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5 Facts About the Oxford English Dictionary

On this day in 1884, the Oxford English Dictionary, considered the most comprehensive and accurate dictionary of the English language, was published. Today, the OED is the definitive authority on the meaning, pronunciation and history of over half a million word. Here are 5 surprising facts about the Oxford English Dictionary...

Volunteers Were Used to Compile the Oxford English Dictionary

It was the members of the Philological Society in London who first thought it was a good idea to publish a new and complete English dictionary back in 1857. Because it was such an enormous task, members of the public who were avid readers were asked to help with the project by sending along words and sentences that could provide insight into the words' definitions. When the first OED was published, the editors had been assisted by 2,000 volunteers.

It Took Decades to Finish the First Oxford English Dictionary

Although the Philological Society believed the dictionary could be completed in only 10 years, it took 70 years to finish it. By the time the first 27 years had passed, the editors had only reached the word "ant." Realizing they had seriously miscalculated the level of effort required, they started publishing unbound editions of the work-in-progress in 1884. The first volume that was completed wasn’t published until 1928, which was more than 70 years in the future from when they had first considered the idea.

Famous Author J.R.R. Tolkien Contributed to the OED

J.R.R. Tolkien, the author of “The Hobbit” and “Lord of the Rings,” was a contributor to the Oxford English Dictionary. He made his contributions by studying the origin of German words starting with W, such as the word "wampum." Tolkien was quoted as saying that he learned more during the many years he worked as a contributor to the OED than during any other two-year period in his life.

The OED’s Longest Entry Is for the Word "Set"

The three-letter word "set" is the most complex in the OED. It contains 430 different meanings and uses of the word as of the 1989 edition. The definition of this short word is an astounding 60,000 words long. Other words that have almost endless variations in which they are used include "go" (368), "take" (343) and "run" (396).

One Version of the Oxford English Dictionary Is Extremely Tiny

A magnifying glass came with one edition of the OED published in 1971 because the print was so tiny. One problem with the full OED was that the set of books was enormous and took up an entire bookshelf. As a result, Oxford University Press published a miniature version that was compressed so that nine pages would fit onto one. Despite the fact that users needed a magnifying glass to read the entries, it became a bestseller.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know that  it  took  70  years  to  finish  the  OED=====

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Didn't Know About The Super Bowl

It’s officially Super Bowl Sunday folks!  Today, the Kansas City Chiefs and the San Francisco 49ers will face off at Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens, Florida. Here are 5 crazy Super Bowl facts to keep you going until kickoff…

More Footballs Than You May Think Are Used in the Super Bowl.

Each of the teams that plays in the Super Bowl gets 108 footballs apiece for the Super Bowl game. Half of them are used in practices leading up to the big game, and the other half are used during the game itself. During a typical Super Bowl, 120 balls are used. (The additional ones are kicker footballs, used for all kicking plays.) 

Halftime Entertainers Don’t Get Paid

Many famous singers have appeared at the half-time shows at the Super Bowl, including Beyonce, Bruno Mars and Prince, but they were not paid anything to perform. But don’t feel too badly for them because these entertainers are getting the equivalent of millions of dollars in terms of exposure and publicity. Super Bowl viewer data has shown that the musical shows at halftime often have higher ratings than the games themselves. Today, Jennifer Lopez and Shakira will perform during the Pepsi Super Bowl LIV halftime show at Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens, Florida.

The Price of Super Bowl Tickets Has Risen Astronomically

In 1967, when the first Super Bowl was played between the Green Bay Packers and the Kansas City Chiefs, tickets only cost around $6. Apparently many people found that price too costly because 30,000 of the seats at this first Super Bowl were empty. In 2016, the average Super Bowl ticket cost was more than $4,700, which is still far too expensive for the average football fan.

The Balls Used in the Game Are Made in America

The footballs used in the actual game are made in Ada, Ohio, by the Wilson Football Factory, which produces over 700,000 footballs each year. The game balls are constructed of steer hide and are made by hand. The hides used are treated in Chicago at the Horween Factory and stamped with small Ws to show their authenticity.

