Today Girl"

Between the years of 1952 to 1964, there would be a female anchor that was known as a Today girl. The very first Today girl was Estelle Parsons, who would go to play Beverly Harris on the hit sitcom Roseanne. The Today girl would report on such topics as the weather, fashion, and cover other light-fare stories. Other notable women who filled this role are Lee Meriwether, Florence Henderson, and Barbara Walters. Walters was the last woman to hold this position, as she was promoted to co-host with Hugh Downs in 1966 after being with the show for 2 years.

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PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that  the  show  added a  monkey  to  add  advertisers  to the  show  as  well  as  viewers====

dgrimm60

 

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5 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Wikipedia

On January 15, 2001, Wikipedia debuted and became a source that countless people turn to for information. As the sixth most-visited website in the world, Wikipedia has certainly changed how people interact with the World Wide Web. Here are five surprising facts about Wikipedia...

Its Birthday is Called “Wikipedia Day”

Jan. 15 is an important day for Wikipedia: its birthday. And since it went public on that day in 2001, Wikipedia recognizes it as “Wikipedia Day” and people celebrate both online and offline. In 2011, when Wikipedia turned 10, it created a page that listed meetups and celebrations that people could partake in all around the world to commemorate the special day.

It's More Accurate Than You Might Think

For years, college professors and newspaper editors have been telling their students and staff not to rely on Wikipedia for sources because of its open policy that anyone can edit or write. But how worried should they be? One 2015 study looked at several articles on different topics and found Wikipedia was about as accurate as Encyclopedia Britannica, whose content is all written by professionals. The study found 2.92 mistakes per article for Britannica and 3.86 for Wikipedia.

One-Third of Wikipedia Has Edits From One Person

You know that you can go in and make edits to pages that haven't been locked by Wikipedia's administrators, but chances are that you don't make too many edits overall -- unless you're Steven Pruitt, a man who has contributed over 35,000 separate pages on Wikipedia and made edits to fully a third of the site's English-language entries. He's done this as a volunteer, too, which he said made people think his hobby a bit strange -- until Time magazine named him one of the most influential people on the internet.

Congress Was Once Banned From Editing Wikipedia Articles

The ability to edit Wikipedia without having your work vetted by experts has also led to controversy as people have sabotaged pages or added incorrect information. One of the more bizarre episodes involved the U.S. Congress, whose members were actually banned at one point from editing Wikipedia pages. After noticing some zealous editing among congresspeople, Wikipedia created a bot called “Congress Edits” to help monitor and act as a “watch dog.” The bot would tweet out anonymous edits made by people with Congress IP addresses. However, this didn’t seem to completely fix the issue. So in July 2014, Wikipedia implemented a 10-day ban on anyone with a U.S. Congress IP address after it found many aggressively editing a variety of articles including conspiracy theories and the first moon landing.

Wikipedia’s official theme song is “Hotel Wikipedia”

As a spinoff from the famous “Hotel California” by The Eagles, Wikipedia’s official theme song is “Hotel Wikipedia.” Released in 2004, the song is made specifically for “wikipediaholics” and features lines like “There were pages begging for clean-up…” and “Edit page; you’ll do well…”

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that WIKIPEDIA has  is  own  birthday that  people  celebrate===

dgrimm60

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phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know About Prohibition_3

On January 16, 1919, prohibition took effect, which made it illegal in the United States to manufacture, transport or sell liquor. Here are 5 things you didn't know about the long dry spell in American history....

It Wasn’t Illegal to Drink Alcohol During Prohibition

The 18th Amendment only forbade the “manufacture, sale and transportation of intoxicating liquors”—not their consumption. By law, any wine, beer or spirits Americans had stashed away in January 1920 were theirs to keep and enjoy in the privacy of their homes. You just couldn't make it, transport it, or sell it. You could get medicinal alcohol, including whiskey and other hard liquors that your doctor prescribed, and sacramental wine was still allowed as well.

World War I Helped Push Prohibition Through

Prohibition was all but sealed by the time the United States entered World War I in 1917, but the conflict served as one of the last nails in the coffin of legalized alcohol. Dry advocates claimed the barley used to make beer could be better used as grain for bread for troops and people in Europe who suffered from food shortages. While Prohibition itself didn't start until after World War I, the argument was still persuasive enough to help get legislation passed. Anti-alcohol crusaders were often fueled by xenophobia, and the war allowed them to paint America’s largely German brewing industry as a threat.

Companies That Made Alcoholic Beverages Had to Get Inventive

Some small breweries kept producing their products secretly, but many had to repurpose their factories to stay in business. Anheuser Busch and Yeungling both switched to making ice cream, and Coors upped their production of ceramics and pottery. Most brewers sold malt syrup so that beer could be made at home, winemakers sold grape concentrate, and “near beer” with 0.5 percent alcohol kept their businesses going until the law’s repeal.

Prohibition Wasn’t Enforced Nationwide

 Federal agents were designated to enforce the new prohibition law, including Eliot Ness of The Untouchables fame. However, the individual states were supposed to enforce the law inside their borders. Many of the governors objected to the added cost and did not appropriate the funds to enforce the law. The state of Maryland, where everyone knew that crabs go best with a cold beer, refused to appropriate any money at all and never enacted a code to enforce prohibition.

Local Prohibition Laws Continued Until the 1960s.

Prohibition was repealed in 1933 after the passing and ratification of the 21st Amendment, but that ended only the nationwide enforcement of alcohol prohibition. It wasn't until 1966 that Mississippi, the last state to have a statewide Prohibition law, repealed theirs and allowed alcohol sales. But even that wasn't the end of alcohol prohibition. Many counties and cities had their own laws that either forbid the sale of alcohol completely or forbid it on certain days such as Sunday, and many states still have laws controlling the sale of alcohol or the types/percentages that can be sold. 

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that WW I   helped    push probation in to  place

dgrimm60

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