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5 Things You Didn't Know About The Korean War

On June 27, 1950, President Harry S. Truman ordered U.S. air and naval forces to South Korea to aid the democratic nation in repulsing an invasion by communist North Korea. Here are five things you didn’t know about the Korean War...

Korea Was Split in Half After World War II

Japan ruled over Korea from 1905 until the end of World War II, after which the Soviet Union occupied the northern half of the peninsula and the United States occupied the south.It was originally intended that Korea would remain one country, but the Soviets refused to participate in the elections held in 1947. Syngman Rhee was elected the president of South Korea, and Kim Il-Sung controlled the north. But both wanted to control the entire peninsula so border skirmishes killed thousands. Both Kim and Rhee wanted to unify Korea under their rule and initiated border skirmishes that left thousands dead.

Congress Didn’t Declare War Against North Korea

North Korea attempted to invade the south on June 25, 1950, with permission from Joseph Stalin, the Soviet dictator. Two days later, North Korean troops had reached Seoul, the capital of South Korea, and President Harry Truman ordered the U.S. Air Force and Navy into action, approving ground troops a few days later. Truman never asked Congress to formally declare war, and this has not been done for further military actions since World War II.

The Korean War Goes By Many Names

In the United States, we call it the Korean War (and sometimes the Forgotten War). North Korea calls it the Fatherland Liberation War. In South Korea, it’s called Six-Two-Five, after the day it started. China’s subtle name for the conflict is the War to Resist U.S. Aggression and Aid Korea.

A Horse Was Honored as a Korean War Hero

Sergeant Reckless was a chestnut-colored mare that was bought by the Marines to move ammo and supplies across rough terrain. She also evacuated wounded men away from the battlefield. She was wounded twice and awarded several Purple Hearts as well as a Good Conduct Medal, among others. A statue dedicated to her is displayed in Quantico, Virginia, at the National Museum of the Marine Corps and another was erected in Lexington, Kentucky, at the Kentucky Horse Park.

The Korean War Never Ended

The July 1953 armistice may have ended the war, but it has not led to a peace treaty between North and South Korea. The two sides are still separated by a heavily fortified 2.5-mile-wide demilitarized zone, and tensions remain high, particularly over the North’s fledgling nuclear weapons program. Though North Korea has pronounced the armistice nullified on several occasions, the United Nations holds that such action cannot be taken unilaterally.

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PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that  the  war  had  many names  from different  countries====

dgrimm60

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10 Animals Removed From The Endangered Species List

On June 28, 2007, the Bald Eagle was removed from the list of threatened species after being under federal protection since 1940. Here are 10 other amazing animals that have been removed from the endangered species list...

Panda Bear

In 2016, the giant panda bear — long the symbol of wildlife conservation, via the World Wildlife Fund — was officially bumped off the endangered list, as the population of giant pandas living in the wild jumped to just over 1,800.

Yellowstone Grizzly Bears

In a controversial move, the Yellowstone grizzly lost its endangered classification in 2017, as the bears now number in the 700s. Activists worry that the loss of the protections afforded to the grizzly under the Endangered Species Act put it once again at risk of dwindling in numbers (there were fewer than 200 of the bears in the mid-20th century).

Gray Wolf

Gray wolves almost went extinct in the lower 48 states due to hunting. However, they were placed under protection in the 1960s after they disappeared from all areas of the country except a part of Michigan and Minnesota. They were reintroduced into Idaho and Yellowstone National Park, and recovering populations exist throughout the west.

Snow Leopards

In 2017, the snow leopard was upgraded from the endangered list, where it was placed in 1972, to vulnerable, although animals in this category still face a high risk of going extinct in the wild. Estimates by the Snow Leopard Trust are that there are fewer than 100 in the wild, and the population could be 40. The beautiful white cat with black spots lives in subalpine and alpine regions where it blends in with the snow.

