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Antiperspirants and deodorants with aluminum


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unfortunately 99% of all breast and ovarian cancers are caused by the aluminum (alum) in antiperspirants and people are not being told this. these cancers affect the outer quadrants of each breast and the lymph nodes under the armpit...
 
stop using them, buy product that does not have these things in them or make your own. I have a recipe.
 
to balance estrogens (aluminum has estrogen qualities) , use wild yam cream
 
detox the body from aluminum with montana yew tip tea...take it daily for a month and then once a week for maintenance, I make mine very strong and it tastes bad but does the trick
 
take high doses of vitamin C to combat the cancer, in the liposomal form  6 g a day, can use tinctures of blood root as well
 
men are affected too but the women shave so it enters the body easily, it may be the cause of enlarged prostate but no one wants to do the research
 
the rest of the cancers are caused by fungus/mold in the environment that gets into the body
 
 
 
 I have no problem with the surgery to remove lumps but if you do nothing else it will come back.. of course a vegan diet with lots of kale greens and no refined fats, grains, sugars.... except pure unrefined coconut oil with some drops of frankincense oil is also anti-cancer.  I have the recipe if any of you are interested.
 
blood root salve can remove the tumors but unless you are familiar with this you might be scared...but it will pull out the cancer...  I've used it many times for simple skin cancers maybe 20 times so I'm familiar with the progress and care and how things look during the process
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RAHAB

thank  you  for  posting this  information=====i have heard  that  oil  of  Oregano  and  Zinc  Tabs  

help  build  up  your  immune  system====

dgrimm60

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3 hours ago, Rahab said:
unfortunately 99% of all breast and ovarian cancers are caused by the aluminum (alum) in antiperspirants and people are not being told this.

Unfortunately, you are perpetuating a myth.

As far back as 1841, breast cancer recognized as a major cause of cancer among women.

Aluminum in deodorants did not make it to market until about 1940.

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Photodude is incorrect 

women in Africa don’t get breast cancer and they don’t use antiperspirants 

 

ive been working with women here locally that are interested in doing things naturally and they are doing well 
one dear lady was stage 3 and after one year her counts are in the safe zone .  Her tumors all have disappeared and she is doing well. She continues the protocol and is tested every 6 months. 

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8 hours ago, dgrimm60 said:

RAHAB

thank  you  for  posting this  information=====i have heard  that  oil  of  Oregano  and  Zinc  Tabs  

help  build  up  your  immune  system====

dgrimm60

I’ve seen so many women die from this it just tears my heart out when I see them take the chemo that destroys their immune system and all eventually die. 
oregano oil is good for many things but not strong enough to battle breast cancer. 
its great for bacterial infection and toenail fungus. 

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Gregory Matthews

Rahab said: 

Quote

women in Africa don’t get breast cancer and they don’t use antiperspirants

  If true, such is not a proof that cancer is caused by that.

In my work with cancer patients, I have seen people die because they refused conventional treatment and took some natural treatment.  I have  had to deal with staff who were suffering at the needless death that did not need to happen.

By the way, there is no one type of cancer.  cancer exists in multiple forms and treatment has to be specific to the actual cancer.

By the way, there are chemo treatments for some cancers that do not destroy the immune system.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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the study in Africa was done in the early 70s and I don’t have access to that research. 
 

I do have the proof however of the aluminum link to breast cancer.   I’ll post when I find the link. If you can’t wait for me, You can do your own search at nutritionfacts.org.   Search breast cancer and antiperspirants. 
 

every person that I know that took chemo has died. Friends relatives etc. and the list keeps going. Ive cried my eyes out at their funerals. 
 

SOP tells us not to put poisons and drugs into our bodies. We are to use natural resources. 
 

all the chemo given here involves infusing chemicals and metals into the human body. 

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Gregory Matthews

Yes, sooner or later, all people die.  As a matter of fact, 100% of the women born in 1792 have died.

Cancer is considered cured if at the five (5) year point one is free of cancer.  Many women have lived beyond that point.