It Wasn't Always "Super"

The Super Bowl wasn’t actually referred to as the Super Bowl until Super Bowl III. At the time, what we now know as Super Bowl I and II were just called the AFL-NFL World Championship Game. The third Super Bowl was officially given that name thanks to Lamar Hunt, the main founder of the American Football League and owner of the Kansas City Chiefs. According to legend, Hunt knew his daughter played with a toy called a "Super Ball" and it stuck in his head when the league was looking for a less cumbersome name for the event.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that each team  had  108  footballs  ====  I did  not  know that the  Half Time  entertainers  did  not  get  paid===

dgrimm60

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phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know About The Day The Music Died

February 3, 1959 is forever known as 'The Day the Music Died,' when an airplane carrying rock legends Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and J.P. 'The Big Bopper' Richardson crashed in a field in Fargo, North Dakota.  Here are 5 shocking facts you probably didn’t know about "The Day the Music Died."

The Musicians' Tour Bus Had Mechanical Problems

A combination of mechanical problems with their bus, the terrible weather and a long drive ahead to their next gig in Fargo, Minnesota, convinced singer Buddy Holly that chartering a plane to get there was a good idea. The three-seater Beechcraft Bonanza they hired crashed around five miles from Mason City, Iowa, killing the three musicians onboard. Because a flight plan had not been filed for the flight, their bodies weren’t discovered until the following morning.

Waylon Jennings Was Supposed to Be on The Plane

Waylon Jennings was only 22 years old and an up-and-coming entertainer when he was hired by Buddy Holly to play at the Winter Dance Party Tour at the Surf Ballroom. Waylon Jennings had originally intended to be on the plane that evening, but he gave up his seat to J.P. Richardson who was suffering from the flu. Holly and Jennings joked around prior to take-off, with Jennings jesting that he hoped the plane crashed. That remark would haunt Jennings for the rest of his life, causing him to feel responsible for the crash.

A Coin Toss Decided What Other Musician Died That Day

Ritchie Valens, popular for his hit song “La Bamba” asked band member Tommy Allsup for his seat on the plane. The two musicians agreed to toss a coin to decide. Bob Hale, a disc jockey with Mason City's KRIB-AM, was working the concert that night and flipped the coin in the ballroom's side-stage room shortly before the musicians departed for the airport. Valens won the coin toss for the seat on the flight and Tommy Allsup never got on the plane. Years later, Allsup opened a saloon and called the bar the Head's Up Saloon. This would remind him in the future how a simple coin toss had saved his life.

The Cause of the Plane Crash

Error on the part of the plane’s pilot, Roger Peterson, who also died in the accident, was determined to be a cause of the plane crash. The 21-year-old pilot had not undergone the instrument training that would have been needed when flying in bad weather. Unfortunately, Peterson was also unaware that a weather advisory had been issued before he took off with his passengers. The final investigation blamed the accident on pilot error and the poor weather conditions.

Singer Don McLean Recorded a Song that Mentions the Accident

The death of the three music legends was immortalized in the song “American Pie” by Don McLean. The song was released in 1971. The lyrics, “February made me shiver” and “The day the music died” are believed to refer to Buddy Holly, “The Big Bopper” and Ritchie Valens and the terrible accident that took their lives. The original recording of the song was chosen by the Library of Congress to be preserved in 2017 as being a significant contribution historically, culturally or artistically.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not know  that  WILLIAM JENNINGS  gave  up  his  seat  to  J. P. RICHARDSON

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Didn't Know About Facebook_2

On February 4, 2004, the social networking website Facebook was launched from a dormitory room at Harvard University. Since then, the network has grown to over 2.41 billion monthly active users, making it one of the most popular websites in the world. Here are 5 shocking facts you didn’t know about this social media giant...

