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Gregory Matthews

Fundamentalism, A Defination

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Gregory Matthews

In another thread, Fundamentalism has been discussed, with several understandings suggested for what it may mean.  I  have decided to go to the following dictionary to see how it defines its meaning:

Smith, Jonathan A, and Green, William Scott, Editors.  The Harper Collins Dictionary of Religion.  1995, 1,154 pages.

NOTE:  The actual definition of the  word "Fundamentalism in the above work, covers more than one page.  My quote is an abstract of what is said in the above dictionary and I have numbered the different meanings, which were not numbered in the above book. In addition, I have not listed every example.  E.G. I have not listed the example found in Islam.  In addition, the wording for # 6 is my wording.

Quote

1.  In its strictest sense, the rejection by a given religious group of the results of historical-critical study of their sacred texts.  2.  In a broader sense, the struggle against modernism by religious groups who claim the continued relevancy of earlier time periods for models of truth and value and reject what they perceive as forms of secularism.  Such groups are often characterized by a strict authoritarianism that disallows individual variation from the defined scriptural norm of faith.  3. Fundamentalism is a Protestant view that affirms the absolute and unerring authority of the Bible, rules out a scientific  or critical study of the scriptures, denies the theory of evolution, and holds that alternate religious views within Christianity or outside are false.  4.  A Bible conference of conservative Protestants in Niagara, New York, in 1895 that affirmed five doctrinal points that were later named the "Five fundamentals,"  the verbal inerrancy of the scriptures, the divinity of Jesus, the virgin birth, the substitutionary atonement and Jesus' bodily resurrection and physical return.  5. A series of volumes entitled The Fundamentals. . . (1910-15) . . . attacking Catholic doctrine, Christian science, Mormon teachings, Darwin's theory of evolution and liberal theologies critical study of the Bible and denial of miracles.  6. NOTE:  In further discussion Fundamentalism is said to typically include evangelism, premillennialism, attacks on contemporary science, and evolution.

 

 

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Gustave
9 hours ago, Gregory Matthews said:

In another thread, Fundamentalism has been discussed, with several understandings suggested for what it may mean.  I  have decided to go to the following dictionary to see how it defines its meaning:

Smith, Jonathan A, and Green, William Scott, Editors.  The Harper Collins Dictionary of Religion.  1995, 1,154 pages.

NOTE:  The actual definition of the  word "Fundamentalism in the above work, covers more than one page.  My quote is an abstract of what is said in the above dictionary and I have numbered the different meanings, which were not numbered in the above book. In addition, I have not listed every example.  E.G. I have not listed the example found in Islam.  In addition, the wording for # 6 is my wording.

 

I very well could and can be wrong on this but in the context we're discussing I've always understood it to be a literal or "fundamental" way one practices their belief system. 

In Islam you have the Koran and the "authoritative interpretations" of it in the Hadith. 

A fundamentalist Muslim isn't a terrorist, its simply a strict "by the books" (Koran & Hadith) Muslim & because the Koran & Hadith spell out in detail how Muslims are to interact with other religions Muslims who are "fundamental" in their practice tend to either do or support things outsiders view as terrorist acts. 

 

Within Seventh-day Adventism the primary appeal is to the Bible and the "authoritative interpretations" of it by Ellen White.

Ellen White
If you seek to turn aside the counsel of God to suit yourselves, if you lessen the confidence of God's people in the testimonies He has sent them, you are rebelling against God as certainly as were Korah, Dathan, and Abiram." Testimonies, Vol. 5, p. 66

Ellen White
The Spirit fell upon me and I was taken off in vision. I saw the state of some who stood on present truth, but disregarded the visions, -the way God had chosen to teach in some cases, those who erred from Bible truth. I saw that in striking against the visions they did not strike against the worm - the feeble instrument that God spake through; but against the Holy Ghost. I saw it was a small thing to speak against the instrument, but it was dangerous to slight the words of God. I saw if they were in error and God chose to show them their errors through visions, and they disregarded the teachings of God in visions, they would be left to take their own way, and run in the way of error, and think they were right, until they would find it out too late. Then in the time of trouble I heard them cry to God in agony - 'Why didst thou not show us our wrong that we might have got right and been ready for this time'... He spoke through visions, and he gave you up to your own ways, to be filled with your own doings." 1849 Broadside Paper

General Conference statement on Ellen White
As Seventh-day Adventists we are uniquely fortunate in approaching this question. We are not left to find our way, drawing conclusions only from writings penned 19 centuries ago, which have come down to us through varied transcriptions and translations. Concerning inspiration, with us it is an almost contemporary matter, for we have a prophet in our midst... What is more, rather than having in our possession only relatively short documents or a handful of letters, as is the case with the extant records of the Bible prophets, we have the full range of Ellen G. White writings penned through a period of 70 years, embodying her published books, her 4,600 periodical articles, and her manuscripts, letters, and diaries. We have also the testimonies of her contemporaries - eyewitness accounts of those who lived and worked closely with her. Both she and they discussed many points touching on the visions and on the manner in which the light was imparted to her, and how she, in turn, conveyed the messages to those for whom they were intended. In other words, the eyewitnesses discussed the operation of inspiration... Further, she wrote in a modern language, so a large number of people today can study her writings in the original language, without needing to depend on a translation. Rarely, too, is it necessary to depend upon a transcription." - Inspiration and the Ellen G. White Writings, reprint, p. 3.

Thus, it's reasonable to conclude that a devout SDA living at the time Ellen White lived and reading her "words from God" would dare to strike out against "the worm" because in this case it wasn't just any worm. 

 

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