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phkrause

Here's your (not so) totally useless fact(s) of the day:

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phkrause

Mail Delivery by Mule Still Exists in One Location The creed of the U.S. Postal
Service is “"Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these
couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds." This is especially
true for the residents of Supai, Arizona, who have their mail delivered by mule.
Supai lies at the Grand Canyon’s bottom, where members of the Havasupai tribe
receive their mail. The route is an eight-mile trip taken by mules and horses.

James

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phkrause

Until the mid-19th century, recipients—not the senders—usually had to pay for
postage on the letters they received. As a result, people tended to refuse so
many letters in order to escape paying for them, which caused the post office to
spend an inordinate amount of time returning mail to senders. Postage stamps
which were prepaid—were introduced in America in 1847 and eliminated this
problem.

James

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phkrause

Leap years have 366 days instead of the usual 365 days and occur almost every
four years. How do you remember if it’s a leap year? Simple: If the last two digits
of the year are divisible by four (e.g. 2016, 2020, 2024…) then it’s a leap year.
Century years are the exception to this rule. They must be divisible by 400 to be
leap years. According to these rules, the years 2000 and 2400 are leap years,
while 1800, 1900, 2100, 2200, 2300, and 2500 are not leap years. As a bonus,
U.S. leap years almost always coincide with election years.

James

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phkrause

Established in 1961, McDonald’s Hamburger University was founded by Ray
Kroc. The University was created to train McDonald’s employees in the art of
restaurant management. The 80 acre main campus located in Oak Brooke,
Illinois, has 19 full time professors who are trained to teach in over 28 different
languages. Today, the University enrolls more than 5,000 students annually.
Over 300,000 students and future restaurant managers have graduated from
Hamburger University. And it’s not as easy as you might think. According to a
recent Bloomberg finding, Hamburger University is reportedly harder to get into
than Harvard.

And they just tore it down a couple of months ago (I think they moved it to
downtown Chicago)

James

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phkrause

Americans can thank Robert Ripley, the American cartoonist who wrote “Ripley’s
Believe It or Not!,” for encouraging the Congress to pass legislation naming a
National Anthem. Many people wrote to Ripley after the cartoon appeared, and
he urged them to write their congressmen. After Congress received a petition
with five million signatures on it, they passed legislation naming “The Star
Spangled Banner” as the National Anthem. President Herbert Hoover signed the
legislation into law in 1931.

James

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phkrause

Sports fans all know that the national anthem will be sung at sporting events;
however, many don’t know that the first time it was sung was in Brooklyn, New
York, at a baseball game in 1862, during the Civil War. However, the song hadn’t
yet been designated as the national anthem, and wasn’t really a common
occurrence at sporting events. That began to change on September 5, 1918,
during Game 1 of the World Series between the Boston Red Sox and the
Chicago Cubs. By the time World War II rolled around, baseball and football
teams were playing the national anthem as a show of patriotism, and the tradition
continues to this day.

James

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phkrause

Caesars Palace was the first true themed resort along the Las Vegas Strip. The
Roman-themed hotel has a replica of the Statue of David among other statues
throughout the hotel. This statue is truly special, because it’s an exact replica of
Michelangelo’s masterpiece, sculpted from the same Italian marble Michelangelo
used (Carrara marble). The replica stands 18 feet tall, and weighs more than
nine tons. The original David was unveiled on September 8, 1504 and currently
resides in the Galleria dell’Accademia in Florence, Italy.

James

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phkrause

The Ratio of the Oreo is Precise. The perfection of an Oreo cookie is down to an
exact science. The cookie- to- crème ratio of an original Oreo cookie is always,
without fail, 71 percent to 29 percent. When it comes to Double Stuf Oreos, it
turns out they are not quite doubled. A cookie-loving math teacher and his
students cracked the case. Turns out Double Stuf Oreos have only 1.86 times
the amount of filling compared to a regular Oreo.

James

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phkrause

The Oreo Cookies Were Basically a Knock-Off of Sunshine Hydrox. Many people
think that Oreos were the original chocolate sandwich cookie, but Sunshine
Hydrox introduced a cream-filled cookie held together by two chocolate biscuits
in 1908. Oreos are sweeter and less crunchy than the original Hydrox, but that
may not be why Oreos took over the market. The problem with the Hydrox
cookies may have been the name itself, which sounds a bit more like a chemical
compound than something tasty.

James

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phkrause

Back in 1996, when founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin were working on
creating what we now know as Google, they initially called it Backrub—a nod to
the way the search engine analyzed the web's "back links" to determine how
important a site was. A year later, though, they decided they needed to upgrade
to a name that indicated just how much data they were indexing. They eventually
came up with Google, a play on the word “googol,” a mathematical term for the
number represented by the digit 1 followed by 100 zeros.

James

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phkrause

Ranch dressing was created in 1949 by a plumber in Alaska. Steve Henson
started cooking for his coworkers and perfecting his buttermilk dressing recipe.
Five years later he moved to California with his wife Gayle and bought a ranch.
His famous buttermilk dressing soon became a staple at the dinner table of
Hidden Valley Ranch and before long the Hensons started selling it to guests and
local supermarkets. Over two decades later in 1972, the couple sold their name
and recipe to Clorox for $8 million. Not bad for a little buttermilk, mayo, and
herbs.

James

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phkrause

Drew Barrymore holds the distinction of being the youngest person ever to host
Saturday Night Live. When Barrymore first stepped on the Saturday Night Live
stage on November 20, 1982, she was just 7 years old. Barrymore's first time
hosting ‘SNL’, was certainly not to be her last. While her popularity soared
because of the movie E.T. that year, she went on to have a very successful film
career through adulthood. Barrymore has since joined SNL's exclusive Five
Timer's Club - a group of celebrities who have hosted the show at least five
times.

James

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phkrause

There are a total of four state capitals in the United States that are named after
former presidents. Lincoln, Nebraska, is of course named after our 16th
President Abraham Lincoln. Madison, Wisconsin is named after our 4th President
James Madison; Jefferson City, Missouri is named for our 3rd President Thomas
Jefferson; and Jackson, Mississippi, is named for the 7th President Andre
Jackson. In addition, our national capital Washington, D.C., is of course named
after George Washington, the 1st President of the United States.

James

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phkrause

Twitter Was Almost Named Twitch Jack Dorsey, the co-founder of Twitter,
revealed that the original working title for the platform was “Twitch” because
when someone received a message their phone would jitter and buzz. They
ended up turning to the dictionary of all dictionaries - the Oxford English
Dictionary - where “twitter” is defined as a short burst of inconsequential
information like a bird chirp. Since it was exactly what the new platform was
designed to do, that made the name "Twitter" an easy choice. The fact that
the price for the domain name was cheap didn't hurt either.

James

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