Al Pacino Used to be The Company Logo

The first logo for Facebook was designed by a friend of Mark Zuckerberg’s named Andrew McCollum, who was Zuckerberg's classmate at Harvard University. The foggy looking face in the logo was actually that of actor Al Pacino. McCollum designed the logo using an image of the actor covered with ones and zeros, representing the ones and zeros that are used to store digital information.

Yahoo! Tried to Purchase Facebook in 2007

In 2007, Yahoo! reportedly offered to purchase Facebook for $1 billion. Apparently, Mark Zuckerberg was interested, however, he changed his mind about selling the social network site when the CEO of Yahoo! dropped the offer to only $850 million. It’s probably a good thing that Zuckerberg decided not to sell when Yahoo! made their offer because he’s now worth more than $68 billion.

There Are More Than Two Billion Members Who Are Active on Facebook

When you think about it, the number of people actively participating in Facebook social media is higher than the populations of China and India combined. Christiano Ronaldo, a footballer with the Portuguese team Juventus, is the most popular person on the social media site with almost 14 million followers. The most popular product on Facebook is Coca-Cola with 15,863,959 fans at last count. Of the more than two billion active Facebook users, nearly a billion and a half log into Facebook every day.

Facebook Is Blue for a Reason

Mark Zuckerberg is red-green colorblind, but he can see the color blue clearly, so that was the color he chose for the branding of his social media site. Zuckerberg reportedly discovered that he was colorblind by taking an online test. He chose blue as the main color for Facebook because it was the richest color that he could see. The fact that psychologists say that people associate blue with a sense of trust and security doesn't hurt. 

Mark Zuckerberg Chose the Name for the “Like” Button

Facebook’s ‘Like’ button used to be the ‘Awesome’ button. Facebook engineer Andrew Bosworth said that he and other engineers were enthusiastic about the “Awesome” button, but that the idea was ultimately vetoed by Zuckerberg in 2007. The site eventually settled on the “Like” button, a decision that Bosworth said was met with a decidedly lukewarm reception.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that  the   many  active  users that  use  face  book  are  more

than the  population  of  China  and  India combine====

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Didn't Know About Phoenix Arizona

On February 25, 1881, Phoenix, Arizona, was incorporated by the 11th Territorial Legislature. Phoenix is both the capital of Arizona and its most populated city, with around 1.6 million inhabitants. Here are 5 surprising facts about the city known as the “Valley of the Sun.”

Phoenix Is The Most-Populated State Capital in the U.S.

Phoenix is easily the most-populated state capital. At almost 1.5 million people, Phoenix is much larger than the second-biggest capital, Indianapolis, which is home to about 850,000 people.

It Gets Really Hot in Phoenix

Phoenix holds the number one spot in the nation for the number of days where the temperature in a major U.S. city is above 100-degrees Fahrenheit. In fact, the average high temperature in Phoenix in July is 106.1 Fahrenheit. The highest temperature in Phoenix ever recorded was in a balmy June in 1990 when it reached a scorching 122-degrees Fahrenheit. Snowfall in the city is a rare event indeed, with the record being only .04 inches back in 1939.

Phoenix Received Its Name From an English Lord

Phillip Darrell Duppa was a member of the committee chosen to select the name of the new town. Duppa, who preferred to be called Lord Duppa, spoke seven languages and had royal relatives. After the discovery of irrigation canals from a prehistoric period when the Hohokam lived on the land, Duppa made an eloquent argument that the town should be named Phoenix after the mythological bird that arose from ashes. It was certainly better than suggestions made by other committee members — which included Stonewall and Pumpkinville.

Wild Love Birds Can Be Seen There

They were first seen in 1987, and, of course, are popular pets for bird lovers. In 2010, Phoenix was thought to have a wild lovebird population of around 950, which may be borne from a pair of birds that were released or escaped and bred like crazy.

The “Sunshine State” is a More Accurate Nickname for Arizona Than Florida.

Meteorological statistics don’t lie. Arizona is the sunniest state in the country. (Florida comes in fifth.) Yuma is sunny 90% of the time, and Phoenix and Tucson tie at 85%. No city in Florida even makes the top ten.