 

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Gregory Matthews

African women in Africa clearly get breast cancer:

https://medpharm.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/20742835.2017.1391467

Breast cancer is the most common cause of death in women globally.1–3 In 2012, about 14.1 million women were diagnosed with cancer, of which 1.7 million were breast cancer cases; 56.8% of the 1.7 million cases were from low-income countries. Some 522 000 deaths due to breast cancer were recorded the same year, with the majority from sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), from which, when compared with the WHO report of 2008, the incidence of breast cancer is seen to be on the rise.2 It is estimated that by 2025 over 19.3 million women, with the majority from SSA, will be suffering from breast cancer.2 The five-year survival rate of breast cancer in SSA is less than 40% compared with countries like the US, with survival rates of 86%. Factors contributing to the low five-year survival rate are a low level of awareness and lack of documentation on prevalence of breast cancer. Most cancers are usually in advanced stages at presentation.4–6 Of 184 countries in the world, breast cancer is the most diagnosed form of cancer in 140 countries.2 According to a report from the International Agency for Research in Cancer (IARC), 14.1 million cancer cases were diagnosed worldwide in 2012, of which 8 million were from low-income countries (LICs). A total of 8.2 million deaths were recorded the same year from cancer and 5.3 million were from LICs; it is stated that by 2030 an estimated 21.7 million people will suffer from cancer. Breast cancer remains the leading cause of death among women in Africa. An estimated 882 900 cases in LICs were diagnosed, of which 324 300 women died. The highest prevalence rate is noted in East, North and West Africa. A balanced approach is required for breast cancer control in SSA, which will include prevention, early detection, effective treatment and palliative care.7 However, it should be noted that most SSA countries lack cancer registries and the exact burden of the disease is therefore unquantified. Consequently, breast cancer is likely to be a neglected healthcare issue in these settings. Moreover, governments in SSA countries have other healthcare priorities, such as combating communicable diseases; and inadequate GDP expenditure on health care. Non-communicable diseases such as cancers, despite comprising significant healthcare burdens, are neglected healthcare matters in SSA.

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Gregory Matthews

The following is another link to breast cancer figures for Africa.  I must warn you that the following includes photographic evidence, which is raw.

https://oncologypro.esmo.org/content/download/102746/1814743/2017-ESMO-Africa-Epidemiology-of-Breast-Cancer-in-Africa-Joe-Nat+Clegg-Lamptey.pdf

Breast Cancer burden in Africa In Africa, breast cancer is responsible for 28% of all cancers and 20% all cancer deaths in women. (16% & 11% both sexes) Incidence rates are still generally low in Africa, estimated below 35 per 100,000 women in most countries (compared to over 90–120 per 100,000 in Europe or North America). Precise incidence figures in Africa are lacking given the absence of cancer registration in most countries.

 

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Gregory Matthews

Rahab, Your comments about cancer are simply wrong.  As to Africa, I could provide other citations but, if you can be  convinced by truth,  the couple of references that I have provided should convince you.

Further you are wrong on a couple of other issues:

*  Some chemo cancer treatments do not attack the immune system.  Rather they directly attack the  tumor  by other methods.

*  The multiple types of cancer require specific treatments for the identified type of  cancer.  There is no one treatment for every type of cancer.

*  Chemo treatment for cancer must be individualized  as to the specific chemical used and as to its dosage.  Every person requires specific adjustments to their needs..

*  In my experience. 75% of the people receiving chemo treatment for cancer did well on the treatment after the  medication had been individualized to them.  However, prior to the individualization,  it may have been rough.  That period generally did not extend beyond one week. 

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Gregory Matthews

Rahab, the following quote from Wikipedia lists some, not all, of the ways in which chemo attacks cancer.  Yes, sometimes it is through an attack on the immune system.  At other times it is by other methods.. Any suggestion that all chemo attacks the immune system in cancer treatment fails to fully inform as to the actual issues.

The term

 chemotherapy has come to connote non-specific usage of intracellular poisons to inhibit mitosis, cell division. The connotation excludes more selective agents that block extracellular signals (signal transduction). The development of therapies with specific molecular or genetic targets, which inhibit growth-promoting signals from classic endocrine hormones (primarily estrogens for breast cancer and androgens for prostate cancer) are now called hormonal therapies. By contrast, other inhibitions of growth-signals like those associated with receptor tyrosine kinases are referred to as targeted therapy.

Importantly, the use of drugs (whether chemotherapy, hormonal therapy or targeted therapy) constitutes systemic therapy for cancer in that they are introduced into the blood stream and are therefore in principle able to address cancer at any anatomic location in the body. Systemic therapy is often used in conjunction with other modalities that constitute local therapy (i.e. treatments whose efficacy is confined to the anatomic area where they are applied) for cancer such as radiation therapy, surgery or hyperthermia therapy.