Southern White Rhinoceros

The Southern white rhino is known for its square lip and neared extinction because of poaching of the animal’s horn. It is now listed as near-threatened due to poaching and habitat loss and is found in Kenya, Namibia, South Africa, and Zimbabwe. The last of the northern white rhinos died in 2018 after a valiant attempt to save them.

Chatham Petrel

There are only about 2,000 of these Pacific seabirds left in the wild, but their numbers have improved enough that they were lowered from the endangered list to vulnerable. This interesting bird, which lives in a burrow and lays only one egg, is endemic to New Zealand and the Chatham Islands. Conservation efforts in New Zealand, including protection from predators, have been successful in improving the breeding of these interesting sea birds.

Arabian Oryx

In 1972, the last wild Arabian oryx was shot and killed in Oman. Native to the steppe and desert areas of the Arabian Peninsula, a massive effort was undertaken to breed captive animals and reintroduce them into the wild. This horned antelope with a distinctive shoulder bump is the first to have been returned to vulnerable status from its previous classification as extinct in the wild.

Gray Whale

Gray whales that live in the Western North Pacific were once thought to be extinct, while those who live in the Eastern North Pacific are doing well. It is believed that around 130 of the Western gray whales along the Western North Pacific are in existence, which makes this group still critically endangered. The Eastern gray whales are believed to have recovered so well they are at near capacity.

Steller Sea Lion

The Steller sea lion is currently listed as near-threatened and is the largest of the eared seals, attaining lengths of eleven feet and weighing more than a ton. They range from California coastal waters to the coast of Japan. Although severe overfishing caused a steep decline in their numbers, the population has increased, and they were removed in 2013 from the endangered list.

Northern Brown Kiwi

The flightless northern brown Kiwi with its spiky feathers may be odd-looking, but it deserves love too. These small omnivores live only in New Zealand on the North Island. The Northern brown and rowi, two species that represent the national bird of New Zealand, have been upgraded to vulnerable because of dedicated conservation efforts.

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PHKRAUSE

I did  not know  about  most  of  these  being  taking off  of  the  endangered  species list=====

dgrimm60

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5 Fascinating Facts You Didn't Know About The iPhone

On June 29, 2007, the first Apple iPhone went on sale. Nobody, not even Apple, could predict how the iPhone would change the way we look at phones forever.  Here are 5 fascinating facts about the phone that captivated the country....

Steve Jobs Made His First iPhone Call to Prank Starbucks

When Steve Jobs introduced his first iPhone, he apparently used it to play a prank in public. He made a phone call to a Starbucks that was nearby and ordered 4,000 lattes. As the audience laughed, he told the astonished person at Starbucks that he was just kidding and had the wrong number.

Apple’s iPhone Wasn’t The First iPhone

Initially, Cisco owned the 'iPhone' trademark. That didn't stop Apple from calling its new device the iPhone. After its January 2007 unveiling, Apple and Cisco eventually settled their dispute with both companies promising to collaborate together on products in the future. The fruits of that cooperation, if it ever even took place, have never been seen.

The Default Time in iPhone Ads is Always Set to 9:41

If you pay close attention, you will find that all iPhone advertisements show the device at a time set to 9:41. This is no coincidence. Former Apple executive Scott Forstall once explained, "We design the (product launch) keynotes so that the big reveal of the product happens around 40 minutes into the presentation. When the big image of the product appears on screen, we want the time shown to be close to the actual time on the audience's watches. But we know we won't hit 40 minutes exactly." As a point of interest, the default display times on iPhones used to be 9:42.

The Original iPhone Project Was Top Secret

In creating the iPhone, Steve Jobs gave Scott Forstall free rein to assemble a team of his choosing. There was, however, just one rule -- he couldn't hire anyone from outside Apple. Interestingly enough, when pitching the project to prospective team members, Forstall couldn't even tell them what it was about, only mentioning that it would require hard work and that they'd have to "give up nights" and work weekends for quite some time.