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5 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Cuba

On February 7, 1962, the United States imposed a trade embargo on Cuba.  The ensuing embargo effectively restricted all trade between Cuba and the United States. Here are 5 things you didn't know about Cuba...

Cubans Were Only Recently Allowed to Buy New Cars

Cuba’s cars are world famous, and it’s a popular tourist attraction to go for a ride in these old American cars. Many of them are from the ’50s before the import ban, and because of the import ban, Cubans couldn’t get spare parts to their cars.  In 2014, Cubans were finally able to buy new cars without government permission. Unfortunately, the roll-out of the new car-buying world was greeted with disgust as dealers offered cars at a 400 percent markup.

Coca Cola is Officially Not Sold in Cuba

Only two countries in the world are known for banning Coca Cola, and that’s Cuba and North Korea. Coca-Cola moved out of Cuba in the early 1960s and has never returned. Currently, the United States holds a financial, economic, and commercial embargo against the Republic of Cuba. Therefore, no American firm including Coca-Cola is allowed to trade with Cuba.

Until 2008, Cubans Were Not Allowed to Own Cell Phones

The same goes for computers. Since this law changed, many Cubans have gotten either a cell phone or laptop. Especially since the Wi-Fi hotspots came in 2015. 

Most Restaurants Are Owned by The Government

There are also privately owned restaurants, called Paladares. However, these are quite rare, and most of the restaurants are owned and operated by the government.

Cuba Banned Christmas for 30 Years.

Yep. Fidel Castro declared Cuba an atheist country when he came to power and didn't even allow the day off. Given that most Cubans were (and are) Catholic, that didn't sit well. When Castro finally unbanned Christmas and allowed the Pope to visit the country, citizens rushed out to buy Christmas items even though it was already after Christmas.

The Average Cuban Earns Roughly $20 per Month in Salary

Although things are slowly developing and becoming more modern, the average Cuban still earns roughly $20 per month – that’s less than 1 dollar a day. 

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5 Surprising Facts You Didn't Know About AOL

In 2011, AOL, Inc., announced that it would buy the Huffington Post for a whopping $315 million. AOL's fortunes have changed over the years, but the company continues to new ways to stay visible. Here are 5 surprising facts you probably didn't know about AOL...

The Man Who Recorded the Iconic "You've Got Mail" Was Paid Only $200.

Elwood Edwards is the man behind one of the most famous second-and-a-half voice snippets ever recorded: the "You've Got Mail!" notification that millions of AOL users heard for years. What's interesting is that not only did Edwards' wife volunteer his voice to then-CEO Steve Case, but Edwards recorded the line on a cassette deck. The folks at AOL digitized it to add to their software. He was paid only $200, and not given any royalties. In fact, as of 2016, he was working as an Uber driver.

They Were Originally Named "Quantum Computer Services"

AOL was founded in 1985 as Quantum Computer Services, an online services company by Jim Kimsey from the remnants of Control Video Corporation. In 1991, Quantum was renamed America Online. AOL became one of the early pioneers of the Internet, providing dial-up service to over 30 million members worldwide. In 2001, at the height of its popularity, it purchased the media conglomerate Time Warner in the largest merger in U.S. history. AOL rapidly declined thereafter, partly due to the decline of dial-up and rise of broadband.

AOL Still Has Millions of Dial-Up Users

Despite all its issues, AOL is still alive and kicking. A couple of million people still use the company's dial-up services and many more have aol.com email addresses. Dial-up allows people with limited broadband/DSL/wireless access to get online because all they need is a working phone line, and dial-up services are much cheaper, too. As for the email users, while the address is seen as a sign of refusing to keep up with the times, the reality is that, after 20 or 30 years with the same email address, switching to a new one can be a major hassle.

At One Point AOL Made Half of All CDs Produced

During the 1990s, it seemed like a signup CD for AOL came in the mail every other day. Ever wonder exactly how many discs the company produced? TechCrunch, acquired by AOL in 2010, wanted to know, and tried to get quotes from Case and other execs from that era. The most shocking piece of info was given to TechCrunch by a former AOL marketing chief: "At one point, 50 percent of the CDs produced worldwide had an AOL logo on it. We were logging in new subscribers at the rate of one every six seconds."