Traditional chemotherapeutic agents are cytotoxic by means of interfering with cell division (mitosis) but cancer cells vary widely in their susceptibility to these agents. To a large extent, chemotherapy can be thought of as a way to damage or stress cells, which may then lead to cell death if apoptosis is initiated. Many of the side effects of chemotherapy can be traced to damage to normal cells that divide rapidly and are thus sensitive to anti-mitotic drugs: cells in the bone marrow, digestive tract and hair follicles. This results in the most common side-effects of chemotherapy: myelosuppression (decreased production of blood cells, hence also immunosuppression), mucositis (inflammation of the lining of the digestive tract), and alopecia (hair loss). Because of the effect on immune cells (especially lymphocytes), chemotherapy drugs often find use in a host of diseases that result from harmful overactivity of the immune system against self (so-called autoimmunity). These include rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, vasculitis and many others.

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Gregory Matthews

Rahab, you tell me to do my own research as to breast cancer and antiperspirants.  O.K. How about the following:

https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/myths/antiperspirants-fact-sheet

Is there a link between antiperspirants or deodorants and breast cancer?

Because underarm antiperspirants or deodorants are applied near the breast and contain potentially harmful ingredients, several scientists and others have suggested a possible connection between their use and breast cancer (1, 2). However, no scientific evidence links the use of these products to the development of breast cancer.

What is known about the ingredients in antiperspirants and deodorants?

Aluminum-based compounds are used as the active ingredient in antiperspirants. These compounds form a temporary “plug” within the sweat duct that stops the flow of sweat to the skin's surface. Some research suggests that aluminum-containing underarm antiperspirants, which are applied frequently and left on the skin near the breast, may be absorbed by the skin and have estrogen-like (hormonal) effects (3).

Because estrogen can promote the growth of breast cancer cells, some scientists have suggested that the aluminum-based compounds in antiperspirants may contribute to the development of breast cancer (3). In addition, it has been suggested that aluminum may have direct activity in breast tissue (4). However, no studies to date have confirmed any substantial adverse effects of aluminum that could contribute to increased breast cancer risks. A 2014 review concluded there was no clear evidence showing that the use of aluminum-containing underarm antiperspirants or cosmetics increases the risk of breast cancer (5).

Some research has focused on parabens, which are preservatives used in some deodorants and antiperspirants that have been shown to mimic the activity of estrogen in the body’s cells (6). It has been reported that parabens are found in breast tumors, but there is no evidence that they cause breast cancer. Although parabens are used in many cosmetic, food, and pharmaceutical products, most deodorants and antiperspirants in the United States do not currently contain parabens. The National Library of Medicine’s Household Products Database has information about the ingredients used in most major brands of deodorants and antiperspirants.

What is known about the relationship between antiperspirants or deodorants and breast cancer?

Only a few studies have investigated a possible relationship between breast cancer and underarm antiperspirants/deodorants. One study, published in 2002, did not show any increase in risk for breast cancer among women who reported using an underarm antiperspirant or deodorant (7). The results also showed no increase in breast cancer risk among women who reported using a blade (nonelectric) razor and an underarm antiperspirant or deodorant, or among women who reported using an underarm antiperspirant or deodorant within 1 hour of shaving with a blade razor. These conclusions were based on interviews with 813 women with breast cancer and 793 women with no history of breast cancer.

A subsequent study, published in 2006, also found no association between antiperspirant use and breast cancer risk, although it included only 54 women with breast cancer and 50 women without breast cancer (8).

A 2003 retrospective cohort study examining the frequency of underarm shaving and antiperspirant/deodorant use among 437 breast cancer survivors (2) reported younger age at breast cancer diagnosis for women who used antiperspirants/deodorants frequently or who started using them together with shaving at an earlier age. Because of the retrospective nature of the study, the results are not conclusive.

Because studies of antiperspirants and deodorants and breast cancer have provided conflicting results, additional research would be needed to determine whether a relationship exists (9).

 

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here is the recipe I use for aluminum free deodorant...

1 t. baking soda (grind it fine, I use mortar and pestle)
1 T. arrowroot
1 T. coconut oil, unrefined, organic
2-3 drops of an essential oil (can use any of these lemon, eucalyptus, lemongrass)

Mix and put in a small container.  Take a small amount and spread it over the area.  Can keep in refrig or in a cool area to keep it solidified.  

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