Apple Designed a Landline Phone In 1983

In 1983, Apple computer developer Hartmut Esslinger designed a landline phone that used a stylus-controlled interface. Of course, it looked nothing like the iPhone we’ve come to know and love, but that’s when the idea was first hatched. Unfortunately, the phone never saw the light of day, but it’s an interesting footnote in Apple’s history with connected phones.

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PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know that  Steve  Jobs  use the  i-phone to  do  a  prank phone call to  Star Bucks=====

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Didn't Know About Niagara Falls

On June 30, 1859, over 5,000 spectators watched French daredevil Charles Blondin cross over Niagara Falls on a tightrope. Here are five things you probably didn't know about Niagara Falls...

The Water Can Be Turned Off Manually

No, the falls don't come out of a faucet. But if needed, officials can have -- and have had -- temporary structures called cofferdams placed near the falls to halt the flow of water. These have allowed officials on both sides of the border to remove debris and reshape the falls, reclaiming some areas and working on the contour of the falls. A massive project in 1969 on the U.S. side, in which the flow of water was stopped, allowed officials to remove a giant pile of rock debris at the bottom of the falls.

You Have Only 50,000 More Years to Enjoy the Falls

The force of all that water running over the rocky shore and river bottom has been eroding the ground for thousands of years. The location of the falls has actually moved about eleven kilometers over the past 12,000 years. If you were to go back in time, you'd have to go to the site that would become Lewiston, New York to find the edge - not the city of Niagara Falls. The falls are still moving slowly back, and researchers estimate that the falls will disappear into Lake Erie between 23,000 and 50,000 years from now.

Acrobat Charles Blondin Made Multiple Trips Across the Falls

Blondin made his successful tightrope walk in 1859, defying the conventional wisdom (and bets) that he would plunge to his death. He returned to the falls repeatedly in 1859 and 1860, crossing again and again, sometimes with a wheelbarrow, and once with his manager as a passenger on his back. Blondin knew that people were fascinated by the risk of each crossing and the potential for him to meet a grisly death. And he would play up the surprise factor. During his first crossing, for example, he sat down on the rope and drank from a bottle of wine that he hauled up from a ferry on the water below, before getting back up to finish the tightrope crossing. During a later crossing, he cooked an omelet while up on the rope.

The First Successful Barrel Trip Didn't Occur Until 1901, but a Jumper Survived in 1829

As for the more well-known barrel attempts, the first person to survive going over the falls in a barrel was 63-year-old Annie Edson Taylor, in 1901. She was hoping to gain some fame and income from her attempt. Although she did get some attention, she didn't get the money she had hoped for. Additional attempts in barrels or other enclosed containers over the next century left a trail of battered -- and in some cases, missing or dead -- daredevils. The first record of someone trying to go over the falls at all is from 1829, when Sam Patch jumped down Horseshoe Falls, which is on the Canadian side.

No One Really Knows How Many People Visit Per Year

While some agencies have visitor numbers for specific purposes, there aren't any hard and fast numbers for visitors overall. Estimates range from 8 million to 30 million people per year (Niagara Falls Canada says 14 million visit each year). But no one has actually tried to keep an accurate count. One thing is for sure: The falls remain popular on both sides of the border. And even with only 50,000 possible years of life left before the falls erode away, there's plenty of time to go see this natural wonder.

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PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that  a  jumper  survived  jumping  in to  the  falls  in  1829===

dgrimm60

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6 Surprising Facts About The Battle of Gettysburg

On July 1, 1863, one of the biggest battles of the Civil War between Union and Confederate troops began outside of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Here are 6 facts you may not know about this bloody battle fought on American soil...

The Second Day’s Battle Was The Largest of The Three

On the second of three extremely bloody and costly battle days, the fighting took place at famous locations such as Devil’s Den, Little Round top, Cemetery Hill, Culp’s Hill, and the Peach Orchard. All told, the second day’s battle required over 100,000 soldiers, 20,000 of whom ended up killed, wounded, captured, or missing. Overall, the battle ranked as the 10th bloodiest battle of the Civil War – all in just one day!