AOL CDs Were Tested for the Effects of Freezing and Thawing -- Because They Were Packaged With Meat.

AOL CDs showed up frequently in the mail, in magazine inserts, attached to cereal boxes, and more. They were also, at one point, included with frozen Omaha steaks, which meant that the CDs had to be tested for resilience after freezing and thawing. AOL CDs were created to give people a way to connect to the internet at a time when not many people were online as much as they are now, and many AOL CDs are now collector's items.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I  did  not  know  how  the company  got it's  name===I did  not  know  hoe the  phrase   " You 've Got  Mail "got started===

dgrimm60

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6 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Pizza

February 9 is National Pizza Day. Whether it is thin crust, Chicago-style, deep dish or anything in between, pizza is an American favorite. Here are 5 facts you probably didn't know about one of America’s favorite foods...

Lombardi’s Was The First Pizzeria In The U.S.

In 1905, the first pizza shop in the country opened in New York. It was called Lombardi’s, named after the Italian immigrant who started it, Gennaro Lombardi. Today, you can still find Lombardi’s pizzeria in lower Manhattan just down the block from where the original shop was located.

Hawaiian Pizza Was Actually Created In Canada

Despite the name, Hawaiian pizza wasn’t actually the creation of a Hawaiian chef. Instead, it was invented by a Canadian cook who started serving pineapple-topped pie in the 1960s. These days, Hawaiian pizza typically consists of pineapple and either bacon or ham.

Pizza Hut Concocted A Pizza-Scented Perfume

Love the smell of pizza? You may have been among the target audience for Pizza Hut Canada’s limited-edition perfume that they released in 2012. According to the press release, the perfume smelled like “freshly baked, hand-tossed dough.”

The Most Expensive Pizza in The World is $12,000

If you happen to have an extra $12,000 laying around, we suggest you order the Pizza Louis XIII from chef Renato Viola. The entire process happens at your house and includes the presence of a sommelier, a sous chef and chef Viola himself. Extravagant toppings for the pizza include three types of caviar, red prawns, Mediterranean lobster and sea cicada. The pizza comes with Remy Martin Cognac and Champagne Krug Clos du Mesnil. Oh, and did we mention the pie isn’t even eight inches in diameter?

The World’s Biggest Pizza Weighed More Than 13 Tons

According to the “Guinness Book of World Records,” the biggest round pizza was made on December 8, 1990, in Norwood, South Africa. This gastronomical delight was more than 122 feet in diameter and weighed a whopping 26,883 pounds. It was topped with 1,763 pounds of mushrooms and 3,960 pounds of cheese, not counting the chopped tomatoes and tomato puree.

In Ohio, There’s A Pizza ATM

Although ATMs that dispense pizzas have existed in Europe for many years, the first pizza ATM in the U.S. debuted in 2016. Located at Xavier University in Ohio, the machine holds 70 medium-sized pizzas. Customers can purchase one through a touchscreen, and the machine will heat up and dispense the pizza through a slot.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that  the  HAWAIIAN PIZZIA was  created in  CANADA===

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Didn't Know About Shirley Temple_2

On February 10, 2014, Shirley Temple died at age 85. She had a long career as one of the most popular movie stars during the Great Depression and as a diplomat in later life. Here are 5  things you probably didn’t know about Shirley Temple...

She Was the Youngest Performer to Ever Win an Oscar

The Juvenile Oscar was established in 1935 to recognize performers under the age of 18 who deserved to win but would have trouble competing with their adult counterparts. Shirley Temple won the first of these awards in 1935 at age six for her role in Bright Eyes. The trophy itself was a miniature of the Oscar at seven inches tall, and was discontinued in after 1961 when it was last presented to Hayley Mills for her starring role in Pollyanna.