A Surprising Number of Women Fought as Soldiers

Women who disguised themselves as men fought on both sides throughout the Civil War, including nine who were known to have died on the battlefield, seven who were taken as prisoners of war, and another seven who were wounded. The body of one female soldier was found near the stone wall on Cemetery Ridge at Gettysburg following Pickett’s charge, and another was wounded at the battle and lost a leg. Marie Tepe was one Philadelphia woman who fought in 13 battles, including at Gettysburg.

The Wagon Train of Wounded Confederates Soldiers Was 17 Miles Long

After a shocking and disheartening defeat, the Army of North Virginia fled Gettysburg on July 4 bound for home. There were enough wounded soldiers to fill a 17-mile wagon train that filed back down through Pennsylvania and Maryland, bound for Virginia. However, the company met trouble when they reached the Potomac River; heavy rainfall arrived as the battle ceased and lasted for several days, causing dangerously high water levels and blocking the troops’ passage across.

Residents of Gettysburg Collected Over 37,000 Rifles from the Battlefield.

Of those 24,000 were loaded with at least one round of ammunition. An estimated 7,000 rounds of ammunition were fired at Gettysburg along with over 500 cannonballs. One estimate claims it took 100 rounds of ammunition for one casualty at Gettysburg. Rifles could shoot about 400 yards, whereas the cannons could reach up to a mile and a half.   

The Only Civilian Casualty Was a Young Woman Baking in Her Kitchen

On July 2, Major General George Meade and his troops brought the numbers of Union soldiers to 90,000, and Confederate troop numbers had reached 75,000. A young woman named Mary Virginia Wade, age 20, was the only non-soldier to die during the three-day battle. It was reported that Mary was baking bread as a number of women were to pass out to the soldiers on both sides when she was hit by a stray bullet. A statue was erected in her honor in Gettysburg in 1900.

The Last Fallen Soldier Was Found in 1996

When the battle was over, the citizens of Gettysburg had the onerous task of burying almost 7,000 corpses left behind by the military. So the graves tended to be shallow and covered with stones because speed was important. On November 19, 1863, President Lincoln arrived to speak at the dedication of a national cemetery for the Union soldiers. It was said that the smell of death still hung in the air as he gave the Gettysburg Address because of the hasty burial of the Confederate bodies. The last remaining body was found in 1996 close to Railroad Cut. It hasn’t been determined whether he was a Union or Confederate soldier, although it has been speculated that he was from a Mississippi regiment.

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PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that  several  women were dressed  as  men that   died===taken prisoner===wounded in  this  battle

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Amelia Earhart_2

On July 2, 1937, the plane carrying Amelia Earhart, a 39-year-old pilot from Kansas, disappeared over the Pacific Ocean. What happened to Earhart remains a mystery today, but here are 5 interesting facts about her disappearance you may not know…

Amelia Earhart Learned to Fly From a Female Aviator

Neta Snook Southern was the first woman who learned to fly at the Curtiss Flying School, located in Virginia. She was also the first female aviator in Iowa as well as the first to operate her own commercial airfield and aviation business. In 1921, she gave flying lessons to Earhart in Long Beach, California, at Kinner Field. She reportedly charged Earhart $1 a minute while they were in the air. But not in cash, she was paid in Liberty Bonds.

Earhart Worked as the Aviation Editor for Cosmopolitan Magazine

Earhart was hired by Cosmopolitan in 1928 and published 16 articles about aviation that told of her adventures and encouraged women to learn to fly. Her articles ranged from “Why Are Women Afraid to Fly?” to “Try Flying Yourself.” In addition, she encouraged women to fly commercially, although this did not occur until after the close of World War II.

Eleanor Roosevelt Considered Learning How to Fly

Earhart met Eleanor Roosevelt in 1932, and the First Lady was so interested in the famous female pilot, that she decided to take flying lessons. Although Roosevelt obtained her student permit and went through a physical exam, she never took the flying lessons. However, they did take a flight together in April 1933, and newspapers reported that the First Lady took the controls for a short time.

Earhart Launched Her Own Clothing Line in 1933

Earhart was one of the first celebrities to start her own clothing line. It was operated out of a New York hotel and may have been inspired by designer Elsa Schiaparelli. Her clothing was sold only at Marshall Field’s and Macy’s and included a line of suits, pants, dresses, blouses, and hats. The clothing line was aviation-inspired in some ways, including the use of parachute cloth and buttons shaped like propellers.

The Search for Amelia Earhart Cost the U.S. Government $4 Million

Earhart’s around-the-world flight ended on July 2, 1937, when her plane disappeared somewhere near Howland Island, near the equator in the Pacific Ocean. The search was officially called off on July 19 after finding no sign of the plane. Some believe that Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, landed on the shore of Nikumaroro Island after running out of fuel. In 1940, bone fragments and other items such as a woman’s shoe were found on the same remote Pacific island. However, no report of the DNA analysis has been released to confirm that it was tied to Earhart’s disappearance.

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5 Things You Didn't Know About "Back To The Future"_3

On July 3rd, 1985, Back to the Future, starring Michael J. Fox and Christopher Lloyd, hit theaters. The movie spent 11 weeks at number one and went on to become the highest grossing movie of the year. You can take your own time travel adventure with these five facts about the movie!

Michael J. Fox Almost Wasn't Marty McFly.

Eric Stoltz was originally cast for the role of Marty McFly when production of Back to the Future began on November 26, 1984. After seeing a rough cut of the film, Steven Spielberg decided that Stoltz had played the role too seriously for a comedy, and was woefully miscast. Realizing their mistake, Michael J. Fox was hired, and the seven weeks of scenes that were shot using Stoltz had to be remade, although you can still see Stoltz’s arm in a fight scene with “Biff” Tannen. That same year, Stoltz starred as Rocky Dennis in the movie Mask and ended up with a Golden Globe nomination for Best Supporting Actor.

The DeLorean Was Almost a Mustang...And a Refrigerator

Early drafts of Back to the Future had Marty McFly jumping back in time in an old refrigerator, but the idea was scrapped by producers in favor of the now-famous DeLorean. Once filming began, Universal Studios received a call from Ford offering $75 million for the DeLorean to be swapped with a Mustang. Director Robert Zemeckis reportedly responded: "Doc Brown doesn't drive a [expletive] Mustang!" The creator of the DeLorean wrote a "thank you" note to the writers for their inclusion of his car.  

President Reagan Was a Big Fan

Anyone who has seen the film likely recalls the shout out President Reagan receives in the film. But Reagan reportedly found the scene so funny that he had the projectionist rewind the movie to watch it a second time. Later, Reagan quoted the movie during his 1986 State of the Union address: "where we're going, we don't need roads," and producers offered him a role in Back to the Future III (he declined).

Doc Brown Once Had a Chimp Sidekick Called Shemp

The original movie script called for Professor (later changed to Doc) Brown to have a pet chimpanzee called Shemp, not a dog named Einstein. The head of Universal, Sid Sheinberg, nixed the idea, saying that movies with chimps in them didn’t make any money. Co-writer Bob Gale pointed to the success of Every Which Way But Loose, in which Clint Eastwood starred with a simian called Clive. But that was an orangutan, Sheinberg replied. Big difference. Shemp subsequently became a dog named Einstein. 

The Studio Wanted to Call the Film, Spaceman from Pluto.

Bob Gale had to shop the Back to the Future script for quite a while before getting a bite from Universal Pictures (Gale claims he was rejected more than 40 times). And the studio was understandably concerned about certain aspects of the movie—namely that one scene with Marty and his mom in the back of the car and the film's title. Executives had seen a trail of recent time-travel movie flops and were concerned Zemeckis's film would suffer the same fate, so they suggested an alternate name: Spaceman from Pluto. Executive producer Steven Spielberg quite literally laughed in their face about it.

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5 Things You Didn't Know About Independence Day_2

On July 4, 1776, the American colonies were declared free of British rule by the Second Continental Congress with the passage of the Declaration of Independence. Here are 5 things you didn't know about Independence Day...