She Apparently Hated Her Drink

A Shirley Temple is a non-alcoholic mixed drink traditionally made with ginger ale and a splash of grenadine, garnished with a maraschino cherry. Temple herself was not a fan of the drink, as she told NPR in a 1986 interview: "The saccharine sweet, icky drink? Yes, well... those were created in the probably middle 1930s by the Brown Derby Restaurant in Hollywood and I had nothing to do with it. But, all over the world, I am served that. People think it's funny. I hate them. Too sweet!" In 1988 Temple brought a lawsuit to prevent a bottled soda version using her name from happening.

Temple Was Considered for the Part of Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz

Temple’s name was brought up a number of times while The Wizard of Oz casting was ongoing. However, she was contracted to 20th Century Fox. The new blockbuster movie in color was being made by Metro Goldwyn Mayer, and Temple’s employer would not release her from her contract. In any event, it was obvious that Judy Garland had a much more impressive singing voice, and it was she who was eventually cast to play Dorothy Gale in the movie.

Fox Studios Paid the Child an Amazing Salary for That Era

In 1934, Shirley Temple signed on to work for 20th Century Fox Studios after appearing in minor films. She was paid $150 a week, which was an astronomical sum equal to about $3,000 these days. She had to pay for her tap shoes herself, however. After producing such successes as Curly Top, Captain January and Poor Little Rich Girl, Temple’s salary was hiked to an astounding $1,000 per week.

She Knew a Thing or Two About Diplomacy

In 1969, President Richard M. Nixon appointed her a U.S. delegate to the United Nations. Five years later, she served as U.S. Ambassador to Ghana, and from 1989 to 1992 as President George H.W. Bush’s U.S. Ambassador to Czechoslovakia. Under the leadership of President Gerald R. Ford, she became the first woman named U.S. Chief of Protocol. 

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that  was the  1st  to  receive  a  Juvenile Oscar  in  1935====and the  Juvenile  Oscar  stopped  in  1961===

dgrimm60

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6 Things You Never Knew About Whitney Houston

On this day in 2012, singer and actress Whitney Houston was found dead in in the bathtub of her suite at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, California. Here are 5 things you probably didn’t know about Whitney Houston…

She Was a Successful Fashion Model

Houston was just 16 years old when she started a modeling career. Her photos appeared in magazines such as Glamour, Mademoiselle, Seventeen, and Cosmopolitan. She holds the distinction of being one of the first African American woman to appear on the cover of Seventeen magazine. She also starred in TV commercials for Dr. Pepper and Coca-Cola, and before she had a record deal she turned down the opportunity to star as Sondra Huxtable on "The Cosby Show".

She Had Music In Her Blood

Her mother, Cissy Houston, was a backup singer for the likes of Elvis Presley, Mahalia Jackson, Luther Vandross and Aretha Franklin. Whitney Houston also grew up wanting to follow in the footsteps of her cousin, pop star Dionne Warwick, and her godmother, Aretha Franklin. 

Houston Sang Background for Chaka Khan

In 1978, Houston was a girl of 14 when she, along with her mother Cissy Houston sang backup for Chaka Khan’s iconic hit “I’m Every Woman.” In 1993, Houston released her own version of the song, which reached the number four spot on Billboard's charts. In the song, she yells “Chaka” several times toward the end. The song also appears in her 1992 movie “The Bodyguard.”

She Holds the Record for the Best-Selling Soundtrack

The soundtrack that has sold the most copies worldwide is Houston’s “The Bodyguard: Original Soundtrack Album” with more than 45 million copies sold. The album featured an impressive five hit songs, including “I Will Always Love You,”  “I’m Every Woman” and “Run to You.” The songs "I Have Nothing" and "Run to You" from the album were nominated as Best Original Song at the 1993 Academy Awards.