John Adams Thought July 2nd Would Become Independence Day

It is widely believed that America’s first Continental Congress declared their independence from the British monarchy on July 4th, 1776. However, the official vote actually took place two days before on July 2nd.  In a letter that John Adams wrote on July 3, 1777, to Abigail, his wife, he predicted that “The Second Day of July 1776, will be the most memorable Epocha, in the History of America.” 

The Declaration of Independence Wasn’t Fully Signed on The Fourth of July

It is often believed that everyone signed the Declaration of Independence on July 4th, a moment that’s often portrayed in popular paintings. However, it took an entire month to get all 56 delegates together to put their “John Hancock” on the document. In fact, the only person to sign the document on July 4th was also its first signer: John Hancock.

Three American Presidents Died on Independence Day

James Monroe, Thomas Jefferson and John Adams all passed away on the 4th, and Jefferson and Adams passed away within a few hours of each other in 1826. Their deaths occurred 50 years after the date that the Second Continental Congress passed the Declaration. America’s fifth president, James Monroe, passed away on the same day five years later.

About That “Pursuit of Happiness”…

Arguably the most famous line in the Declaration of Independence is the second sentence of the preamble, which begins, “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed, by their Creator, with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” But as originally drafted by Thomas Jefferson, the pursuit was not of happiness, but of “Property.” As the story goes, Benjamin Franklin convinced Jefferson to make the change because “property” was too “narrow” a notion.

During World War II, the Declaration Was Stashed Away at Fort Knox.

Following the deadly attack on Pearl Harbor by the Japanese, the Declaration, along with the U.S. Constitution, was removed from Washington, D.C. for safety. The two documents traveled with a contingent of armed guards and were packed in special padlocked containers that were lead sealed and put into an even larger box. With additional protection supplied by the Secret Service, the documents were taken by train to Louisville, Kentucky, and escorted by 13th Armored Division cavalry troops to Fort Knox.

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PHKRAUSE

I did  not  know  that the  word  happiness   was  not the  original word in the  draft====

dgrimm60

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5 Things You Probably Didn't Know About The Bikini

On July 5, 1946, the bikini bathing suit was introduced at a popular Paris swimming pool by French designer Louis Réard.  In honor of National Bikini Day, here are 5 things you didn't know about this skimpy two-piece swimsuit...

It Was Named After a Nuclear Test Site

Réard was expecting his creation to cause a stir especially with the conservative public of the 1940s. Hoping that his new swimsuit would be as explosive as an atomic bomb, he named it “bikini” after the Bikini Atoll, a place somewhere in the Pacific Ocean that was used by the Americans for nuclear tests.

The First Bikini Model Was a French Stripper.

Because of the raunchiness of “le bikini,” no model in Paris dared to wear it. Réard was left with no choice but to hire Micheline Bernardini, an 18-year-old exotic dancer to model his creation. On July 1946, Réard unveiled the bikini to the press in a public pool in Paris. As the swimwear made the headlines, Bernardini became an instant celebrity. In fact, she received 50,000 fan mail letters—from men, mostly—after the launch.

It Was Very Controversial

The bikini was so scandalous that it was banned in countries like Italy, Portugal, and Spain. Even the Americans were appalled by it for many years, with Modern Girl magazine saying “it is inconceivable that any girl with tact and decency would ever wear such a thing.” Some women were also denied entry to the beach for wearing bikinis. And if that wasn’t enough, during the very first Miss World pageant in 1951, some countries threatened to withdraw delegates when the winner, Kiki Hakansson of Sweden, was crowned in her bikini. Not surprisingly, the Pope condemned Hakansson, claiming that the two-piece swimsuit was sinful.

Several Places Still Ban Wearing Bikinis Today

Although most countries have since lifted those early bans on the bikini, some cities around the world still ban the provocative piece. Such places include Hvar, Croatia, where you can get fined for walking the streets in a swimsuit; the Maldives, where most public beaches are for one-piece suits only; and Ras al-Khaimah in United Arab Emirates, where swimwear is banned entirely.

The Most Expensive Bikini in The World Will Cost You $30 Million

The most expensive bikini in the world was created specifically for Sports Illustrated and Molly Sims in 2012. Designed by jeweler Susan Rosen, the two-piece is made of over 150 carats of flawless diamonds set in Platinum, and it is valued at more than $30 million.

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5 Things You Didn't Know About George Walker Bush

On July 6, 1946, George Walker Bush, the son of future President George Herbert Walker Bush, was born in New Haven, Connecticut.  Here are 5 things you didn’t know about George W. Bush, known affectionately by many people as Dubya.

George W. Bush is Cousins With Hugh Hefner

It turns out our 43rd president and the founder of Playboy are distant cousins. More specifically, they’re ninth cousins twice removed, sharing the same pair of great-grandparents. Another cousin shared by the two is former presidential candidate John Kerry.

He Was a Cheerleader in School

Bush attended high school at Phillips Academy, a boarding school in Andover, Massachusetts, where he played baseball and was the head cheerleader during his senior year. He attended Yale University from 1964 to 1968, graduating with a Bachelor of Arts degree in history. During this time, he was a cheerleader and a member of the Delta Kappa Epsilon, serving as the president of the fraternity during his senior year. Other politicians who were cheerleaders in school were Franklin D. Roosevelt, Mitt Romney, Ronald Reagan, and Dwight D. Eisenhower.

He Was Arrested

You might know that Bush was arrested, but did you know he was arrested three times?  He was arrested the first time in 1966 when he and some friends liberated a Christmas wreath from the door of a hotel. The second time was in 1967 at a Princeton/Yale football game when he and some rowdy friends tried to tear down the goalposts in a post-game celebration, and the third time was in 1976 when he was arrested for drunk driving in Kennebunkport.

He Is the Only U.S. President With an MBA

Though you might not think of Bush as a brainiac, he is actually the only president in the history of the United States to have his Master’s of Business Administration. He first received a bachelor’s degree in history from Yale University in 1968, and continued his education at Harvard Business School, where he earned a Masters of Business Administration degree in 1975.

He Owned a Baseball Team

In April 1989, Texas Rangers owner and oil tycoon Eddie Chiles, sold the team to an investment group headed by George W. Bush for $89 million. While his own equity in the team was a small one ($500,000), Bush was named Managing General Partner of the new ownership group. Bush left his position with the Rangers when he was elected Governor of Texas in 1994, and he sold his stake in the team in 1998. Bush went on to be elected President of the United States two years later.

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5 Powerful Facts To Know About The Hoover Dam

On July 7, 1930, construction of the Hoover Dam began outside of Las Vegas, Nevada. It was the largest dam of its time, as well as one of the largest man-made structures in the world. Here are five powerful facts you probably didn't know about the Hoover Dam...

It Once Was The Earth’s Tallest Dam

Rising 726.4 feet, Hoover Dam was the world’s tallest dam when it was built in the 1930s. These days, it’s the second-tallest dam in the U.S., having been surpassed by the 770-foot-high Oroville Dam in Northern California in 1968. The globe’s tallest dam is the 1,001-foot-high Jinping-I Dam in Liangshan, Sichuan, China, which became operational in 2013.

It Contains Enough Concrete To Wrap Around The Earth

Imagine a four-foot-wide sidewalk wrapped completely around the Earth at the equator. That’s a lot of concrete! That’s how much concrete it took to build the Hoover Dam. It’s amazing when you think about it. The dam is 726 feet tall and 1,244 feet long. That’s almost a quarter of a mile. At its base, the dam is a whopping 660 feet thick. That’s longer than two football fields stretched end-to-end!  Additionally, the dam required about five million barrels of cement, nearly equaling the total quantity of cement utilized by the The Bureau of Reclamation in its previous 27 years of existence.