She is The Most Awarded Female Recording Artist

Houston is the most awarded female recording artist of all time, according to the Guinness Book of World Records. Houston’s awards include: 2 Emmy Awards, 6 Grammy Awards, 30 Billboard Music Awards, 22 American Music Awards.  Houston is also the only artist to chart seven consecutive #1 Billboard Hot 100 hits (“Saving All My Love for You”, “How Will I Know”, “Greatest Love of All”, “I Wanna Dance with Somebody”, “Didn’t We Almost Have It All”, “So Emotional”, and “Where Do Broken Hearts Go”). 

Her Daughter’s Body Was Found Almost the Same Way

Whitney Houston drowned in a bathtub in a Beverly Hills hotel at age 48, which resulted from long-term cocaine abuse and heart disease. Bobbi Kristina Brown, 21, Houston’s daughter with Bobby Brown, was found in her townhouse bathtub on January 31, 2015, and the accident was determined to be influenced by drug intoxication. The younger Brown lingered in a coma for almost six months before she died on July 26, 2015, as the result of lobar pneumonia.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I  did  not  know  that  she  was  a  model at the age  of  16  for  4 different  magazines====

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Didn't Know About Abraham Lincoln_3

On February 12, 1809, Abraham Lincoln was born in a one-room log cabin in Hodgenville, Kentucky. To celebrate the anniversary of Lincoln's birth, here are 5 things you probably didn't know about one of America’s most admired presidents...

The Secret Service Was Created the Same Day as Lincoln’s Assassination

Mere hours before he was assassinated at Ford’s Theater, Lincoln signed the legislation that created the Secret Service. It wouldn’t have stopped the assassination anyway because the Secret Service was originally set up to combat the counterfeiting of currency. Secret Service protection wasn’t assigned to guard the president until after the death of President William McKinley in 1901.

He is The Only U.S. President to Receive a Patent

The U.S. Patent Office holds a patent obtained by Abraham Lincoln in 1849, making him the only person holding the highest office in the land with this distinction. On May 22, 1849, Abraham Lincoln received Patent No. 6469 for a device to lift boats over shoals, an invention which was never manufactured. Part of his patent application reads, "Be it known that I, Abraham Lincoln, of Springfield, in the county of Sangamon, in the state of Illinois, have invented a new and improved manner of combining adjustable buoyant air chambers with a steam boat or other vessel for the purpose of enabling their draught of water to be readily lessened to enable them to pass over bars, or through shallow water, without discharging their cargoes..." 

John Wilkes Booth’s Brother Saved The Life of Lincoln’s Son

Several months before Lincoln was assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, the president’s son was standing on the platform at a train station in New Jersey when he fell off the platform as a train was approaching. The person who reached forward and pulled the boy to safety was actor Edwin Booth, the brother of Lincoln’s assassin. Coincidentally, the day of the funeral for Edwin Booth, June 9, 1893, was the same day the third floor of Ford’s Theater collapsed, killing 22 federal workers.

Grave Robbers Tried to Steal Lincoln’s Body

A gang of counterfeiters led by James "Big Jim" Kennally in Chicago tried to steal Lincoln’s body in 1876 with the thought of holding it for $200,000 ransom and getting a cohort of theirs released from prison. However, they made the mistake of hiring Lewis Swegles, a supposed grave robber who turned out to be a paid informer for the Secret Service. Additionally, the counterfeiters couldn’t have moved the coffin anyway because it was partially made of lead and weighed around 500 pounds. Lincoln’s body was moved to a secret hiding place and eventually placed inside a steel cage and buried safely underneath tons of concrete at Oak Ridge Cemetery.

Lincoln Never Slept in the Lincoln Bedroom

What is now the Lincoln bedroom in the White House served as Lincoln’s office during his term as president, not as his bedroom. It was here that he signed the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863. However, the furniture in the room that became known as the Lincoln bedroom was purchased in 1861 by Mary Todd Lincoln, including the eight-foot by nine-foot rosewood bed.

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5 Things You Didn't Know About King Henry VIII_2

On February 13, 1542, Catherine Howard, the fifth wife of King Henry VIII, was executed for treason after supposedly committing adultery with her cousin. Here are 5 crazy facts you probably didn’t know about the infamous life of Henry VIII...