Building Hoover Dam Created An Entire City

Speaking of places named Boulder, you may not know that Nevada’s Boulder City didn’t exist before the Hoover Dam project. In fact, the city was built in 1930 solely to house the 5,000 workers employed to build the dam. Boulder City was constructed on federal land and had no local mayor or other elected officials. Oddly enough, the entire city was managed by an employee of the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. This person had the power to institute rules as he saw fit. Some of Boulder City’s early statutes even banned gambling and the consumption of alcohol. It wasn’t until 1960, thirty years after the city’s initial construction, that the federal government surrendered control, and Boulder City was officially incorporated.

As Many As 138 Workers Died During Construction

Hoover Dam was built between 1931 and 1936, and those five years were not without disaster. Reports from the construction site list 96 deaths due to accidents. In addition, 42 workers were reported to have died from illnesses while the dam was being built. However, today some historians believe that it was exposure to carbon monoxide in construction tunnels resulting in carbon monoxide poisoning, which actually caused these additional deaths.

The Nazis Plotted To Blow Up Hoover Dam During WWII

In November 1939, U.S. officials learned of a Nazi plan to blow up Hoover Dam. Destroying Hoover Dam would have had the disastrous effect of cutting off critical electrical power to southern California’s airplane manufacturing industry. To combat further attempts on the dam, U.S. authorities imposed restrictions on boats allowed into Black Canyon and employees who worked at the dam. Following the December 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor and America’s entry into World War II, Hoover Dam was closed to all visitors until the war ended in 1945.

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5 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Betty Ford_2

On July 8, 2011, former First Lady Betty Ford died in Rancho Mirage, CA, at the age of 93. Outside of being a first lady, she is probably best known for starting the Betty Ford Clinic. Here are five things you didn't know about Betty Ford…

Betty Ford Was Married to a Man Before Gerald Ford

His name was William Warren, and he asked Betty to her first school dance at age 12. “She married him thinking he’d be a good match, but it didn’t work out. After five years of marriage, Ford filed for divorce. She then married Gerald Ford in Grand Rapids in 1948. After Ford became vice president, a People magazine reporter asked why she never spoke about the divorce. Her response: “Well, nobody ever asked me.”

Ford Originally Had a Chance to Be a Professional Dancer

Ford nearly had a very different life, and she likely would have continued down another path had it not been for her mother's worry about her not being married. Ford used to study dance with the esteemed Martha Graham and actually performed in shows. However, her mother pressured her to return home and get married. Her mother didn't really approve of the dance career, and Ford agreed that she was probably not going to become a dancing star.

Ford's Alcohol Use Was a Reaction to Painkiller Use

Ford's battle with addiction began after she took painkillers for a pinched nerve. She gradually began taking more and more pills daily, reaching about 25 pills per day at one point. Her family staged an intervention and got her into treatment. When she went into rehab, she admitted only to drug addiction at first. It wasn't until another person in rehab refused to admit to alcoholism that Ford suddenly admitted her own battles with alcohol. 

She Didn’t Want Her Name on The Rehabilitation Center

Ford didn't want the clinic to have her name on it, not out of shame, but because she felt that it took the focus off the rehab purpose of the center. However, her husband and several other people convinced her to keep her name on the clinic because having that famous name made it easier for people to admit to having problems. The idea was that, if a former First Lady could publicly own her problems, then everyone else could, too. Decades later, over 90,000 people — from actress Elizabeth Taylor, singer Johnny Cash and actress Drew Barrymore, to parents who want to sober up for their families — have sought treatment at the facility.

He Is Credited With Saving Mary Tyler Moore's Life

Actress Mary Tyler Moore checked into the Betty Ford Center in 1984 to be treated for alcohol dependence. Moore wasn't too keen on the mundane tasks of cleaning and abiding rules at the facility. So she snuck out in a taxi to a Marriott. The next morning, Betty Ford gave her a ring. “That phone call saved my life,” Moore wrote in her memoir “After All.” “I returned on my knees, pleading for reentry.”

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