Henry Ordered as Many as 72,000 Executions During His Reign

Henry VIII was by far the bloodiest Tudor ruler, ordering tens of thousands of executions during the tumult of the English Reformation. (Henry’s most famous victims included his former top advisor Sir Thomas More, as well as two of Henry’s six queens—Anne Boleyn and Catherine Howard). The infamous Anne Boleyn, his second wife, was executed about three years into her marriage to Henry. Henry VIII's fifth wife, Catherine Howard, didn’t fare well either, being executed after only around two years of married life.

He Ended Up Enormous Due to His Extreme Diet

In his younger years, Henry VIII was popular with the ladies because of his striking good looks, his height of 6’3” and his flaming red hair. Of course, all the power and money he had didn’t hurt any either. In later years, however, he became enormously overweight, probably because he regularly ate 13-course meals and downed some 70 pints of ale each week.

Henry VIII Might Have Had McLeod Syndrome

Henry VIII was known for his horrible, unpredictable temper, especially as he grew older. He holds the record among British monarchs for beheading people, and many of his victims were relatives and close friends. Theorists suggest he may have had McLeod syndrome, a genetic disorder whose symptoms include behavioral changes and lack of self-restraint.

He Imposed a Beard Tax

Henry VIII was famous for his beard, but most people don’t know that he imposed a tax on them in 1535. The king demanded that any man who wore a beard pay a tax on it, with the amount of the tax determined by his social status. Naturally, many wealthy Brits deliberately grew beards to advertise their wealth and high social stature.

He Was The First English King to be Called “Your Majesty”

Before Henry VIII, English kings were addressed as “Your Grace” or “Your Highness.” After the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V began being called “Majesty” in 1519, Henry VIII, not to be outdone, adopted the term for himself.

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that  he  was the only  president  to  receive  a patent on May  22  1849=====

dgrimm60

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dgrimm60

PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that  he  had 72,000  executions  during  his reign ====

dgrimm60

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phkrause

5 Things You Didn't Know About Valentines Day

It's February 14th, and that means it's Valentine's Day. So celebrate a day of chocolate, love and flowers with these 5 interesting facts about Valentine’s Day...

Chaucer Might Have Been the Inventor of Valentine’s Day

Geoffrey Chaucer, the English poet from medieval times, wrote a poem called “Parliament of Foules” around the year 1382. In the poem, he links love with the feast day of St. Valentine and talks about how humans and birds look for a mate. Chaucer wrote the poem to celebrate the engagement anniversary of King Richard II to Anne of Bohemia.

The First Valentine Was Written From a Prison

History’s first valentine was written in perhaps one of the most unromantic places conceivable: a prison. Charles, Duke of Orleans wrote the love letter to his second wife at the age of 21 while captured at the Battle of Agincourt. As a prisoner for more than 20 years, he would never see his valentine’s reaction to the poem he penned to her in the early 15th century. It is the oldest "valentine" known and is kept in London at the British Library.

Millions of Greeting Cards Are Purchased Every Year

Today, millions of greeting cards are purchased every year. We're talking 144 million greeting cards being exchanged industry-wide every year for Valentine's Day in the U.S. alone, according to Hallmark. Oddly enough, Valentine's Day ranks second in the holidays with the highest rank of greeting cards sold, ranking after Christmas.

It's Not Just For Humans

People really do love their pets, because according to the National Retail Federation, 27% of people celebrating Valentine's Day in 2020 say they are also buying gifts for their pets. Spending on Valentine's Day gifts for pets has also grown significantly, going from $450 million in 2010 to more than $1.7 billion.

To Wear Your Heart on Your Sleeve Has Real Meaning

The term “wearing your heart on your sleeve” may have origins in picking a valentine.  During the Middle Ages, single women and men drew names, and the name of the person drawn would be their valentine. They advertised their valentine by pinning the name on their sleeve for a week. Today, the expression "wearing one's heart on their sleeve" has come to mean openly showing feelings and emotions. 

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